Eye On Horror

Dysfunctional & Demented Dinners

November 22, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 19
Eye On Horror
Dysfunctional & Demented Dinners
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

With Thanksgiving coming up the boys discuss some of their favorite dinner scenes in horror. From Texas Chainsaw Massacre to Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 to You're Next (seriously, what holiday were they celebrating in that one?!?!?!). The boys also review Hypnotic (on Netflix), The Beta Test (In theaters and VOD), Jacob attends Severin's Secret Super Pop Up, and more!

Excuse the stuffy noses and brain farts, we all got mucus brains from our separate colds. 

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James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is episode 76. Otherwise known as season four episode 19. Think I got those numbers right. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me, as always is your other host Jacob Davison, how're you doing? Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing good. Just excited for the Thanksgiving season going to be visiting my family soon.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, cool. You're going back east again.

Jacob Davidson:

Yep. Going back east again.

James Jay Edwards:

All right. You're going to visit The Archive?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, you bet your essay.

James Jay Edwards:

Of course. That was a dumb question. Also with us yet again and for always and forever is your other other host, Jon Correia, how you doing Correia,

Jonathan Correia:

doing good. But also we should know that when Jacob says he's going home to visit family, he really means he's going to the Vinegar Syndrome headquarters.

James Jay Edwards:

Vyn Sin is family

Jacob Davidson:

is visiting family.

Jonathan Correia:

It's all about chosen family. Vinegar Syndrome very much. So is a trip as a family.

James Jay Edwards:

So what's what's been going on? For you guys? You can see anything good?

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. Um, so in my house we're huge. Mike Flanagan fans of course, of course. And Lindsey, my beautiful partner pointed out that Kate Siegal does movies that aren't directed by Mike Flannigan to get the other what? Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, she's not a Sheri Moon Zombie.

Jonathan Correia:

But you know, I made that comparison. I was like, she's definitely not a Mary. She may. Sheri Moon. There we go. Brain farts. Why are we recording so early? Um,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, cuz I have to work in 15 minutes.

Jonathan Correia:

So, but yeah, Kate Siegal. She is she does more than Mike Flanagan movies. She was actually in a Netflix movie recently called Hypnotic. Where it's, it stars her. Jason O'Mara, who does a lot of voice acting for the DC animated movies. They was directed by Matt Angel and Suzanne. Coote. And you know what, it was a solid little, a little little piece it was about. She's someone who is going through depression and in a rough time, so her friend recommends her to a therapist who does hypnotherapy and it kind of turns it a lot of the a lot of the movie I will admit I kept comparing it to the TV show Hannibal because there's a lot of like screwy stuff happening with the hypnotherapy and all that stuff. Of course, Kate Siegal gives a great performance very haunting at times. But the way like parts there was like some weird pacing issues I had with it, but it was it was fine. If you're looking for like a kind of B level type of Hannibal Lecter. You can definitely have a lot of fun with this one. I think Jason o'mara had a lot of fun, just kind of like hamming it up being like, Oh, I have control over you now. SWAT thing and he would say something and they would freeze, you know, there. Yeah, but it was it was if you're looking if you're bored on Netflix, it's fine.

James Jay Edwards:

Have either you guys seen The Beta Test?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, actually, I just saw that last week. What did you think? Yeah, it took me a little bit time to think it over but I thought it was very interesting. And yeah, it's just it's very hard to describe because the way I was kind of log lining it to friends is that it was kind of like Swimming with Sharks meets. Shoot, I'm blocking the name of the Tom Cruise Stanley Kubrick movie, Eyes Wide Shut eyes wide shots a Eyes Wide Shut.

James Jay Edwards:

That's a better logline to me. I was saying it was American Psycho meets The Game.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's just such a weird psychological thriller. It hits all these beats, but also that it's you know, talent agency movie.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I wasn't a huge fan. I mean, I it's a well made movie. I just I didn't I couldn't tell if it was supposed to be a comedy like, oh, yeah, no,

Jacob Davidson:

it was definitely meant to be funny.

James Jay Edwards:

I compare it to American Psycho because that is the director writer director also plays the lead role. Jim Cummings. Yeah. Like you say it's this it's this he's a talent agent. And he gets a an invitation to a no strings anonymous sexual encounter. And he's got this fiance who I think is the best role in the movie she's Virginia Nukem who is also the wife in The Death of Dick long so this poor woman Nice, better relationship choices in movies. But uh, he's given off Patrick Bateman vibe. So the whole thing he's like, basically the movie is watching him go crazy. But he's trying to figure out because clearly this anonymous sexual encounter is preying on his mind and and he's going through like, he's tracking down like the envelope manufacturer and the messenger like he's trying to find out who's behind this thing, kind of like Michael Douglas in The Game. But I couldn't tell I mean, with American Psycho, you know, it's a satire. This one it's like, you I, I couldn't it's got a weird tone to it.

Jacob Davidson:

I definitely feel that but it definitely was aiming to be a dark comedy to at least an extent. So but yeah, no, it's it's definitely a heart an outlier of a movie, but yeah, I think I think it was pretty interesting. And it was definitely entertaining.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it was entertaining and and it's the it's a good link to it doesn't overstay itself.

Jonathan Correia:

But wait, it was a Jim Cummings movie like the guy who did The Wolf of Snow Hallow. Right. And Jim Cummings is in it, but he's not playing a cop. I I've thought at this point, he wouldn't do any roles unless he played a cop because he's at least in two of his movies. He's played a cop and then he was a cop and Halloween Kills. Yeah. And so really not a cop in this one. Okay. He kind

James Jay Edwards:

of becomes a detective though. And he tells people he's

Jacob Davidson:

a fake speaker being a cop. They're an FB edit FBI agent.

James Jay Edwards:

Technically, he's a cop and a fed to get what he wants. So yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

well, yeah, well, he repeatedly tells people he's like all these fake professions or to try and get ahead on his weird obsession.

Jonathan Correia:

Got you so so yeah, there's still an element of him playing a cop and so in some Yes.

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, it is kind of a detective mystery story. I guess. He's playing

James Jay Edwards:

playing a cop.

Jonathan Correia:

Playing play. He's a he's a man, playing a cop playing a man who's trying to be a cop and wants to be a cop. But really, he's a cop.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I lost you. But I think you're right. Oh, no, I

Jacob Davidson:

got mucus braid. Okay. Um, as for me, I went to the Severin shock super pop up the other day, you know, the mystery screenings they do to premiere their black friday titles. And oh, man, they got some crazy shit.

James Jay Edwards:

I saw that Bloody Pit of Horrors one.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

that is a crazy movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, man. It is bananas. It's like this 60s Or sorry, said I think. I think it's 60s. Yeah. Yeah, six as a 60s Italian kind of torture murder.

James Jay Edwards:

Like a marquee decide kind of a thing. Yeah, yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

And that's just really funny though, because the killer who's called the Crimson Executioner is this big buff dude played by a professional wrestler who oils himself up and like tortures people.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say he looks like a professional wrestler. He's legit a wrestler? Yeah, I

Jacob Davidson:

believe he was played by a professional wrestler. Yeah, he looks like one. Yeah. It is also kind of weirdly meta because the victims are this like, film crew making a horror movie. You're doing like kind of a horror theme photoshoot. And then they start getting picked off one by one with medieval torture devices and stuff. It's and also there's this ridiculous see where this woman is tied to a giant metal spider web with a mechanicals spider with like claws and stuff is like attacking her. It just is just a wild movie. And let's see. Okay, and the other two movies were pretty ridiculous. Or well, we're pretty wild, too. Because the let's see the second movie because it was three movies. And the rest of the movies were revealed through trailers. So the other two movies they screened were this Indonesian psychological thriller from the guy that did, like Impetigore and Queen of Black Magic, Joko Anwar, it's like about a sculptor who's having marital issues. And then he starts getting paranoid that his friends and family are kind of plotting against them to get these weird messages that somebody needs his help. And it is, it's almost two hours long. So it was a bit of a drag at times, but it it did have a hell of a payoff. So it was kind of interesting to see that one unfold. And then of course, the big one. Like the one that like really blew up the audience. Was Night of the Demon. Are you guys familiar?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Night of the Demon the singular, right?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Although not, not the classic. Turner, or Val Lewton produced one. This is the grungy 1980 Xploitation super gory video nasty Bigfoot

James Jay Edwards:

Whoa. Okay, no, that that one I'm not familiar with.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. I kept getting confused with that, because I was like Night of the Demon that already got a release. Bigfoot. So

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, it's weird. They have the same title. But yeah, at some point, they went to the duction history because it was one of those things where it was originally trying to cash in on the kind of big foot craze of the 70s. And then, you know, it's 1980 and slashes a big so the producers are like, Okay, we got to add like a bunch more scenes of Bigfoot going around and killing people horribly. So there's these ridiculous kill sequences, but mostly just out of context, because it's like flashbacks are like unrelated should just Bigfoot, like, scared like rips a dude's arm off. And Bigfoot kills a dude with his own axe and at Bigfoot Also, apparently, was the first person to you know, like, take somebody to sleeping bag and impale them on a tree brand. So he beat Jason in that one. Wow. Yeah, so it's just this crazy as Bigfoot movie

James Jay Edwards:

wasn't there a sleeping bag kill in Prophecy?

Jacob Davidson:

There was although that in that case, the bear just like swung and obliterated that person in one in one go with its claw?

James Jay Edwards:

Is was that before or after? Night of the demon?

Jacob Davidson:

Actually probably might have been around the same time.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, Prof prophecy, I think was 79. Maybe Yeah, so

Jacob Davidson:

this one. Yeah. So this would have been about the same time because neither Diem was shot around 7879. It wasn't released until 1980. It's one of those things, but I wonder

James Jay Edwards:

who worked on both movies and spilled the you know what they did? And

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, but anyway, so yeah. And it's like about this professor and his students like going to the woods to track down Bigfoot. And there's a Bigfoot cult and there's a woman who was sexually assaulted by Bigfoot, and it's just crazy as Bigfoot movie and yeah, it was a notorious video nasty it was banned in several countries.

James Jay Edwards:

I feel like this movie was made for me and Correia because it's got big foot and it's kind of cold.

Jonathan Correia:

And it's a video nasty, so it's just ticking all the boxes.

Jacob Davidson:

If it makes Maggie Thatcher mad,

Jonathan Correia:

I'll do anything that got real quick. I refuse to watch the crowd because I don't want Gillian Anderson associated with Margaret Thatcher at all. I don't want that ruined.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that gives me very confused feelings that get that no,

Jonathan Correia:

not happy. I don't care how good the performances anyways back to murder. Bigfoot cults. Murder.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And also on top of that, they release a bunch of merch with Night of the Demon including like a demon mask a Bigfoot statuette a from the most infamous scene in the movie where Bigfoot rips a dude's dick off. Nice.

James Jay Edwards:

This Wait, the statue is of him ripping dudes the dick off

Jacob Davidson:

Well, hold on Ed. Yeah. Yes. And I actually want a pretty cool prize from the raffle they did. They did a novelization of Night of the Demon. Like what they did with Cruel Jaws. So yeah, it's a book, the book version of the notorious video nasty.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you ever gone to something like this? And not one something? No.

Jacob Davidson:

It's like my grandfather always said never leave anywhere empty handed.

Jonathan Correia:

I almost I almost went to that. But there's been a cold going around, unfortunately.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say I think I think all three of us are sick. Well, I'm gonna hopefully I can edit it all out of the final but um, we're all sniffling and coughing and sneezing. So if you hear sniffling, coughing and sneezing we it's because it was too hard to edit out.

Jacob Davidson:

Like, I just I think it's just allergies. And also, I'm getting I think I'm still kind of getting over my COVID vaccine booster.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, those are both rough. I actually took the opportunity to give two recent kind of, well, not super recent, one of them two movies that I that I was like, You know what, I think those movies deserve a second chance. One of which was kind of not really horror, but Michael Mann's Blackhat with Chris Hemsworth as like a hacker trying to stop a hacking terrorist. Basically this movie is what if hackers was like a legitimately good thriller. And it's it's honestly like, really good. I was I was really digging up on how that movie they did a good job of building the tension of hackers just doing social hacks, you know, where you just kind of like ask the right questions and like not really having to do the whole code thing. It was it was very interesting, very worth going back and rewatching with 2021 eyes, but I did also, I think I think in all Honestly, I think it was the first time I ever watched Van Helsing. Oh Jackman.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, I remember that one.

Jonathan Correia:

Listen, I got that one. I was ready to be like, Yo, maybe everyone was wrong about this one. And those those opening scene that was in black and white happened I was like, Man, I think everyone was wrong about this movie. This is pretty dope. This is a lot of fun. I kind of dig where they're going with this. And then like the rest of the movie, just like did everything it could to just like undo all that goodwill. It built up with me the first like 10 minutes like the dialogue ah, the ending a

James Jay Edwards:

huge Ackman choose every stick of scenery in that movie, he is just a total ham.

Jacob Davidson:

Everybody does that. The

Jonathan Correia:

funny thing is, is at its core that did not feel like Van Helsing at all, like, Van Helsing was always this like, was an academic who had to become a badass because his academic studies led him to the world of Dracula and others, right? And so first and foremost, he was always a nerd. This guy wasn't a nerd. He was he. And I was also very confused on how everyone was confused about Dracula. Like, there seemed to be a whole thing in the beginning, where it's like, Hey, there's this guy. And he's, and he's, you know, torturing and terrorizing Romania right now. And they're like, Oh my God, who is this? I don't know. We think his name is Trakula or something. And like, so it's like, sweet. No one knows who the fuck Dracula is. He's been around for 400 years in this story. And then like they get there and like, oh, yeah, no, Dracula can't be killed because of Baba Baba Baba. But it's like, Wait, so you did go about trek? Did you not know about Trek or do you do know about trek? I don't understand what the fuck is happening. Don't even get me started about Van Helsing stupid werewolf superpowers. You know I get it. I get why people are angry at this movie. Like it's got me fired up.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I saw at high in high school. And even then I was like, wow, this is just over. Over done.

Jonathan Correia:

They it seemed like everything in that movie was was like, like a lot of the decisions were made. So that they could see that video game developers could have material for their levels. You know, everything from like, the little weird minion things that they never discuss. Really, they're just like, oh, yeah, those are Dracula's minions. Well, what are they? So over here we have werewolves like they just kept avoiding like explaining what that was or his babies. I did think they did some really cool stuff with Frankenstein's monster. I really enjoy him. A lot of the stuff with that about how a they let him talk which was which is very rare in adaptations. Even though in the original book Modern Prometheus he just fucking rants

James Jay Edwards:

like yeah, he talks almost too much and yeah, he's

Jacob Davidson:

a talker in the room.

Jonathan Correia:

That Adam which is Frankenstein's monster, and the original book goes on more monologues and that original book that a fucking Mike Flanagan miniseries. But yeah, dude, there was so much potential there was so much like I feel like if they actually like approached fan like, I like the idea of like having, you know, following his event like I don't think it's a bad idea to kick off like a universe or to kick off a franchise surrounding Van Helsing. I just think the approach was wrong. They were trying

Jacob Davidson:

to kind of try to be too much Wolverine.

Jonathan Correia:

I think they were trying to be too much Batman really with it? When really I think Van Helsing needs to be more of an Indiana Jones type like, character.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, you have to Captain Cronos Vampire Hunter.

Jonathan Correia:

Exactly. And I think and I don't think that they had too many monsters. I don't know what the fuck was the point of Mr. Hyde. In the beginning, that was a that was just a really weird choice thing.

James Jay Edwards:

Just trying to cram as many Universal guys in as possible was Invisible Man in it. No.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. UYou just didnt see him

James Jay Edwards:

isn't there the whole

Jacob Davidson:

time? Yeah. Yeah. It's like it's kind of funny because this was kind of their first attempt that dark universe type of thing and then they did the other dark universe thing several years ago and that didn't work out and then then yeah, then then we have the Invisible Man A couple years ago. Now they're going for like the legit scary universal monster reboots. Like they got that Wolf Man movie coming and the Dracula movie.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm just bummed we're not going to get a Russell Crowe Dr. Jekyll movie because you know it thank thanks to the Tom Cruise Mummy that tanked we'll never get to see russell crowe's Dr. Jekyll again

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, but we have Noah and that's like the best watching him flip flop emotionally and all that you know, one second going from, like going from loving father to trying to murder his like pregnant daughter in law or whatever that was. Does no one remember Noah and Russell Crowe tried to murder a baby.

Jacob Davidson:

Like gonna say I missed that one.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm Zack, is that Noah and Noah's Ark. You mean? Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. Darren Aronofsky's Noah remember? No,

James Jay Edwards:

I thought that was Ridley Scott was really really Scott do something similar to that

Jonathan Correia:

he did Exodus Gods

James Jay Edwards:

Excellent. Okay, got it. Yeah, these these things. Because I

Jonathan Correia:

Noah is the better movie, mostly because it's just it's Russell Crowe on a bowt just like yelling a lot and murdering babies. He tries. It makes a valiant attempt. Like I remember seeing that in theaters and go Holy shit. I came here to watch like a biblical epic because sometimes, you know, stories in the Bible can be epic and they're fun. But

James Jay Edwards:

not to spoil mother! but what's up with Aronofsky and babies? Is he just not like them?

Jacob Davidson:

The whole thing?

Jonathan Correia:

I think he went through a period I think he was going I think he was trying to process some stuff about like, not wanting another kid or, or just like being over it. But like, yeah, the ferocity of the ferociousness in which Russell Crowe approached that baby in Noah was yeah, it was it was jarring. Again, no, Noah great. People go see that movie. It's it's it's basically the story of Noah's Ark, but like, through the lens of like a Christopher Nolan Batman movie. It's a lot of fun.

James Jay Edwards:

You're gonna say told by Aronofsky who? Yeah, this is the guy who brought you Requiem for a Dream. So you know what kind of movie you're getting and Black Swan.

Jonathan Correia:

So Russell Crowe tried to murder a baby. isn't that far fetched? Right.

James Jay Edwards:

Speaking of boats. I'm segwaying from Noah. Have you do you guys watch a Great White?

Jacob Davidson:

Uh, yeah, I did.

Jonathan Correia:

The Great White.

James Jay Edwards:

Great way. It's the new it's the new shark movie on Shudder.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I honestly didn't really care for it. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

I It's funny, because the first two thirds I really like, you know, because it's about this pontoon plane expedition that gets terrorized by a shark. And the first two thirds of it I thought was really just a fun little B movie, but the shark is terrible. The shark is some sci fi network. CG. Yeah, it's yeah, it's like Shark typus shark, you know? What was the hurricane one? I'm totally blank shark NATO shark. Yeah, it was like some some shark to push shark NATO style CG which is pretty bad. And then the last act, I'm going to spoil a little bit of it, but Okay, so this, a character drowns and another one swims down to them, breathes into their mouth, and brings them back to life. Bullshit. First of all, even if that could happen with oxygen, you're breathing carbon dioxide into this other person. Oh, my God. Okay. So anyway, I just spoiled a cliffhanger in Great White, but I don't think anybody's gonna care.

Jacob Davidson:

See, and as for me, been going to the Alamo a lot because I've been doing a bunch of Godzilla screenings. It was Godzilla

James Jay Edwards:

day.

Jonathan Correia:

Do you like Godzilla? What do you like Godzilla? Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

I do I do. I do love Godzilla it. Yeah, no, cuz I have always gotten to a couple of screenings, but I was able to see the original 1954 Godzilla, which has a new 4k restoration and one of my personal favorites from the franchise Godzilla vs. Hedora. AKA Godzilla vs the Smog Monster, which was a huge source of Kinder trauma for me, because Hedora scared the hell out of me. When I was a kid.

Jonathan Correia:

Hedora is genuinely creepy. And, and it is a really great card. Did you watch the short that they recently put out of Godzilla vs. Hedorah?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, the updated one with the costume? Because Because yeah, yeah, because they had Godzilla Final Wars and Godzilla fought Hedora, but it was only for like a minute. So they wanted like an actual fight. So they did a recreation with Godzilla vs. Hedorah and like a full blown battle. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

that came out really good. That was tight, like 10 minutes long, but real solid.

Jacob Davidson:

I dug it. But yeah, it was nice to see those theatrically. And, again, you know, just such a whiplash, you know, kind of looking at the franchise because you got Godzilla in the original 1954 version, who's terrifying and he's the embodiment of nuclear explosions and weaponry. And then you got the later movies where Godzilla fights other monsters and stuff, and it's cool.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, it's kind of like how you and I went to that marathon of like four or five titles where we started off with Gojira and then I think it ended on Godzilla vs Megalon. The one with Jet Jaguar Yeah, but in like a movie or two after Gojira it was Godzilla is revenge the one where it's the kid imagining Manila million gods Oh, God and like they put that like cartoon or who their buddy, what's wrong with you was your first show log. Let me tell you the story about God about Monster Island.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that was weird that they did the David and Goliath voices.

Jonathan Correia:

That's, that's exactly what it was. It was a but yeah, what a stark difference going from Gojira which is a gorgeous Movie. with like, really great like It's like People always complain that the humans aren't don't have good stories in Godzilla movies especially with the monster verse ones go back to the original Gojira there's a great plot about arranged marriage and

Jacob Davidson:

Serizawa juggling with the ethics of his of his weapon.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah and the beautiful laid out and developed love triangle and stuff like there's some like really great stuff in there. And then just and then a few years later you get to Godzilla's revenge with the Oh Boullier hurting you? Oh, let me and then they just like reuse clips from like, destroy all monsters and stuff. Godzilla teaching Manila how to do smoke rings. It's a little frustrating, but I got

Jacob Davidson:

it. Yeah, that's why they had to give it such a like bombastic title because it's Godzilla is revenge and attack. All monsters attack anything. Oh, man. That sounds cool. That it isn't. Yeah. And so we can have J horror I also watched this interesting Japanese horror movie I've been it's been on my watch list forever that but it finally got a digital release. It's called Ghost Master. It is crazy. It's like the small Japanese film crew making like a Japanese rom com. And the assistant director wants to be a great horror director like Toby Hooper. And there's a conflict and the script he wrote comes to life possesses the lead actor and the lead actress starts killing everybody Evil Dead style.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, okay. Yeah, wait, they but they were trying to make a romantic comedy.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, they were trying to make a romantic comedy but the assistant director wanted to be a horror director and he he's his brown is just browbeat and abused by like the director and the producer and he and like it like it is weird stuff happens like it like they get their blood gets on the script. And the script comes to life and possesses the lead actor. And he becomes like a dead died and he starts killing everybody in these ridiculous over the top way is

Jonathan Correia:

Fuck yeah. What where can I find this movie?

Jacob Davidson:

It's available to rent on like Vudu, YouTube, all kinds of stuff.

Jonathan Correia:

And it's called what Master?

Jacob Davidson:

Ghost master ghost passe

Jonathan Correia:

Okay, that sounds right up my alley.

Jacob Davidson:

Yet it has a lot of references to Western horror and outright references to particularly Toby Hooper, like the director was definitely a huge fan of Toby Hooper, like Life Force is in fact a plot point of the movie. So it's kind of like One Cut of the Dead meats Evil Dead.

Jonathan Correia:

One Cut of the Evil Dead.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's not one cut. But you know, the same kind of

Jonathan Correia:

vibes. vibes. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

it was a lot of fun. And it had some pretty wacky kills. Especially because like the is like, again, like there's the whole rom com stuff kind of bleeds into it mixed with the gory kills. So it's pretty, it's pretty wild.

James Jay Edwards:

I finally caught up with a movie that Jacob has been raving about. I saw Censor. Yes. And it, it pretty much lived up to the hype. It's a it's a crazy, it's hard to describe. I mean, it's basically about a woman who does ratings for the British Film Board in the 80s. So in the 80s. Yeah, yeah, it's a fantastically retro movie. But a movie comes across her desk that that just, I don't really want to spoil too much about it. But she basically needs you investigate this movie. And she does. And, of course, it's a horror movie. So it doesn't go well. It's a it's a it's just a crazy movie. It's not really what I expected it to be. It's one of those movies that like the whole time I'm like, where's this going? I mean, is this really going to go there? And where it ends up is definitely worth the price of admission. It's a I don't know if I'm as in love with it as Jacob is. Is it still your number one of the year?

Jacob Davidson:

Not sure about number one, but it's definitely my top three.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, it's I mean, it's, it's probably in my top 10. I don't know about top three. Because you

Jacob Davidson:

know, all right. Well, that's a whole other conversation.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah, we got to start making those lists soon. Don't wait, it's already we do. Wait.

Jacob Davidson:

I was in November.

Jonathan Correia:

I was gonna say it's already November. It's already mid November this so it's coming out like days before Thanksgiving, guys. What is time? What are we what are we doing?

James Jay Edwards:

Time is a flat circle. Time is a construct invented by man and the planets.

Jonathan Correia:

Actually, before we start recording this change that guy to a good thing. Which might actually segue to our next topic. All right, let's, well, you know what concept of time

James Jay Edwards:

today's topic is to quote Correia, dysfunctional demented dinners. And I'm actually going to let him introduce it because I'm not entirely sure I understand the assignment. So We're being in it today. So take it Correia.

Jonathan Correia:

I was trying to go for like a guy fairies, you know, dinner diners, drive ins and dives. There's three Ds in there. So it kind of works. I guess. Um, yeah. Well, I mean, what today Today is Monday, but it's it's a week prior, but the episode comes out next week, which is Thanksgiving week, and typically on Thanksgiving, people have dinner with their family. So I thought let's talk about dinner with the family. But with the family we actually care about IE horror movies. So yeah, just basically wanted to kind of go over some of our favorite dinner scenes, some iconic ones, some really gross ones. What are some that you want to attend? What are most that you want to avoid the EverLiving fuck out of? And what is the most uncomfortable dinner scene horror or not that you have ever seen. I wanted to start off this discussion, mainly to point out Texas Chainsaw Massacre.

Jacob Davidson:

The classic

James Jay Edwards:

the gold standard,

Jonathan Correia:

One and two have two of the best dinner scenes ever and they are so different the original it's so it's so minimal. There's like a few goofy shit hanging around the you know the table, but it's creepy. They have the grandfather like suck suck the blood out of the girls finger it's like such an uncomfortable scene and it goes on forever or at least it feels like it. And the stark difference between a Texas Chainsaw Massacre to where it's down in this like almost like Ed's underground. It's an underground it's kind of like if Hanna Barbera actually had a budget with their villain layirs and it's just like over the top and goofy. And like there's there's so much more color and all that and it's just great because you know I always hope that if I have someone interrupt my family dinner that it's Dennis Hopper just with a chainsaw going fucking nuts you know? But you know I don't have family dinner so I don't think that's gonna happen. But yeah, just a stark difference between the two secenes one is like totally played for just bone chilling creeping awkwardness and the other one gets there. It definitely gets there but it's way more over the top and cartoony. I love that because those are that's the big complaint Everyone always has with Texas Chainsaw Massacre t2 like why would you go for a comedy with that? It's like how could you follow up Texas Chainsaw Massacre with the same thing you have to go more extreme with everything. And I think Hooper did that perfectly with TCM 2

James Jay Edwards:

That's kind of the difference between Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Part Two anyway is the second one is much more cartoony and over the top anyway, the first one is almost like a documentary at times. It's so gritty. And they shoot on eight or 16

Jonathan Correia:

they I believe they I know they shot it on tail ends so and I think it was 16 I please correct me if I'm wrong. But I know it's one of those films kind of like the Evil Dead where they shot it on tail ends. So the unused strips from other productions, which gives it like a more gritty feel and look to anyways because it's film that's already gone through canisters has been cut and might be a little bit exposed. It's already kind of fucked up. So yeah, they definitely had that like dark or not even dark. It's a very bright movie. It's just grainy. It's just a really, really

James Jay Edwards:

really Yeah, it's it's it reminds you of those old war films that you'd see. You know, coming back from Vietnam kind of thing you know, we're handheld camera. You know, you can see the green on the footage. Yeah, but the the second Texas Chainsaw Massacre is so much more polished.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh yeah, it's grander scheme. And of course it's a comedy dude. It opens up with with leather face hanging off of a truck with like a body in front of him. And he's using it like a puppet as he swipes his over the top giant chainsaw that is so not fat. Like it's not phallic at all. chainsaws are not phallic and TCN

Jacob Davidson:

and set to Oingo Boingo No One Lives Forever.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Which is just such a great scene of him just like that over the top Chase I just killing 80s yuppies set to go boy go good.

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah, those those are some dinner parties. I would not want to be a part of

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, well. Depends on what side of the table you're right. If you're wanting to souliers maybe if your guests if the soldiers know.

Jacob Davidson:

Also. So just a quick aside like it's ever pointed out but in the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, like I think Grandpa is like a vampire or something.

Jonathan Correia:

Cat I never got like the sucking of the blood. Yeah, I get but like, that was one of those things where it because I've heard that theory of like, is he a vampire? Is he not? And it's just like I Why? Why would you make him a vampire? I don't know.

Jacob Davidson:

He's some kind of ghoul, like a ghoul. I

Jonathan Correia:

could I could accept I guess I don't know I just watched Monster Club so I'm all like it was a chat MK not a Chad MK No. Who knows?

James Jay Edwards:

The the movie that Correia and I were talking about time being a construct for which has actually what brought it up is he says the dinner scene I say it's a breakfast scene, but Alien. And I will tell you, the reason I think it's a breakfast scene is because they just woke up from their hyperspace nap. They're breaking their fast.

Jonathan Correia:

And here's the reason why I say it doesn't matter. Because time is, is a construct. We our perception of time is due to rotations around the sun. Guess what, there? There is no rotation of sun out there. Thus time is irrelevant. Also, you can eat breakfast foods, whatever, you can eat dinner foods, whatever, I will fight anyone who says I can't eat spaghetti at six in the morning.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I'm gonna have to go with Correia on this one.

Jonathan Correia:

But also I just find it funny that that scene is always referred to as the chestburster scene and it's never the the dinner scene or the breakfast scene you know, because that's that's most of the scene is them sitting there eating

James Jay Edwards:

actually, you know what? I agree with Correia now to now that I'm thinking about it because this happened after Kane woke up from BFA, but they didn't just wake up from there Yeah, no no no yeah they Yeah cuz I'm thinking of a different meal scene where where Parker's like all confused for coffee first so when the good thing in the ship, you know, so I'm getting I'm getting my meal scenes in Alien mixed up so you're right, that probably is it dinner scene. Even though Kane just woke up? It's his breakfast.

Jonathan Correia:

We don't have to stick just at dinner. We can talk about creepy breakfast scenes too. I'm sure there's a few there

Jacob Davidson:

are like oh, yeah, like in Freddy's Revenge where the cereal box explodes.

James Jay Edwards:

But the thing about Alien about the chestburster scene is at the time, it was so shocking. I mean, that's the movie and still to this day. That's the scene in the movie people talk about Oh, you think of Alien? You know, you think of the chestburster and it's so much so that they parody it and Spaceballs?

Jacob Davidson:

Actually got um, John Hurt. Yeah, they actually got John Hurt to revise it to do that. Oh, no, not again, not again.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, it's so great. And they even made a whole documentary about it. Memory: The Origins of of Alien was half that documentary. He's just dissecting that scene, which is really fantastic.

James Jay Edwards:

They didn't tell the actors how much blood was gonna be there. So with Veronica Cartwright, when she gets splattered with blood, her reaction is real. And if you look at her, she's it's like the shock screen. She was pretty she was she was really grossed out.

Jacob Davidson:

Understandably so. Yeah. As for me, when it comes to dinner scenes, the first one that came to mind was Dracula. From Dragon, I guess a couple different versions. But the one that I was thinking of was from Francis Ford, Coppola's Dracula with him, and Jonathan Harker is remembered a lot like he's got him over and he's like, treating him, which also ties actually, oddly enough to another movie, Shadow of the Vampire. Because one of the most memorable things about that is like they did a scene where they're sitting with Max Shrek, the guy who plays Nosferatu in the movie, and in this context, he's an actual vampire. And they asked him what he thought of the book Dracula. He said, It made him sad, because in the context of Dracula, Dracula serves Harker himself, because even though he's a count and a Lord, he doesn't have any servants. He doesn't have any family. He's by himself. He's alone. And he has to treat treat this man because he's got nobody else. So it's like, he may be the vampire lord of darkness, but he's all by him by his lonesome. So he has to like feed and take care of this air, you know, like, treat this guys as guests. So as far as that was kind of an interesting perspective, plus, or gave us the line, you know, I do not drink wine.

Jonathan Correia:

You can't find good help and Transylvania. That's just that's just fact. labor shortage.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I mean, they the villagers all shot him.

Jonathan Correia:

Dracula's just in his castle going sorry. I can't serve you as quickly where we're experiencing a labor shortage.

Jacob Davidson:

Right now? Yeah. No, nobody wants to work for me.

James Jay Edwards:

Maybe if he paid them a living wage?

Jonathan Correia:

Maybe if you didn't hate though. It's no but God that's a beautiful comparison. No one wants to work these days. Everyone's too lazy. No Dracula, you keep eating people.

James Jay Edwards:

So someone's got a meme that. God. I have a question for you guys. What holiday are they celebrating in the dinner in You're Next?

Jacob Davidson:

Um, yeah, I think I just assume it's either kind of like a Thanksgiving thing or if it's, it seems like just kind of a general family reunion type situation.

James Jay Edwards:

I think it might be an anniversary, maybe the parents anniversary. cuz although home for it but yeah, but it's but it has kind of Thanksgiving vibe. You know, they all bring their girlfriends and wives and whoever and they're spending the weekend there. That's definitely a dinner. I don't want to be at

Jacob Davidson:

Ty Wessler that the hard way?

Jonathan Correia:

Did they purposely keep that like, as vague as possible? Because I know there's like sometimes like, that's a choice like kind of like how It Follows the girl who's always on her phone, it's like a shell phone. And I did that to try to not date the movie, but instead it became like the most distracting prop ever.

Jacob Davidson:

It's like a weird alternate universe.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, It Follows. They purposely made it so that you couldn't figure out what it is because the cars are like all over the place. I mean, some of them are like, super modern Priuses. And then you've got your classic darts, you know, I think they purposely made it with It Follows. Where you couldn't date the movie. I mean, all of the fashions and hairstyles are real generic. You barely ever see adults. It's all the kids. So I think they they purposely made it ambiguous as to they made it timeless. Yeah. And they may have done the same thing with you or next. They may have said, you know, if we don't name the holiday, people will watch this at Christmas at Thanksgiving.

Jacob Davidson:

It makes sense. I mean, it's all about the family. And three and the three home invaders.

Jonathan Correia:

Speaking of family, one of the the dinner scene that I have the hardest time watching because there's some dinner scenes where it's you know, it's gross, but it looks appetizing. Like, you know, every dinner scene of the TV show Hannibal he had no, it's people but it looks so good. And they shoot. So Josh is on the opposite spectrum side of the spectrum. was Peter Jackson's Dead Alive, where they have that one dinner scene with the priest and the main characters trying to make it so that it doesn't no one knows that his mother is dead. And

Jacob Davidson:

oh, and just to just an aside that it's not a priest. It's like the representatives from the good homes organization, New Zealand, you know, it's like one of those fingers like yeah, you know, it's just one of the figures like, are like from, like, Hot Fuzz. You know, like the best looking town type thing is one of those. Like, it's like about home decency or some something weird like that again, and the old lady's falling apart literally in front of them.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. And then she squeezes the like rat bite on her inner arm and just squirts pus across the table into their soup and the woman eats

Jacob Davidson:

custard. Custard There we go. Oh, yeah. Oh, man, his queasy just made me think about it.

Jonathan Correia:

That was the first movie to make me gag. Like now that legitimately made me almost puke. And I applaud Jackson for that because especially when I first saw it, I had a very Iron Stomach. But yeah, that's one of the that is definitely a dinner I do not want to attend. That was nasty. Oh, yeah. I will do like custard so I don't know. But now I can't trust custard

Jacob Davidson:

yeah just especially around old ladies and conversely that you go back to his earlier work there's also Bad Taste where humans are going to be the dinner to the aliens and they've got that what they've got that one dude like the salesman like tied up with an apple in his mouth like a rose pig true that true that a lot of the early Peter Jackson movies have a lot to do with food and people and people as food

Jonathan Correia:

his first three were very like about excess you know whether it was food or sex you know with Meet the Feebles it was a lot of all that and ties to violence which were all very done very over the top like he was he was only like a stone throw a stone skip away from like trauma level of Audacity.

Jacob Davidson:

You no doubt no doubt. No doubt.

Jonathan Correia:

Gotta love the early 90s New Zealand splatter films?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes. On the other spectrum, just in terms of the most awkward dinner scene like the the one that comes to mind for me would have to be of course Hereditary. You know the whole I am your mother dinner scene. Oh, I remember that.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, yeah, that's thing we've been discussing a lot of ones that have a lot of like crazy supernatural or serial killer stuff. Just plain old awkward family dinners like hereditary or chosen family with The Invitation.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

That was one of the most awkward like even before they got into like the the weird culty Why don't know what I'm still thinking trying to figure piece together like what was going on? They was just awkward. Everyone just kind of like side I And like side, you know, mouthing each other and stuff like, that was comfortable, but the wine look delicious.

Jacob Davidson:

Yes. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

as far as watching and noticing little things, the any of the meals in Midsommar Right, you know, bringing up another Ari Astor. You noticed, like, when when when Christian is eating, you know, he finds hair in his food and that you notice his drink is a little more red than the others. Yeah, and if you're paying attention to like the tapestries and what's going, you know what's going on with it? Oh, and sometimes it takes a second watch to realize that but you're like, Okay, this is that that's a good detail.

Jonathan Correia:

There. There's another thing from that from that girl. That's That's it is drink that Yeah. Is not kosher. But the meals in that movie, they look so delicious. pies were shit. Yeah. The portions which just like come on. If you're gonna be tripping balls all day. You need to have a little bit more than a tiny meat pie.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, shrooms

Jonathan Correia:

where's the vegetables? Where's the sides? He'll, you know if it was me pies look good, but like a side of like, some like roasted asparagus would have paired perfectly with that. Maybe they didn't grow asparagus. Oh, I don't know. So we're all just gonna ignore

James Jay Edwards:

the bear then. Oh, did they? Did they eat the bear? No. They dressed Christian up in the womb. Right. Right.

Jacob Davidson:

They will they sewed them into that. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, the movie kind of ignored the bear to it just showed a bear in a cage and then like, didn't show it again until Christian was in it at the end.

James Jay Edwards:

So there's a payoff. I just love how they point that out. Like, you see. And they even say though it's a bear. Um, you know that the camera is going past a bear in a cage. And one of the characters actually says, we're just gonna ignore that.

Jonathan Correia:

And they did still still a better payoff than what they did with the Oracle.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, yeah, that yeah, that went nowhere. That

Jonathan Correia:

was that's still my my only gripe is what what like, why didn't you do a little bit more like I thought they were gonna expand a bit more on the Oracle in the Director's Cut and they didn't.

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah, I really don't understand what that what that deal was

James Jay Edwards:

I with airy astor's movies. I always avoid trailers like the plague. And I was remember being really pissed off that I think it was Fangoria posted a picture of that Oracle on the cover of their magazine before the movie came out another cool shit. I just had this movie spoiled by the frickin Fango cover. No, I didn't. Not at all.

Jonathan Correia:

Just just looked like a blonde version of that guy from 300. You know? The trader? leper who was he? Or?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, the hunchback? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

So great movie. Just wish they did a bit more with the Oracle.

James Jay Edwards:

I love Midsommar. And I think the director's cut is better. Even though it only really adds two scenes. It's just deliberately slower. And for me to say that makes a movie better is huge. Because I mean, my favorite thing about Censor was it's 84 minutes long. Same with same with Saint Maud, my favorite movie of the year so far. It's like 83 minutes. I mean, that's you can watch that twice in the span of one Director's Cut of midsommar.

Jonathan Correia:

I love Saint Maud so much and I can't believe they're just dumping it getting I'm going to take a moment. They're dumping Saint Maudd on Blu Ray, it hasn't really gotten a theatrical run and it's getting like a bare bones blu ray, not even getting a 4k release got

Jacob Davidson:

a theatrical. It was it was at the driving.

Jonathan Correia:

Like very limited. But like,

James Jay Edwards:

it's already when I when I tell people that's my favorite movie of the year. All of the festival people are like, Oh, but that's from last year. That's what I'm saying. You can't say that. It's like oh, it's not from last year excited and frickin see it last year, so shut the fuck up.

Jonathan Correia:

It was released this year. You know it but yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it was released in January. I remember saying is it too early to decide my favorite movie of the year. And it still is my favorite movie of the year.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm just upset that like there's a lot of really good movies that aren't getting 4k releases. You know? I am a fuck I'm doing it again. I don't know how to pronounce that movie. James Wan just did Malignant malaria Malignant Goddamnit now I can't watch it again. Malignant it's not getting a 4k release. The Night House didn't get a 4k release Saint Maud not getting a 4k release. Zola which was one of the best looking movies of the year not getting a 4k release. How can I tell that bathroom seat who is the hot mess without seeing the toilet bowl in HD and 4k? UHD Come on. But yeah, it's it. I just it's ridiculous. How many how at this point where we are in releasing of disks. It feels like if you're not putting it out on Blu ray In 4k, you're just kind of dumping the movie. And that sucks because there's a lot of really good movies that really do deserve the best real home release that can get. And I think Saint Maud is definitely one of them. I still have my studio canal steelbook that I got at the beginning of the year or end of last year. But I want to 4k release, you know, right. And read.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, yeah, back to our topic. I just want to mention it because we also run out of time here. In fact, we are out of time, but um, one one that I want to mention my favorite dinner scene, the Rocky Horror Picture Show. Oh, yes. And it's for personal reasons. It's my favorite because it's one of my favorite movies, but just just the fact that you know, it's kind of a birthday dinner more than anything else because they are happy birthday. But then when you when they reveal what they're eating, and you know, it's a 45 year old movies, so I'm gonna say not meatloaf again. But yeah, that that's that that's probably my favorite dinner scene of all time in a movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And also on this and also in the stage show. Apparently, the joke line that they added was when they asked Dr. Franken for what they're having for dinner. Frankfort just says Meatloaf.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, that would have been added after because meatloaf. Well, he was in the stage show. But in in the stage show. Edie and Dr. Scott are the same actor. Oh, so So meatloaf played both Dr. Scott and Eddie when he was the actual Oh, when when he was in the state show.

Jonathan Correia:

And I hear he was pretty upset about that. They weren't doing that for a picture show that they were hiring a different actor. Would you understandable? That's you know, less days you work but I think for at least a cinematic version of it. I think it works a bit better on the live on the stage version. It's hilarious seeing the switch between the two you know and having to do the costume changes and all that.

James Jay Edwards:

Well there's plenty of time between Eddie getting killed and Dr. Scott showing up so there's there's lots of time to do makeup and costume. I think it would I like the way they did it in the movie because the guy who plays Dr. Scott is incredible. But I do think it's a fun visual gag for you know, yeah, it's, you know, cuz it's his nephew. So you know, they should look alike. And, you know, plus meatloaves doing the Eddie song. Dr. Scott song is I mean, meatloaf is an incredible singer. I mean, he honestly it's Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

but also just like, as soon as he brought up Rocky Horror, I revealed meal. It's just the weirdest like cheapest. Like, it's like, it's like they were they took like some actual like butcher meats, and then they're like, let's add in some stuff to make it look like it's Eddie.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's put it in the leather jacket. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

It's just the silliest thing. And that's why we love Rocky Horror. It's just a silliest thing.

James Jay Edwards:

I just love it because as soon as they one by one realize what they're eating, they all kind of put their their their their utensils down and they're getting grossed out. And Rocky the monster who you know, was born just a few hours before he just keeps showing up doesn't get

Jacob Davidson:

it. And it has that great scare card. You know, the Rock and Roll dog dog? Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, that's when he finally pulls the tablecloth off because the the meal is under the table. And

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

And electric carving knife.

Jonathan Correia:

It just goes to show that thanks to society, we don't eat people. You know, without society, we would eat people and not be fazed by it apparent.

Jacob Davidson:

It's taboo. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

life's pretty cheap for those types. i Let's wrap this one up. So yeah, but let us know what your favorite dinner scenes are. We probably missed quite a bit. But that's just because there are so many of them. So track us down. Let us know. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So give them a listen. And our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So check him out. You can find us and let us know what your favorite dinner scenes are. At the Eye On Horror Facebook the Eye On Horror Twitter the Eye On Horror Instagram. The Eye On Horror. letterbox the Eye On Horror Tinder. The Eye On Horror Grindr. What else do we have? Ooh, Bumble.

Jonathan Correia:

I think we're on that one. Do we know is that a thing? Seen

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, are we on? We're on better right? Because

Jonathan Correia:

we're gonna be Yeah, we're already pretty bad. Also, tell us tell us your favorite breakfast and lunch scenes. What's your favorite salad date scenes? what's your what's your favorite? Getting a coffee? See how much of these favorite scenes is actually from Scream Queens which gives us the best of all of the dinner scenes including Thanksgiving with the TRad rad With the red whales have had to sneak in Scream Queens real quick.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Okay. Cool. All right. So, yeah, let us know what your favorite dinner scenes are and we will see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison,

Jonathan Correia:

and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Hypnotic Review
The Beta Test Reviews
Jacob Attends Severin's Super Pop Up
Jacob Gushes Over Night of the Demon
Correia Starts Rambling About Blackhat and Van Helsing for Some Damn Reason
Now Correia's ADHD Takes the Van Helsing Conversation Into Ranting About Darren Aronofsky's Noah. Remember That Movie? Russel Crowe Trying to Murder a Baby? There Was A Boat!
Great White Reviews
Jacob Loves Godzilla
Jacob Reviews Ghost Master
James Reviews Censor
Dysfunctional Demented Dinners Dives and Drive-Ins
The Construct of Time, Breakfast, and The Chest Burster Scene in Alien
Dinner with Draculas
Seriously, What holiday Are They Celebrating in You're Next?
Hereditary Making It Too Real
Hereditary Making It Too Real
The Meal Portions in Midsommar Were Too Small and Had No Sides
Rocky Horror Dinner Show
Outros