Eye On Horror

Season 5 is Here with a Scream!

January 31, 2022 iHorror Season 5 Episode 1
Eye On Horror
Season 5 is Here with a Scream!
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We are back!!! This week, we talk new movies amidst the January rut for horror titles, Jacob does January Giallo, and of course we talk about Scream 5 and the legacy of this genre-defining franchise.

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. Or should we say Welcome back to Eye On Horror. This is episode 79 Otherwise known as season five, episode one. Whoo. Yeah, season five for five seasons, yeah dude some of my favorite shows haven't even lasted that long. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always, and back again is your other host Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing well, I got a desk over the holidays. So now I can do my pod. I can do my podcast recording here instead of in bed.

James Jay Edwards:

Listeners can't see it. But when we do our recording, Jacob is usually laying down and now he's sitting up

Jacob Davidson:

like a gentleman

James Jay Edwards:

also back with us is your other other host Jon Correia who usually is also laying down but that's by choice how you doing Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

was that like classic like Golden Girls calling Blanche a slut joke?

James Jay Edwards:

I picture you, it's almost-- your bed is a hospital bed, I think

Jonathan Correia:

you know, I actually made the comment to Lindsey this morning. Because I I've had a desk a set set up but like, you know, it's been covered in mail for like a year now. So I recently had to work from home more. So I finally got my home office set up all nice and I got a picture of Blanche above me from Golden Girls, you know, a signed Clancy Brown laser disc for Pet Semetery 2, you know, above me, so like, you know, it's nice ambience. But yeah, I turned her I was like, man, recording the podcast from the desk is fine, but like, I missed the bed. And it is it's one of those beds that like folds up, you know, the top and the end. So you can put yourself in zero G mood. And I think that's why I sound more cranky this last season than previous. Just because I'm out of the bed.

James Jay Edwards:

Now speaking of we can't let it go. Speaking of your Golden Girls, we have to have a moment of silence for Betty White. Yes. And also a moment of silence for Meatloaf. Oh yeah. And a moment of silence for Louie Anderson, who died the same day as Meatloaf. Oh. And I don't even know who other moment of silence is we have to do but I'm getting depressed doing them. So let's move on.

Jonathan Correia:

It's a it's been a long time since we've been here. A lot has happened. But not a lot of releases. No.

Jacob Davidson:

It's January, It's been bare.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, that's it. That's January, I just been pretty much buried in awards voting, which, you know, there's a couple of fun things like a couple of animated things that really got me, The Mitchells vs. the Machines.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes! It's so good.

James Jay Edwards:

So much fun. So much fun. And it has one of our people the main girl in it is like a film nerd. It's awesome. and also the animated movie, Luca. Have you guys seen that one?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, that was a good one.

James Jay Edwards:

that one. It's about sea monsters.

Jacob Davidson:

It's it's a Pixar movie.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, sea monsters and but they they can come on they they find a way to come onto the shore and they turn into people. But when they get wet, they turn back to the monster. So it becomes like a hiding out from the people kind of thing. It's yeah, those are those were all fun.

Jonathan Correia:

Going back to The Mitchells vs. the Machines. I was just I was just happy to see representation for the ADHD kid who's obsessed with dinosaurs. As someone who's the 31 year old version of that and has been for like many years, you know, like I was very happy. Especially that one scene where it's just him on the phone calling people like hey, you want to talk about dinosaurs? No. Okay. You want to talk to me about dinosaurs? No.

James Jay Edwards:

Is he going through the phonebook?

Jonathan Correia:

He's just going through the phonebook.

Jacob Davidson:

And also there was a phone line where you could call him and talk about dinosaurs

Jonathan Correia:

and then not Oh, this scene whether that the rest stop dinosaurs that aren't like accurate are all fugly look like those are the best type of dinosaurs to see is the road stop ones

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, and there was a bit of horror in there when they go to the mall. And they even reference Dawn of the Dead and but instead of zombies, there's Furbies

Jonathan Correia:

the fall of man is upon us!

Jacob Davidson:

Yes. Including the giant killer furbie

James Jay Edwards:

Mitchells vs. the Machines is I mean, I would almost say it is kind of kids horror because it's basically is about the world being taken over by robots. And you know, this one family fighting them off base in I mean

Jacob Davidson:

the robot apocalypse

James Jay Edwards:

Yep, and the robot apocalypse.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that was yeah, that quickly that went from like, this film looks interesting to wow, this is one of my favorite of the year.

James Jay Edwards:

Netflix has gone balls out for all of their titles, and they have a lot of good stuff that you know, for voting, you know, like, the Power of the Dog is getting a lot of traction, Passing that Rebecca Hall movie. But they sent a package out for Mitchells vs. the Machines, and it has like a book and the soundtrack and the DVD. But then it also had and this before I saw it, it also had this little wooden moose. And I'm like, what is this? Yeah, it's a little moose toy. And then I put it in and I watched it and I'm like, Okay, now I'm glad I have this moose. This is awesome.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's really sweet.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it was pretty good. The Power of the Dog package they sent. I don't know if you guys seen the Power the Dog. It has like a keychain that has like a braided rope on it. Which you need to see the movie to understand the significance of that too. But

Jonathan Correia:

does it also come with a pack of pre rolled cigarettes?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, no. No, but they sent me a for The Harder They Fall. They sent me like a like a flask and a couple of whiskey thing you know, like for cowboy drinking. And and then I got a whole bottle of wine for The Lost Daughter and I there, Netflix-- Every day. I would get a new box full of awesome stuff from Netflix.

Jonathan Correia:

And I've been listening to that soundtrack for The Harder They Fall a lot lately. That's just it's such a fun movie.

James Jay Edwards:

you know, The Harder They Fall is you I think you'll like it. Jacob it's it's it's like a Tarantino movie. It's directed by James Samuels, and it's got like Idris Elba. But and I'm blanking on his name the dude from Get Out? Not not like Daniel Kaluuya ... Lakeith Stanfield? It's pretty good, though. I mean, but it's just total grindsploitation. the first scene is a killer. I mean, it'll grab you from the first scene.

Jonathan Correia:

It's it makes Django Unchained look like shit. Like, honestly

James Jay Edwards:

like a puppet show, Yeah, dude it's really good. They do a lot of like, awesome stuff. It's just your classic outlaw Western setup, but like the freshness of it is there. I know the director did a lot of because it's, it's produced and put together by Jay Z's team. So the director did a lot of Jay Z's music videos. The soundtrack is a lot of those collaborations. You know, so it's got and Regina, Regina King, it's just phenomenal. And that movie just absolutely kills it. So the cast is terrific. The whole cast is just

Jonathan Correia:

it's just like some of the best actors out there working right now. Just having fun like this. Like that takes itself serious when it needs to but it also knows when to have fun. So yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

which is most of the movie I mean, even when it's taking itself seriously, it's like a Tarantino movie where there's always kind of like a wink to the camera

Jonathan Correia:

there's a brilliant bit where they go to a to the white town where it's just a town of white and like the scene the scenes the scenery that they have the locations they have all bright and colorful and then they go to the white town and it's just the most bland just across the board white color scheme for everything how people dress the buildings everything it's just like they say like the name of the town, they go The White Town. This is underneath it. Like there's just so much good like just energy flowing through that fell it's so much fun.

Jacob Davidson:

There has been one major horror event this month, or at least well one of a few at least echoes you know January's usually dry spell, but I think that's changing because January is now January Giallo month. You know that started by Jim Branscome from Cinematic Void and it's become a national phenomenon because now they've been doing screenings of Giallo across different theaters across the country in repertory including my hometown theater, the Coolidge corner Theatre in Brookline. And they also got screens in Chicago, Knoxville all over and they've been doing several screenings at the Los Feliz theater, including some favorites and some new movies. Well, some Giallo movies I had never seen before including Creepers, Phenomena with Jennifer Connelly, which is always great with a crowd and manages everybody always loses their shit during the corpse pit scene. And also I've decided to take a challenge. I've been watching one Giallo movie a day, every day this month.

James Jay Edwards:

Jumping back to to Netflix, I want to know, have you guys watched Don't Look Up?

Jacob Davidson:

I have.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, it's not really horror. It's kind of like a disaster movie, I guess. But yeah, it's almost a documentary. It's because it's I mean, it's supposedly is about a comet that's going to hit the Earth. And scientists discover it and warn everybody and then some people are in denial. Some people want to cash in on it. Some people are in the streets with 'the end of the world is coming!', you know, with their sandwich boards and bells. But it is so it's like an analogy for climate change. You know, it's like the same thing. This is I mean, it's very thinly veiled to it too. But it's funny because my wife had said she watched it before. For me, and then she watched it again with me. And she said, she'll, this is exactly how people would act, you know, if this was happening I'm Well, that's exactly how people are acting, you know? And not just with climate change. I mean, you, you could apply it to like COVID deniers you can apply it to so many things that are going on. It's just I mean, and it's Adam McKay the guy who did the Big Short. Yeah, so it's a satire, but not really satire. It hits a little too close to home.

Jonathan Correia:

It's like very ham fisted. It's very like when people are like, did you get the analogy of it? It's like, how the fuck could you not like, like, yes, they say comet, but it's only a word. I did like, especially looking at it from the perspective of a disaster movie, because disaster movies are always like, this thing's gonna hit later this week. It's gonna hit tomorrow and that, you know, but this one, it's like, no, in six months, and it's like, it's a long time to kind of forget that it's happening. You know, that's a long time to like, get distracted and like for things to go wrong. So

James Jay Edwards:

especially when you have you have Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence on TV every week saying this is happening. This is coming. Yeah, like, okay, cool. What's for dinner?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I really enjoyed how the movie was also about cults of personality and whatnot. Like how, first of all was not expecting Meryl Streep to be Donald Trump to be playing a Donald Trump esque character. But boy do I love a sassy Meryl Streep when she's allowed to get like that that juicy, sassy role like a Death Becomes Her. Ah, I love it.

Jacob Davidson:

And she has a tramp stamp.

Jonathan Correia:

Just fantastic. Oh, man, I love her. But it wasn't just like with her or Jonah Hill's character, but also the

James Jay Edwards:

Jonah. You mean Eric Trump?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, right. But they made one out of Leonardo DiCaprio's character because they frumped him up really? Like a lot. So it looked like a pretty average looking guy at the beginning of the movie. And then they like cleaned up. They're like, Oh, the hot scientist, the hot scientist. So for months, they're just like, building up like, oh, yeah, we have to listen to this hot scientist. Now feed us the news, but feed it nicely put it in a nice terms. You know, like, I thought, I thought seeing that evolution of someone who's like, genuinely cares about this thing. And all this stuff gets swept up in at the end of day. Also, it's just a funny movie. I thought I could see I could see the people not vibing with it or liking it. But man, the people who like did not like that movie. Really fucking hate that movie.

James Jay Edwards:

They probably took it personally.

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I mean, I did see some thoughtful critiques of it. And yeah, I mean, I said I saw it and I liked it. didn't love it. And mostly in that I didn't think it went hard enough.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it definitely was. I mean, it's funny to say this about Adam McKay but it was a little restrained. It it definitely could have hit harder. Um, something we were talking about before we hit record, and we were getting some good stuff so I want to bring it up now. Not super horror, but we talked about Marvel in the past Spider Man. Yeah, um, and because there's kind of a lack of horror movies that are out right now. Let's talk about Spider Man.

Jonathan Correia:

First of all, not horror, Willem Dafoe. Yeah, just saying it. How the fuck was he not terrifying?

James Jay Edwards:

It's been out long enough where we can spoil some things about it. Yes, pretty much every villain from a Spider Man movie of the last 20 years is in this from from the Andrew Garfield and the Tobey Maguire those villains are all in it. So you have Doc Ock, You have Electra, you have Sandman, You have Lizard? Yeah, the lizard I was gonna say Rhino rhino is not in it.

Jonathan Correia:

He's mentioned but...

James Jay Edwards:

And no vulture. But yeah, lizard and then you've got green goblin

Jonathan Correia:

Vulture was too busy being in Morbius but yeah, the film had a lot of fanservice but like it wasn't like in your face like let's stop everything going on to have this fanservice moment like the movie was pure fanservice but it like was to a point like like there was a reason behind a lot of it there was a lot of moments where it felt like it slowed down a little bit and I think it was because of one Spider Man in particular coming back

James Jay Edwards:

well yeah, that's another spoiler thing but we're gonna be spoilers for it first of all, it's been out a month and a half so we're good we're gonna try to stick to what was in the trailers at least okay the spoilers, it most of the of the big movie the big moments that you don't want to spoil the internet guessed them. Yeah. So you know, I'm going to spoil it right now. All three spider men are in it. Because what it is, is they open up doors to different universe versus so yeah. And even though you know, it's coming when the other spider man walk into that into the universe that the action participates in, you still cheer? I mean, it's still he comes in and he takes his mask off and it's not Tom Holland and you're like, Okay, that was well done. You know, I fully recognize from the eyes man. Amazing Spider Man. I have a lot of negative opinions about the Amazing Spider Man movies, but the costume looked fucking great. So I really dug that I you know, I saw this stuff where people were like, Oh yeah, they should make an Amazing Spider Man 3 and I'm like, this movies not convinced me that but what what they did with Andrew Garfield's character and him talking about rage and stuff. I was like, You know what I do want to see that Peter Parker as an adult, you know, in a movie on his own. I think that would be a lot of fun and interesting. I don't want to see Tobey Maguire spider man ever fucking again. I'm sorry. Like, I I'm glad he came back. I understand he was necessary but just like, I'm gonna say I hated his face the entire time. He just it was it was like cool. He's back and he's not really doing much of anything. And then he gets I never Yeah, just I felt almost I felt the excitement at first and then nothing towards them for the rest of movie except for just Why are you taking up screen

Jacob Davidson:

I did like all three spider man talking with each other and like just a small talk moments where some of my favorites like talking about the different villains they thought and like kind of talking about their different uses of web shooters and stuff. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

like was that comes out of your hand. Or just, I found I found a guy in a rhino suit, you know, like and Andrew Garfield's characters feeling down about himself and being Spider Man like No, no, you're great spider man. You're an amazing Spider Man.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, amazing. That was That was cute.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that was it. That was a cute little moment. But what I thought was really cool about the movie was that they critiqued what the the previous SpiderMan franchises would always do, which is killed the villain, like every time he would get murdered, and that was like, the whole thing was like, well, they're gonna if we send them back, they're all gonna die. Well, we can't do that we have to try to give them a chance. And so they're actually like working with them and stuff. And so I thought there was a lot of interesting stuff. I thought the only villain that was kind of not useless, but he was definitely like the Hulk of the group was lizard and that was like no real personality other than Him being really just a brute. Which is fine. I really dug what they did with Electro not only just giving him a much better cleaner look than you know, they did an Amazing Spider Man 2, but I really liked his whole thing of just being like, consumed by the power being like, oh, yeah, you know, maybe I don't want to not be a villain anymore. Not vibing with that, so yeah, I thought they did a really good job with the villains. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

And Jamie Foxx really got the shine there. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And there was a lot of people that were complaining about that that they didn't do much with them. But I dug what they did

James Jay Edwards:

Spider Man villains to me, they've always been kind of like the Universal Monsters. They're always somewhat sympathetic. So you know, you you sure they're villains and they're bad people. But when you see their origin you're like, you know, these are not really bad people and and this kind of, you know, like Sandman in this movie and also Doc Ock, particularly Doc Ock, Once they reason with him you know and he he you could see that these villains are not really villains just victims of circumstance

Jonathan Correia:

but even so when they do villain out like when Green Goblin is being is being Green Goblin he is fucking evil

James Jay Edwards:

yeah no Green Goblin is beyond reason he he's and he kind of becomes the main once the other villains are have been reasoned with Green Goblin is the haha zooming in you know to fuck everything

Jonathan Correia:

up but that's what's great is because Green Goblin was always Spider Man's like ultimate you know Nemesis that was always his like Yin to his Yang you know, the the one that was always behind the shadows at least in my era of growing up in the 90s and whatnot on Spider Man lore you know, it was always Spider Man versus Green Goblin some form of it which is why there's always so many different versions and what have yous with it, but yeah, I don't Yeah, there's a lot of fun. I also really loved how in Venom Let There Be Carnage. They had a post credit scene of him popping up in the Tom Holland Spider Man movies. So it's like whoa, Venom is gonna be in on this too. That's fucking incredible. And then during the mid credits of this one, they revealed that venom was just getting drunk in Mexico the entire time the events of No Way Home were going on and then just gets whooped back to his word. And that's because the Tom Hardy Venom is just such a sad sack. He just can't get a shit together. And so of course he misses out on all the fun because he's just sitting there drunk. But yeah, that was uh, that was really funny. I really enjoyed the hell out of that that we had a Sinister Six movie and Venom was just on the sidelines drinking

Jacob Davidson:

Well it's funny they there was an analysis saying that JK Simmons is J Jonah Jameson was the six in the Sinister Six even though he was technically unrelated, you know, being all Alex Jones and stuff.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, talk about thinly veiled analogies.

Jonathan Correia:

They've had J Jonah Jameson going that route for years now. Like even if you played the ps4 Spider Man game he had like a podcast and was spewing Alex Jones esque rants about Spider Man and it makes sense. I mean, like that is the 21st century version of like, you know, tabloid, you know, 25 cent at the front market. You know, bat boys come in, you know, type Weekly World News esque,

Jacob Davidson:

and as the weekly world news.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, at least they were entertaining and you knew they was fake, you know?

James Jay Edwards:

flipping to the opposite spectrum from Spider Man. Um, have you? Did you guys see Benedetta?

Jacob Davidson:

I did.

Jonathan Correia:

No, I, I just bought it on digital.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, it is... First of all, I approach all of Paul Verhoeven movies with the preconceived notion that they're going to be satire, because that's how I appreciate them. I mean, you're gonna get I mean, it's more obvious with like, Showgirls and Robocop and Starship Troopers. But little less obvious with movies like Elle. Well, this one, it's funny, because when you approach it from that lens, it kind of becomes a little like Showgirls a little bit, except, you know, the sex scenes are between two women instead of you know, a stripper and a rich guy. But um, it is it's, it's kind of a, I'm wondering how much of it it's supposedly based on actual events. And I wonder how much is actually true. I mean, it's basically about a girl who winds up at a convent and she basically takes over the convent and forces out the what do they call them, you know...

Jacob Davidson:

the Mother Superior

James Jay Edwards:

The Mother Superior. Yeah. And becomes her but then of course, there's all this little bickering infighting, you know, but it takes place at the time during the black plague, which is significant to it. So it's, it's a it Yeah, it's a Verhoeven movie.

Jacob Davidson:

And no, and it's definitely a satire because there's that whole thing where like, everything of the church costs money, like you got to pay to be a part of the convent, you got to pay for absolution. Like every thing. A part of the church costs money, and then

James Jay Edwards:

they're bickering like when the girl is going to the convent, they're like, you know, they want her marriage dowry, because she's not going to get married. They, you know, she's marrying God. And then her dad is bickering. He's like, Oh, well, I don't want to give you 150 How about 75? And they're, like, split the difference. They're like bickering over how much of her wedding dowry they're going to take to basically support her for the rest of her life.

Jonathan Correia:

But that's how the church operated for men for a long time. During that everything was taxed. Everything had a price. Well,

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, not even just then. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. Then more so though, like, pretty crazy. That's why they were able to have armies and whatnot, do the Crusades and all that craziness,

Jacob Davidson:

I'd say and one other screening I wanted to mention, like I think I went to the ultimate double feature this month at the new Beverly, I saw New York Ninja with the Miami Connection.

Jonathan Correia:

Ooh,

James Jay Edwards:

I haven't seen New York Ninja but Miami Connection. I can imagine what New York Ninja is like saying with you saying it's a double feature.

Jonathan Correia:

With any connection you whatever you think New York Ninja is you? That's not the movie. That's not it at all. It is

Jacob Davidson:

it is not what you expect. And it is and it is pretty amazing.

James Jay Edwards:

Roller Skates. That's all I have to say. roller skates.

Jacob Davidson:

To put it in context, basically, New York Ninja was this unfinished action movie that was just sitting on shelves of various archives for decades until Vinegar Syndrome got and decided like, hey, let's try make finish the movie out of this. So they took out the footage, all the audio was gone. So they had to re-dub and ADR everything. And it premiered at Beyond Fest and had it is I can only say it's something else.

James Jay Edwards:

Did they have a script? Or did they have to read lips?

Jacob Davidson:

Nope. No script, they had to read lips and just kind of piecemeal it together.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it took them two years, I think

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah two years.

James Jay Edwards:

So we have no idea if this is actually what the filmmaker intended. I mean, they could have just completely just manufactured a whole different movie out of it.

Jacob Davidson:

Kinda

Jonathan Correia:

It was mostly there. I think they they had like a few things where they were like missing shot or something.

James Jay Edwards:

But if they had to ADR all the dialogue

Jacob Davidson:

well, they were able to read, they were able to read the context of some of the scenes and you know, like read, they had like people read lips and to try and figure out some of the stuff plus, there's plot elements in the newspaper that they were able to cipher of who it is funny because like at the screen, the director, well redirector Kurtis Spieler was there. And he taught and there was like, there's like one scene where a character tries to light a candle it takes him takes them a few times. And somebody asked, like if that was the best shot and Kurtis was like, Yeah, that was the best shot we had. Yeah, it's like that. We took nine takes and that was the best one. But yeah, no, it's it that's what really adds to it because it's just pure 80s weirdness action. I don't know man. It's just it's it's a ninja in New York fighting crime

Jonathan Correia:

at one point on roller skates.

Jacob Davidson:

Roller Skates Oh my god. I lost my shit at the roller skates

James Jay Edwards:

considering some of the Gangs of New York

Jonathan Correia:

in The Warriors?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, they used to roller skate the punks.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah. And it's funny too because there's a there is kind of Warriors type gangs in this movie too except they don't really have a signature theme like some of them got like, jocks like the Clockwork Orange guys and other dudes have cowboy hats and face paint and like those, like clear Halloween masks, so it's like there is a real signature theme. It's just like, a bunch of random goons.

Jonathan Correia:

It's like it's what they got at the costume store for the cheapest literally every single one was like we got to make these guys look different. Got them cheap cowboy hats. We got to make these guys look different. Cheap clear Halloween masks like every time

James Jay Edwards:

there's a gang in the Warriors that dresses like me in the 90s you only see him one shot towards being there walking toward the camera. They're wearing khakis with like red Hawaiian shirts and fishing hats and Correia's laughing cuz I think he knows the gang I'm talking about and that was me in like the mid 90s

Jonathan Correia:

That that checks out because we're was in your band like kind of pop punk and

James Jay Edwards:

whatnot. We we were the definition of pop punk. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

So that checks out that checks. And we

James Jay Edwards:

played with every ska punk band that came through San Diego. We were on the bill. We were the token punk bands. So yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

what was the meme that was going around for a bit where it was like punk life sucks rage against the you know the system. emos, oh life sucks and I'm emotional about it.

Goths, this. Ska:

Life Sucks with play some trumpets. Something ike that.

James Jay Edwards:

I saw this in something like, Ska is the music that plays in a 12 year old kids head when he gets extra mozzarella sticks. Oh, yeah. That one? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I actually watched a film for the first time last night it's a bit It's from 2015. Why did as a double feature because Lindsey was like, what two movies you really want to watch right now. And of course I said Heavy Trip because Heavy Trip, you know, the Finnish heavy metal comedy is still one of my favorite findings of last year. But then we watched 2015's Demon. Have you guys heard about this?

Jacob Davidson:

Which one was that?

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, wait, I think I have is that that's the foreign one with the guy who becomes possessed, like on his wedding night or something?

Jonathan Correia:

It's a Polish possession movie. Yeah. They mentioned it in and what prompted me to was to watch it again, as they mentioned in the folk horror documentary a few times. And yeah, it's about this a bridegroom that is supposed to inherit this land when they marry and ... You know, it's the day of his wedding and he's digging in the backyard and finds a skeleton. So as the wedding's going on, he's becoming he starts off having like visions of this dead woman. And then he eventually becomes possessed by her. And it turns out that

James Jay Edwards:

during the ceremony, he's possessed

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, yeah, so like the families try. It's like a dark comedy. But like really fucked up

James Jay Edwards:

you're kind of living fast and lose with the term comedy.

Jonathan Correia:

No, it's a dark comedy. It's very, very dark but it is

James Jay Edwards:

but it how comic it is.

Jonathan Correia:

But the whole movie plays out like a romantic comedy of something weirds happening at a wedding. So we get in the family's trying to hide and keep the festivities going. So every time like he starts having like, you know, a weird possession moment. They're like, Alright, bring out more vodka, and everyone's just getting hammered.

James Jay Edwards:

They do that they try. They try to play it off. And they're like, all let's have more fun.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, but it is super dark, because the whole movie is about denial. You know, the family's denying that he's being possessed by this Jewish woman who was killed during the Holocaust. And it's almost like the entire town is denying its participation in it and denying its history with what happened during World War Two. And like, there's like, oh, yeah, if there's a skeleton in the thing, we'll deal with it later. And then he just like, like, it keeps going and like the possession is like a big part of the movie, but it's not like they're trying to go for exorcism or Exorcist or anything like that. You know, like it's it's very meticulous, just how everything plays out. I really, yeah, it really it knocked me on my ass. Like, when it was funny, It was hilarious. And when it dived into those dark themes, like it went hard.

James Jay Edwards:

I haven't seen it since 2016. You know, went since it was new, that I don't remember it being that funny.

Jonathan Correia:

You got to rewatch it, man, I'm telling you, it's one worth revisiting. But yeah, it's all it's all about Dybbuks. I think it's Dybbuk. Yeah. That's the type of possession that story that it's based on. And there's a really good character on it that they refer to as the teacher and he's kind of like the last surviving Jew in town. And so he's the one that brings in that history and talks about like, oh, wait, you're so and so I remember you when I was a kid and like, you see that like dark history coming up and everything. Oh, it's yeah, it's a roller coaster. Highly recommend seeking it out. I think it's on Tubu, at least Amazon Prime I believe you can definitely rent it or buy it digitally.

James Jay Edwards:

Well there is one other big release actually probably the big horror release. And it's going to segue into our main topic.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that's why we haven't mentioned it yet.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, you probably haven't you guys seen Scream? Well, yes. All three of us have seen Scream

Jacob Davidson:

Do you like scary movies?

James Jay Edwards:

We're going to talk about basically the whole Scream franchise but let's start off by talking about the new one

Jonathan Correia:

Scream Five!

James Jay Edwards:

Yes. Scream five. But you know, in the Scream the tradition of Candyman and Halloween it's called Scream.

Jacob Davidson:

It's a requel

James Jay Edwards:

it's a requel yeah, that's what they call it in the movie, which, you know, when they first announced that Scream Five was going to be just called Scream. I was just like, ah, can we like that's, it's so aggravating. It's a little aggravating. But then like, you watch the movie and you're like, oh, shit, you were even critiquing requels in the in the title.

Jacob Davidson:

And really

James Jay Edwards:

noticing that the the middle of the M, it goes a little deep. So they're like, oh, no, that's actually a Roman numeral V. It is called Screen five. Okay, you're reaching

Jonathan Correia:

Layers. And the second half of season five of Breaking Bad was all Walter White's dream. Yeah. Sandy wasn't real in Grease.

James Jay Edwards:

Anyway. What did you guys think of Scream? I'll go first, because I might not be as enamored with it as the rest of the world. I did like it. I liked it a lot. But on the Scream scale, I think it's my fourth out of five. We'll do our rankings in a few

Jonathan Correia:

really??

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Actually, I'll do my rankings right now. It goes 12453.

Jonathan Correia:

Really????? I actually went and and see the thing is, and I actually wrote this in my written review, an average Scream movie is still better than most modern horror. Oh, yeah. Because I went and I rewatched three and four. Before this one, I've seen one and two, one I've seen dozens of times. I was about to say twos pretty high on your ranking? Have you watched it recently?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Oh, yeah. I like two, um, two I've seen probably at least a dozen times, um, three and four when I went back to rewatch them. I don't think I'd seen them since they were new, because I know, I'd seen parts of them, like the opening scenes of both that somehow I had seen. And also I remember the Carrie Fisher scene from three, but the rest of the movies. I just I don't think I'd seen them front to back since then. And yeah, I really enjoyed four, like a lot. And three, you know, I mean, I I do like three. I like three a lot. But it's the my least favorite of the five I think

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, that's the thing. Oh, every Scream movie is, is good to varying extents.

James Jay Edwards:

Yes. Very, the thing that bugged me about the new one, and this is going to sound like I'm being a negative Nancy, because I did really like it a lot. But I could have done without some of the the long drawn out. Okay, we know Gail and Dewey love each other and it didn't work out. We don't need a 10 minute conversation about it. And it was the same thing with the sister Sure. Like, okay, once we figure out that she's an estranged Sister, you know? Yeah, let's have Ghostface kill some kids. And the thing is Ghostface has got to be one of the meanest angriest most vicious slasher killers ever. And he gets more and more angry with each movie. I mean, you can feel the anger when he's killing people. It jumps off the screen. This isn't just like, you know, an emotionless Michael Myers or Jason Vorhees.

Jonathan Correia:

He is proving a point.

James Jay Edwards:

Yes. Yeah, it's an exclamation point with each stab.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, cuz Ghostface no matter who's behind the mask, the killings and who they're killing. There's always a point behind it. There's there's a statement to be made. It's never just like, Oh, here's some random babysitter. Oh, hey, these people just happen to walk in my camp. It's always no I'm gunning after this person at this time. For whatever convoluted giant fucking scheme this ghost face has. And, and I gotta say, Scream Five has the most brutal and angry of the ghost faces. Like there's scenes where you just see him going at it where it's just hard to watch.

James Jay Edwards:

I think that the order of brutality goes 12345 Because every movie, he steps it up a notch with just how angry he is

Jacob Davidson:

brutal.

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know if it's if it's fully there in three though. I just re watched all five the other day and I don't know, I feel like three lost a little bit of that brutality. Just a little bit. I know.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. I mean, yeah, three is kind of an outlier in that in many regards. But no, I do agree that like it's also kind of a ground it also provides kind of a groundedness to the Scream movies because you know, this isn't some supernatural serial killer. Somebody's back from the grave. It's just some wacko in a Halloween costume with a hunting knife

James Jay Edwards:

and it's a different wacko or wackos every movie to it's so funny because like you're going through five movies. And you know in general the killer always dies so you know, it's a different killer. Oh, yeah, yeah. Movie killer or killers because we know Scream is famous for, you know from

Jonathan Correia:

there's always two.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, well, there's not always

Jonathan Correia:

but that but that's one of the things there's always two except for I think only one movie had one killer.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, well yeah, it did kind of switch around. But um, and I was actually lucky because that last year they did a Scream-a-thon at the new Beverly so I got to see all four well then Scream movies. Back to back to back.

James Jay Edwards:

I remember we you told us about that. Then we're like, what movies did this show? Not realizing that the Scream-a-thon was a Scream

Jacob Davidson:

Scream marathon. It's in the title.

Jonathan Correia:

It's a scary movie marathon. What movies are you watching? Scary Movies! Which now I think there's as many Scary Movies as there are Scream movies.

Jacob Davidson:

No. Damn, there are five scary movies, right?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, but there still aren't as many Scream movies as there are Stab movies.

Jacob Davidson:

Right? There's like eight or nine stab movies now

Jonathan Correia:

was I alone? In wanting to see more of stab eight like that little bit they showed of the metallic face ghost face and with a flame thrower? Like, can they have like a fake trailer on the blu ray or something? Please? Because like I need more of that footage.

James Jay Edwards:

I was reading this thing about all of the voice cameos. And I think they said it. Was it Matthew Lilliard that is the voice of of the chrome.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, yeah. Looked at I looked it up. He's He's the voice of flame thrower Ghostface

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. And I guess Drew Barrymore is the the principal's voice over the intercom toward the beginning. Yeah, and I guess they got pretty much everybody that because it minor spoiler there's a character in the movie named Wes. thinly veiled. Yeah. And at one point they toasted and they say 'To Wes', and I guess for the the ADR for that they got pretty much everybody who has ever worked on a screen movie with Wes Craven to do to give give a 'To Wes', you know, to Wes to Wes and, and they just put that in to this one group scene. So you're hearing pretty much everybody who ever worked on a Scream movie toast to Wes Craven, which I thought was pretty cool.

Jacob Davidson:

That's really sweet.

Jonathan Correia:

And that was I think the biggest accomplishment of Scream Five is the fact that it not only is just a great Scream movie, like it continues you know, critiquing where horror genre is at the time continuing the stories going on feeling like the next feeling very much so like the next logical step in the franchise. But they really did do a good job of keeping the legacy that of what Wes Craven built with the franchise going making it you know, they even first thing that pops up at the end 'For Wes', you know, and it really did feel like that love was there from everyone in front and behind the camera.

James Jay Edwards:

Not just the love was there, but the respect is there because it's directed by the Radio Silence guys who also did Ready Or Not. And basically, the Scream movies to me is some of the most confident and just the filmmaking is just has a point to it. And like from the very first shot of any of the movies, you're like, Okay, this movie means business. And they kept that feeling which is not something a lot of filmmakers could do so I mean, these guys did a great job at base I mean they kind of made it their own in places but they still had so much respect for the style that Wes Craven created with these Scream movies that it doesn't even feel like they switched directors. Yeah. And that I mean that's awesome because you I mean if you have a Scream movie, then it just becomes the Friday the 13th franchise the Scream we've only been Wes Creek well you know, you know what I mean? Where like there's like a different director each movie

Jonathan Correia:

but but also like that's that's very interesting because the Scream franchise, looking at Wes Cravens filmography their shot, their play out are just very different than everything he's ever done. He's done before but he's also one of those directors where it's like he does that he'll switch between styles and like different ways. So it's hard to pin you know, he's got a few trademarks he's got a few you know, go to tools in his belt. But for the most part, Wes Craven always did something different so Scream while it was very much a Wes Craven film was a very like different style and taste than what he normally would do, which I always respect the hell out

Jacob Davidson:

of. Yeah, and he was a real filmmaking chameleon because you know he started off doing you know low budget yeah, I forgot what I was gonna say you know, low budget. Horror like Last House on the Left but yeah, I forget I always forget about the pornography part.

Jonathan Correia:

You always forget about the pornography.

James Jay Edwards:

Hey, when you got to make a buck

Jacob Davidson:

you got to start somewhere.

Jonathan Correia:

When you got to make a book film people fuck, you know?

James Jay Edwards:

Not everybody can get their start on Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.

Jacob Davidson:

Like Mr. Romero, yeah. But yeah, no, because yeah the 70s he was doing stuff like Last House on the Left and Hills Have Eyes that he did slasher movies in the 80s like Nightmare on Elm Street and Shocker.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, the Deadly Friend.

Jacob Davidson:

And then in the 90s he did more social horror like the People Under the Stairs and then he started getting meta with new with New Nightmares. So like he his filmography is all over the place. And I mean that in a good way. Like he made all kinds of stuff.

James Jay Edwards:

And like Correia saying, each movie or series I should say, has its own stamp and the Scream ones to me is such a strong one. And I was really glad that the Radio Silence guys kept that because it wouldn't feel like a Scream movie without I mean you can put the ghost face costume on anybody but if you don't make it look and feel like a Scream movie, it won't be a Scream movie.

Jonathan Correia:

They even said that in scream five with the stab eight thing they were like oh yeah, they tried to do something too different they tried to go to a you know fire where they and all this stuff and it's like

James Jay Edwards:

Uber Ghostface

Jonathan Correia:

it was a it was like the Radio Silence guys were saying like, we know what we could have done and we know how we could have fucked this up really bad but we didn't do that guys. We didn't

James Jay Edwards:

Scream movies to me are and this is probably why I've seen one and two so many times because they're they're just so watchable. You know, if your flipping channels and you come across Scream, you're gonna finish it, you get sucked into them. And this one is like that, too. I mean, I you know, I like I said, I kind of sound a little more negative on it than I am. Because I really did enjoy it. And it is like all the others. It's immensely watchable. You're not bored. You're not you know, you're engaged with it the whole time. And it is a hell of a horror movie.

Jacob Davidson:

And And also another thing I liked about this new Scream movie is that it definitely focused a lot on kind of horror today. But they also examine kind of trends in film in general and fandom you know, like just yeah, you know, like there there is an obsession by certain sections of fandom about certain films that can be toxic and

James Jay Edwards:

I thought of Correia when they did the whole elevated horror thing. I'm like, I can't wait for Correia to talk about

Jacob Davidson:

the Babadook!

James Jay Edwards:

also a little bit of that was too heavy handed too like when they're when they're sitting around discussing the rules as they call it go with Jordan Peele rules, obviously. It's like,

Jacob Davidson:

I mean that I mean, that was it. That was a joke.

Jonathan Correia:

You name a single a single goddamn Scream movie, where especially when they're explaining the rules, where it isn't heavy handed as fuck. Yeah, like and that's when you mentioned earlier Wes Craven being very confident with his filmmaking and like in the filming of it, you have to be with how ridiculous and silly the whole, just the concept of, oh, there's a killer, but he's abiding by these arbitrary slasher rules. That's always been a silly thing. And it's and it's only gotten sillier with he goddamn movie, especially with three by the time you get to three. And it's like, oh, it's a trilogy, all gloves are off. Like

James Jay Edwards:

the fact that they keep going back to the 'I'll be right back!' in every single movie. Someone says that like that

Jonathan Correia:

Like that one song they always use too

Jacob Davidson:

Red Right Hand

James Jay Edwards:

red right hand. Yeah, I saw Scream, the new Scream, it was a press only screening there were like maybe 12 of us. And I kind of wish I could have seen it in a full theater. Not enough to actually have gone to a full theater, you know, and risk Omicron but I wish that COVID didn't exist. I could have seen it in a full theater because the Scream movies. I remember I saw scream two on opening night. And it was like the Super Bowl. It was it was actually a lot like the opening scene where they're in the movie theater for stab. And because you know, is packed, you're throwing a beach ball around the theater had a person dressed in Ghostface that was sneaking up on people. You know, in retrospect, I'm like, That guy's lucky you didn't get punched, but it was just so it was and then you know, the lights went down the movie started and basically people were watching what they were just participating in and it was incredible on like, you know, they didn't hand out those face masks, but there was a guy from the theater dressed like it so the Scream movies are so much fun in a crowd and I wish I could have experienced that but like I said, not enough to have actually risked it.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, we saw that Mission Tiki so seeing that the drive in and it was raining just a little bit. So we had so we couldn't hear other people but there was a few moments where you heard someone scream in their car, it was nice.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I saw it at a press screening too like it was for the premiere over in Century City. And yeah, I mean, it was def...It was also mostly I feel like horror journalists. So it was kind of cool to see in that context. A lot of oohs and ahhs and AHHs and yeah, so although I agree that it's definitely a crowd movie, and it would like when I saw the Scream marathon, you know, that was, you know before Omicron and when people were pretty much vaxxed so it was a blast to see with a full house

Jonathan Correia:

All right, I'm gonna ask it we already got James's official rankings which were what again

James Jay Edwards:

12453 are mine. Okay,

Jonathan Correia:

Jacob, what's your rank of the Scream movies?

Jacob Davidson:

I've thought about it and I think I'd have to say 12543

Jonathan Correia:

Okay, and I just want to remind everyone this is just personal opinions. This is this isn't us bashing anything. We love every Scream movie. It's just preferences.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I love I love them all. Just you know it's and honestly I probably change it here and now then

Jonathan Correia:

I can tell you with my recent reviewing of the first four and going into five my I had opinions change because my rankings now are 15432.

Jacob Davidson:

Ooh

Jonathan Correia:

I gotta say for me at least in recent rewatching I appreciate it three a lot more mostly because I finally got over Courtney Cox's bangs, you know, they're not that bad. Every you know, I was one of those people that was bashing on it for years they're not that bad.

James Jay Edwards:

That's only because you've seen Jennifer Lawrence has bangs in Don't Look Up

Jonathan Correia:

you know what you get what you see it in movement and then the movies going it's not that bad. But yeah, production stills don't do the do those bangs justice. But I feel like

James Jay Edwards:

some of the pictures where they're making fun of her bangs are photoshopped, because I noticed it too. When I was watching the movie, I'm like, here's not that bad. That's what I see. Like they've cut them up like higher like photoshop or something. Maybe

Jonathan Correia:

But yeah, for me too. Like, don't get me wrong. The opening of two at the movie theater is is a fucking phenomenal follow up like that. Definitely. They felt like oh, shit. We're doing it again. But these are escalated. And then we got to the college. And then I just felt like everything slowed down hard for me. And then they did that stupid Top Gun thing with Jerry O'Connell. And I was just like ughh

James Jay Edwards:

I could see he was the film student and they're like, oh, what's he doing? Top Gun 1986.

Jonathan Correia:

With that one, I felt like, with Scream two, I felt like the movie was too aware that it was a movie, you know? It weirdly enough, like more so than three because I always felt like three kind of became more of like a satire of the satire with it and doing like going even further with the tropes and everything. But like two was the actual like, it became the thing it was satiring and it became too sequely, you know? And then like, it was that Top Gun scene. It was just like, oh, yeah, cuz we're doing a movie because it was a we're gonna do a movie because we're movie kids and we're in a movie and it's just like, it was that that seemed like Yeah, but I still enjoyed the hell out of it. And again, Scream two great reveal at the end. I love it. I love

James Jay Edwards:

it. The only one who when the killer in five asks her who plays Casey Becker in scab? I'm the only one who's like Heather Graham, Heather Graham, and she had like look it up on her phone.

Jonathan Correia:

No, no, I was I you know, I would have loved it even more if they went who directed the first stab movie but I just wanted them to go Robert Rodriguez. Yeah, I always I always love that little bit. I think it wasn't four they revealed that it was Robert Rodriguez that directed stab and then I really dug four I had a new appreciation for it because you know I always thought it was okay you know, but I really loved how four continued just like in in that critique on fame and like that 15 minutes of fame and like, how what that meant in the new internet age and everything I really really enjoyed that and then yeah, three was just was just silly and so much fun. Like it was oh, over the top at times the Carrie Fisher cameo was fantastic, Jay and Silent Bob just randomly pop in. It's like good job. Miramax You finally got Jay and Silent Bob in a horror movie. You did it

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, that three is definitely it's like the Scooby Doo or you know Hardy Boys one you know whether it's a clue.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, but but it was so much fun with that like, oh, it was a point where we're watching three and like they go to the Secret Screening Room and Lance Henriksen characters house and they like lock the door. It's like a volt lock. And I like turned to Lindsey and was like, oh, yeah, that's definitely like the room. That's definitely the rape room. And she was like, Whoa, spoilers. I'm like Lance Henriksen said like not 20 minutes ago was basically saying was was like saying it, you know, like just saying like, Oh, yeah, things got a little out of hand at our parties. And then when you had parties or have a vault door, like, come on, there's not much other intentions there. But also weird that that film was produced by the Weinstein's and it was like, hard on like what Weinstein was doing for decades like that. That 2020 context makes that very uncomfortable

James Jay Edwards:

was three written by Kevin Williamson.

Jonathan Correia:

I think that was the one he didn't write. Yeah, I'm

Jacob Davidson:

pretty sure that wasn't him. Oh,

James Jay Edwards:

I would say maybe he was trying to warn everybody.

Jonathan Correia:

Cuz I think I think he had a different idea for where they were gonna go with three and having it be a cool thing. And then that became that show The F ollowing. At least I think that's what it was. Well,

James Jay Edwards:

we're running out of time, but we wanted to talk about the legacy. And I could tell you, the legacy, it was immediate, because right after Scream, it seems like Scream came out. And then you had and a lot of this had to do with Kevin Williams. And speaking of, because he also was doing Dawson's Creek at the time. So he had his finger on the pulse of you know, what teens wanted?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, that reminds me, they had Dawson's Creek in Scream

Jonathan Correia:

and Scream five. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, they had Yeah, they would make jokes of Dawson's Creek in a lot of his movie like, you know, like, because he did I Know What You Did Last Summer and but like, The Faculty was Kevin Williamson. Yep. And so Scream kind of kicked off this whole and we talked about it a little bit when we had when we had Anca on for the I Know What You Did Last Summer TV show. Um, there was this trend and the funny thing is the posters all look the same. They have a picture of all these pretty young cast members on them, you know, in Scream actually kick that off. But um, that kind of kicked off the whole the second wave of the slasher movie, you know, that 90s wave right which you know, I we're kind of still in it now, although I don't think they use quite the same pretty casts as they used to. But I mean, Wes Craven's kind of lucky because he had two genre defining series, you know, with a Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream, you know, and by the time he made screen, people kind of thought he was washed up, you know, but then he comes out with Scream and you're like, Okay, no, he's still got some gas in the tank.

Jonathan Correia:

That was only because New Nightmare didn't do well at the box office for whatever reason. Like it just did not click with people at that moment. Cuz new do ahead of it's really Yeah, but yeah, it did. It was because I, I've been reading the book about all the different versions of Freddy vs. Jason that were in development for years. But when they get to the timeline, where New Nightmare comes out, like it basically throws a huge wrench in everything, because it was just like, oh, maybe this isn't as profitable of an idea, if Craven couldn't even make money with a New Nightmare. But yeah, at the end, we still feel the legacy. How often do we see I mean, like, that was the film that made that kind of film, critiquing mainstream, you know, like it, it helped bring terms like the final girl and, and you know, those types of like fans knew of the tropes and whatnot, but it helped get that to a broader audience. And so it not only forced us to look and reflect like, oh, wow, they a lot of these films are doing the same things, but it forced filmmakers to go, okay, how can we not do that? How can we critique that, granted, critiquing the critiques became a whole thing. And we had like a whole slew of horror films that were being meta for the pure purpose of trying to cash in on being meta. And we're still dealing with that to this day.

James Jay Edwards:

But, but let's face it, there's a little bit of Randy and all of us, as film geeks. Yes. You know, you know, these are the people who are screaming at the screen, Heather Graham.

Jacob Davidson:

And, as an aside, I did want to bring up that I thought, Jasmine Savoy Browns performance as Mindy Meeks Martin was a definite highlight of the movie. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Randy's Niece. Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, she's in a Yellowjackets, right? Yes.

James Jay Edwards:

have you guys watched Yellowjackets?

Jonathan Correia:

I love Yellowjackets

James Jay Edwards:

Probably should have covered this before.

Jacob Davidson:

We should have talked about it earlier.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I just finished binging through it and holy shit the thing is, it's not it's not at all what I thought it was because I thought it was gonna be all Lord of the Flies and cannibalism, and they haven't even gotten to that part yet. Thank God for another season because you know where it's going but they haven't gotten there.

Jonathan Correia:

And someone Someone told me they're like, ah, Riot Girl Lord of the Flies. And I was like, Oh, well you just described like dream of mine. Like I'm like, That's exactly what I want.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, you've gotten his little snippets in The Lord of the Flies. We haven't even seen any of it yet.

Jonathan Correia:

but it's still good

James Jay Edwards:

I can't wait for the next season I'm bummed that I have to

Jonathan Correia:

they they they took their time setting up all the all the good stuff that we really want. But also, when we stop recording I have to talk about you guys watch the whole season right? Yeah. Okay, we're gonna talk about it after we're done recording maybe we'll do a minisode. But uh, yeah, so the legacy of Scream...

James Jay Edwards:

that like our Yellowjackets detour. Okay. Now we return you to your regularly scheduled podcast.

Jonathan Correia:

But I honestly really hope that we I will. There's two things that I hope are one, I hope we don't have to wait so long for Scream. six. But also, I am more than okay with getting a new Scream. movie every 10 years if we keep this up, because I think that was one of the things that with the original Scream. trilogy, that kind of made it kind of because it felt burnt out by the time you got to Scream. three, you know. And, again, so all fun movies, great movies, love them all. But you can definitely feel a burnout by Scream. three and then Scream four reinvigoration and five, super reinvigoration. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

I would rather wait 10 years and have them be this good that have one every year and have it decline like Saw

Jonathan Correia:

but maybe not 10 years, like maybe every four or five because I mean, there's enough to critique every five years, like come on, like I get it, but But yes, I as much as I don't want to wait so long for a Scream. I'm glad that they if they do take the road to avoid a stab eight, if that makes sense.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, but yeah, no, I was gonna chime in that, I think, you know, the legacy of Scream is that it defined a decade like, when people think horror in the 1990s That's, that's probably the first one that comes to mind.

Jonathan Correia:

Immediately the image of Drew Barrymore with her phone playing with a butcher knife. That's, that's 90s Horror, right there.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, honestly, you can, for lack of a better word trigger. Any horror fan, all you have to say is, 'what's your favorite scary movie'? And they know exactly what it's about. I mean, that kind of power. Yeah, that kind of legacy. I mean, I guess you could do the same thing with (Friday the 13th noises) But you know, it's, it's the same kind of thing. It's like, the power that the movie had just from that. One question you can ask people. I mean, you kind of have to ask it in the question that voice too, though. You can't just say hey, what's your favorite scary movie? You have to say? What's your favorite scary movie?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I would. I would go on record to say, What's your favorite scary movie is just as iconic as a Ke Ke Ke ha ha or the Halloween theme? You know? Or Freddy Krueger saying 'it's primetime Bitch'.

James Jay Edwards:

'Welcome to primetime bitch'.

Jonathan Correia:

I damn it. I fucked it up.

James Jay Edwards:

We'll see it's not as iconic because you got what's your favorite scary movie? Yeah. All right, I think we have we beaten this dead horse. At least without spoiling anything, because Scream is one of those movies that Yeah. Yeah, you have to dance around things because you don't want to spoil stuff. Right? So yeah, let's get the hell out of here. Um, what did you guys think of Scream and let's hear your Scream rankings. So yeah, hit us up. We are back. We never really went anywhere so if you've been monitoring our socials you could have hit us up anytime. Our theme music is Restless Spirits. So go check them out the vinyl for their new record just hit up

Jonathan Correia:

mine just shipped the other day. Um,

James Jay Edwards:

so did you get the red one or that or the black?

Jonathan Correia:

No, I missed out on the red. But yeah, I'm still excited.

James Jay Edwards:

Super limited, the red ones. Our artwork is Chris Fisher. So check him out. You can find us on the socials at pretty much @EyeOnHorror everywhere. We have Facebook, we have Twitter, we have Instagram. We have what is the thing you call a Linktree that links to all of them.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, so we have a Linktree up on all our social media so you can see all our different social medias, get in contact with us. Our email is up on there. We're going to be adding a tip jar soon. So you know we've been going at this as our fifth season now. We do everything out of our pocket in our free time and are just looking to expand a bit. So if you like what you what you hear, throw a buck or two, if you want to we'll give shout out to names. If you want one of us to say something tip a couple extra bucks. You want shirtless pictures of Jacob, Jacob, what's the market price on shirtless pictures of you

Jacob Davidson:

(Sigh) Fifty Dollars

Jonathan Correia:

Fifty dollars! That's a steal folks. And you don't even have to go to Only Fans. You don't need an Only Fans account to get a shirtless picture of Jacob Davison

Jacob Davidson:

Geez

James Jay Edwards:

and for another 50 I'll keep my shirt on. So you want to see the fat hairy pale guy. And this is I mean, we we love doing content for you guys, but it's kind of a job. I'm not gonna say that this is the direction we're heading but this kind of a pilot thing. We've been discussing Patreon which we will have bonus episodes and this is what I'm kind of excited for possible commentaries. So if you ever wanted a commentary of the three of us for Rampage, yes. So we go Patreon

Jonathan Correia:

but every every dollar spent is going to go directly into the podcast we when we started Eye On Horror, what four or five years ago now. It was never we never thought about making money. It's always just been for the hell of it for the fun.

James Jay Edwards:

There will always be a free version even if something does happen and we go Patreon this podcast will always be free all the extra stuff you can get if you if you pay us

Jonathan Correia:

we just want to be able to reach more folks and to bring you guys more awesome guests and I don't know stickers give give out pens I don't know like the you know

James Jay Edwards:

some of this money will go right back to you guys because we you know, free stickers and pins and stuff.

Jonathan Correia:

For $100 you get a t shirt of Jacob shirtless.

Jacob Davidson:

The irony

Jonathan Correia:

the ironing?

Jacob Davidson:

the irony because I be shirtless on a shirt

Jonathan Correia:

like that RiffTrax of Roadhouse if Patrick Swayze wore a shirt in this movie, and have a picture of the shirtless Patrick Swayze.

James Jay Edwards:

We're recording this fairly early in the morning, but I think Correia is already drunk.

Jonathan Correia:

Drugged on caffeine and nicotine.

James Jay Edwards:

We're gonna get out of here. So, yeah, it's good to be back. I hope that you enjoyed as much as we did. And we will see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison

Jonathan Correia:

and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

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For Wes: Wes Craven's Legacy
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The Legacy of Scream
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Reinvigoration of the Scream franchise
Scream: Defined 1990s horror and teen slashers
Tip Jar Donations ($50 for shirtless Jacob pics!)