Eye On Horror

What a Twist! The films of M. Night Shyamalan

August 15, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 14
Eye On Horror
What a Twist! The films of M. Night Shyamalan
Show Notes Transcript

This episode, the guys talk about The Suicide Squad, The Green Knight, and Woodstock 99 before getting into a discussion about Old and the rest of Shyamalan's twisty terrors.

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James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror The official podcast of ihorror.com This is Episode 71 otherwise known as season four Episode 14. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Much better.

James Jay Edwards:

Much better. Were you not doing well?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I was moving and as you can imagine, the experience was extremely unpleasant and was awful.

James Jay Edwards:

And right after you move you skip town.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's the thing too. I'm better because I finished moving and then immediately went on vacation on the east coast. I'm currently recording this from a friend's place and just doing this off of an air mattress, so a bit of a change of pace, but you know, I'll make it work. Alright, so

James Jay Edwards:

if you hear him bouncing, it's because he is also with us. Today is your other other hosts Jon Correia. How you doing Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

doing great. I'm back in LA after being on the road for a month which is tiring, very tough. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

we need to apologize because we missed a week and basically because the world is kind of opening back up which means our lives are opening back up it's the

Jonathan Correia:

summer man summer you know shows pick back up and then yeah, cinemas are back open. So Jacob's busy and just, you know, we tried we really we had a pretty cool guest signed up and it just scheduling I'll take most of the blame on that because I was Road Warrioring it up and being an a-hole just drive it driving all over, you know, to sweet spots like Spotsylvania, Virginia.

James Jay Edwards:

So, what has been going on? What do you guys been seeing anything good? Um, well, I

Jacob Davidson:

just came back from seeing James Gunn's The Suicide Squad. And let me tell you, it was exactly my kind of jam. It's the kind of James Gunn movie you love because it is a James Gunn movie. And, you know, like one of my favorite reviews described it best as a $180 million Troma movie. Just if you're the kind of person who enjoys James Gunn movies, this is the James Gunn movie to enjoy. Cuz Yeah, it's just great to see him get back to his roots, like, you know, able to do something that is extremely gory and splat sticky and gross and weird and where anybody can die. So the stakes are really high and is just if you like his stuff, you'll like this.

Jonathan Correia:

Well and and that's the thing is that a lot of the reviews, especially the poll quotes from reviews, I feel are focusing a lot on the violence, the splat the inappropriate humor, all that and it's definitely all there. There's no denying it, that suicide squad has a lot of that and it's fantastic, but it's also just like a genuinely pretty well. nice tight, you know, action ride like it's it wears his influences on its sleeves. I almost immediately wanted to watch the original Inglorious Basterds and Wild Geese after viewing it yesterday. The action is fantastic. I love that. Even though the ultimate threat in the movie is kind of an intergalactic -- cuz that's where all superhero movies go, right? It's always it's never Oh, shit, I gotta stop this guy cuz he's a bad guy. It's always I gotta save the galaxy. I gotta save the world. And even though this film does get to that point, it still feels like a small contained personal story. I always connect more with the superhero stories where it's like, this guy is trying to take over this block. This guy's trying to take over the city, or just like, hey, this guy's being a righteous dick. And I feel like even though that they do go for that bigger type of villain, I mean Starro was huge. That's that's the original villain that that brought the Justice League together in the comics, but he's also a product of his time. He's a very much so a golden age comics villain, and he does look ridiculous. So I'm glad that they like found a really good balance with that. And I think that's the thing that I admire most about -- about this Suicide Squad is there is really good balance. Yes, there's a lot of dick jokes, but there's also a lot of heart they do a really good job of have not taking back steps with Harley Quinn's character and having her you see the growth whether it's her her having tattoos modified or removed, or just like how she interacts with people. One of the big plot points is directly tied to the growth that she had in Birds of Prey. And I thought that was really good seeing these, that there is a huge there's so many characters in this movie. It's a big ensemble, but they're all really flushed out, they all have their faults. They all have, you know, their weaknesses. And I thought that was really good that they took the time to do that, because that's really important. Because you got to know and you got to love these characters. But like you said, anyone can die. It's a suicide mission that they're on. That's why they called the Suicide Squad. And they do and so there's like, actual, like weight behind. It's not just, I don't know, the first film, it felt like it was trying too hard to come up with stuff to sell on Hot Topic t shirts. And this one, you could definitely tell that they were trying to make a movie.

James Jay Edwards:

If I had known that we were gonna be talking about the Suicide Squad so much I would have seen it.

Jonathan Correia:

Why didn't you?

James Jay Edwards:

Well, I'm going to go into that right now. It's playing on HBO max. So I couldn't -- I just haven't gotten a chance since it's been playing on HBO Max, because of I don't know, same reasons we missed our last recording, where I've just, I've gotten five hours sleep in last 48 hours. But the press screening, which was on Tuesday before it opens, I actually RSVP for it. I was gonna go. But then I found out it was press / promo and they were packing the feeder to 90%. And San Diego is a Delta variant hotspot and the I'm fully Vaxxed, but the Delta doesn't care. So you know, Vax just means you're not going to go to the hospital, but I'm not bringing that home, you know, to my wife, or you know, I'm not spreading that around. So I backed out of that. But the Monday before it, I saw Free Guy, which was press only. So they're like 15 people. It's not really horror, most of the stuff I've seen isn't really horror, so I'm going to not spend a whole lot of time on it. But Free Guy is the one with Ryan Reynolds as a as a non player character in a video game that suddenly becomes sentient of himself. NPC they

Jonathan Correia:

call them yeah, yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Non player character,

Jonathan Correia:

not playable character.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, that's what NPC stands for. He's a bank teller, whose bank always gets robbed, because that's one of the missions in the game is bank heist. So every day he goes to work at his bank. But one day, he figures out some stuff and he becomes blue shirt guy, which is it becomes this viral sensation in this game, because it's one of those massive multiplayer universe games online. At every site, who's playing blue shirt guy, he's not a player. It's it's kind of fun. But anyway, I don't want to go too far into it. Because, first of all, it's better to just experience it. But also it's not more. But probably the most horror thing I've seen. And I'm hoping you guys have both seen this. The Green Knight you guys see it?

Jacob Davidson:

I actually got a story about that. Because I'm back in my hometown, and I was looking for something to do and my local theater the Coolidge Corner Theatre in Brookline, Massachusetts, was actually doing the screening of the green night. And after that they were doing 35 millimeter revival screening of Monty Python and the Holy Grail, so I watched both back to back

James Jay Edwards:

it's actually a pretty appropriate double feature.

Jacob Davidson:

It really is.

James Jay Edwards:

It's it's that Arthurian lore,

Jonathan Correia:

I'm so jealous of

James Jay Edwards:

you Have you not seen The Green Knight Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, no.

James Jay Edwards:

So good. And see it see it in a theater try to find yourself a screening because it is a big screen. We it is a beautifully made movie,

Jonathan Correia:

dude. I I just got home yesterday. And the first thing I did was drinking an energy drink and watch Suicide Squad and then pass out

James Jay Edwards:

The Green Knight. It's a it's a beautifully made movie. It looks gorgeous. The score is incredible. Dev Patel is awesome in it and the rest of the cast Alicia Vikander, she pulls double duty she plays two different roles. I don't want to spoil what they are. But um, and then Sean Harris is is the king they never call him King Arthur. But if you know the lore, he's fucking King Arthur. And then it's Ralph Ineson from The VVitc is the quote Green Knight. Th you know, I mean, he's fully C because the Green Knight in thi is almost like a tree. He's no really even a man. But anyway it's a it's terrific. It is s good. There's one scene in it And this is probably the closes to horror it gets. That involve like a ghost. And it's kind of side quest scene. But it's can't stop thinking about it' chilling. Anyway, see The Gree Knight, it's beautifu

Jacob Davidson:

Second, I love The Green Knight. It was very haunting. So I mean, it's not outright horror, but a lot of it is very eerie, especially if you think about it in certain ways. But yeah, Dev Patel was great. I just am a sucker for that type of fantasy. So, you know, check out the Green Knight if you can. And again, it does make a surprisingly good double feature with Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Which is the other thing like the you know, I can understand the Green Knight taking creative liberties with our three royal lore but we all know gwaine was killed with Hector and boars by the killer rabbit.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, you're spoiling it because if you know the Green Knight legend, you know how the Green Knight turns out, which is weird because it almost looks like it's gonna throw you a curve. In the Green Knight and I almost lost me at the end and then it brought it back and I'm like, Okay, I'm on board again. But yeah, it's uh, yeah, the green knights and I wish that you could have seen Excalibur before at two for the triple feature because I feel like Excalibur would have just put you over the top. The green Knights actually it's a good companion filmed Excalibur actually.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, definitely. It had that Borman vibe.

James Jay Edwards:

Yes, absolutely. It's David Lowery who did a ghost story, and the remake of Pete's Dragon. So it's a pretty dark movie. In fact, one of my critic friends actually said, if you're going to see the Green Knight, this is an interview. If you're going to see the green night bring a seeing eye dog because you're not going to see anything on screen. I'm like, that's not quite true. But it's a pretty dark movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Very true. Yeah. Both in content and image

Jonathan Correia:

as anyone seen someone do a trailer mash up yet of the for the Green Knight where it's the Green Knight trailer, but with the Green Power Ranger.

Jacob Davidson:

That would be very fun.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm just saying, like this whole time. Like as soon as James said, like, Oh, yeah, if you know the Green Knight lore, if you know the Green Knight story I could think of is, Well yeah, he was the White Ranger. And he was evil. You took them all out with his knife flute thing. We know he was a Green Ranger and then became the White Ranger. And I'm like, wait, no, that's Power Rangers.

James Jay Edwards:

Now. Another thing that's not really horror, but it goes to some dark places. Have you guys seen Jungle Cruise? No, I

Jacob Davidson:

haven't.

James Jay Edwards:

Since you know, we're all big. Dwayne The Rock Johnson fans. Jungle Cruise is actually pretty fun. It it's, it's basically Emily Blunt and her brother's characters. They want to go into the Amazon to find this plant. And of course, Jesse Plemons is navigating the Amazon River in a submarine, which is actually pretty freakin awesome.

Jacob Davidson:

Also, it seemed like a German officers. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah. Yeah, he's he Well, he speaks with a German accent and he's in a German u boat. So I guess he is.

Jonathan Correia:

So is he a Nazi? Man? No, I you know, I?

Jacob Davidson:

There's like World War One.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, he doesn't wear Nazi insignias or anything. I'm not sure it's definitely takes place in the past. I don't know if it's the 30s or the 20s or whatever. But, um, but it kind of gets dark because the whole thing starts revolving around like people have been joking about, about ghost pirates. But they're actually ghost Conquistadores? Because, you know, the Amazon was, you know, basically overrun by the monkey stores. Anyway, it's uh, yeah, go won't go into it too much cuz it's not really horror, but it's it's a fun one. And it's got The Rock. The Rock, Oh my God. He tells the worst bad dad jokes. The worst dad jokes ever. And at one point, Emily Blunt kind of calls him on it. He goes because they're going into headhunter territory. And he goes, we're headed down river in a headhunter territory, which is a bad place to be headed. And heavily blunt ghosts. Not now. And he goes can't turn it off.

Jonathan Correia:

Dad jokes and Emily Blunt as a fun adventurer.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm sold. Yeah, you're in speaking of The Rock.

Jonathan Correia:

I know these two know this. And you guys can't see it. So I'll make sure to post a picture after this episode airs. But we have two fantastic additions to the Eye On Horror office. That's right. My boy Skie hooked us up with two action figures of Lizzie and Ralph from the movie Rampage to be displayed in the Eye On Horror main offices. I.e it's in my living room right now.

James Jay Edwards:

Hey, we work from home that is the main office Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I did have to find one of George on eBay so that will be coming in by the time this episode airs. So when I when I post a picture will be of all three but yeah, long live Rampage forever.

James Jay Edwards:

Also well, while we're digging into stuff that's not really horror, but we also this goes along with I know last year we were talking about the fire festival. Have you guys watched that Woodstock documentary and he

Jacob Davidson:

did Woodstock 99

James Jay Edwards:

peace love and rage. Holy shit.

Jonathan Correia:

I already hate white men already. So I don't know.

James Jay Edwards:

Basically that's its whole thesis is that Woodstock 99 was a a straight white cis male at frat boy Haven and they they make the observation there like there are three female acts on this. There's Liz Fair or not Liz Fair, Sheryl Crow, Jewel, and I even forget who the other one is. But they had one on each day of the festival. So it's like they just went okay, and here's the act for the ladies. And it's kind of ridiculous because then the bands that they had on there like you can kind of see where it took a turn for the worst is Limp Bizkit on Saturday night, that's where it turned and really just started getting toxic. And Fred Durst of course is egging it on even though promoters were begging him like I'll do calm the crowd down Calm countdown he's gonna break shit, you know but and then Rage Against the Machine played after him which they you know it I don't think anything really happened during their set but then Metallica went on and shit went crazy again. And then the next day people were they were tired that the plumbing was broken so the restrooms didn't work. They were charging four bucks a bottle for water. So and this

Jonathan Correia:

was in 99 when water wasn't $4 a bottle at festivals, just just context.

James Jay Edwards:

By the time the Chili Peppers went on, who I don't I think they might have been the headliner, but the place was completely on fire. And they talked about how they went to Anthony Kiedis they said hey, you calm the crowd down. You know, their lightin' shit on fire. Well, the Chili Peppers come out and do their encore with Jimi Hendrix's Fire? Yeah. Like, dude's No, that is not what we need from you. But it's Yeah, it's crazy. I mean, just the look at that whole frat boy, white rap, new metal scene, you know, cuz like Kid Rock was another one of the ones that people and it's weird, because, I mean, I'm no fan of Kid Rock. But you can see that he's a talented motherfucker. But just by the shots of him playing in this, he can take any instrument that he would, he would walk up behind his keyboard player and sit down or walk up with his DJ and start scratching. You know, he any one of the instruments in his band, he would walk up and take it for the person to start with and you're like, dude, but the thing that is so weird about it, one of the promoters at one point said it because basically all the women were walking around with their tops off. And one of the promoters said, you know, because there were a lot of sexual assaults at this thing. And one of the voters goes well, you have to wonder, you know how much sexual assault there be if these women didn't weren't walking around naked the whole weekend? And you're like, it's like, the biggest shouldn't have worn that dress moment. It's like just such a facepalm you're like, I'll do

Jacob Davidson:

How about that's fucked up.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, how about you teach these toxic frat boys to you know, not assault women just because they see their boobs. But anyway, it's an amazing, you know, it kind of goes hand in hand with that fire festival, Doc. Although this one is more infuriating, because a little bit of it is the promoters fault. But a lot of it is just I mean, it's the promoters fault because the band's they booked? I mean, when you put that much testosterone on one stage, what did you expect to happen?

Jonathan Correia:

But it's also a logistics. You know, huge, like you said the plumbing was bad. They didn't have enough resources. So they started jacking up the prices because it got limited. They didn't have enough security. They didn't do enough. They didn't do enough to keep people safe, as is one of the big issues and I do. I used to have a Woodstock 99 shirt. I got it found at a thrift store. And I remember wearing it in high school a lot. I wish I still had it just because it was cool tie dye shirt. And it's funny because it said festival of loving it. And I knew the history behind it. But no, I think Kathleen Hanna said it best I think it was that one of the MTV Movie Awards or Music Awards. And it was her and her husband came out and she gave like a full statement about how that was absolute bullshit. What happened at Woodstock 99. They have the footage in the documentary about her, the punk singer. And it's chilling do just hearing her account of it. And just like totally damning everyone that was involved with the organization of it. And that's why I wasn't so eager to jump into it because I already knew this story. And it's just like, I don't want to like

James Jay Edwards:

I remember when it was on. MTV had like live coverage of it. And I remember Kurt Loder and Serena Altschul. They were like scared on live TV. They're saying, we're getting the fuck out of here. They didn't say fuck because they were still on. You know, they knew they were on TV, but they said, we're getting out of here. This is dangerous. And this is during you know, right after the chili pepper set. And people were looting food trucks and stuff. You know, setting stuff on fire burning this place down the other female artists was a lot of smart set it you know, I want to give her a little bit of credit. So the three female artists that were that represented Alanis Morissette, Sheryl Crow and Jewel, and they held it on some old decommissioned military base. So it was all concrete with this big fence around it. So that was the big thing. They wanted to avoid the mistakes of the other two Woodstock's and keep gatecrashers out, which also kept the paying guests in, I guess. So anyway. It's horrifying.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Well, I do have some horror to talk about because it's been a minute, but the last time we met, we talked about Fear Street, but we mainly only talked about the first two. Well, guess what? It's been almost a month and I finally did watch the third one, 1666. Man, that was what what a great third act and what a great like encompassing of it. Especially when that mid movie title. Try not to spoil anything but the mid movie title card, you know, you know what I'm talking about? Oh, yeah, (part two) wraps it up. Yeah. Oh man. That was great. There was Some like really great moments, I liked how they did a really good job of selling that it wasn't just the the main character seeing the past, it was her living through her eyes, which is why they were placed like they had, like, actors from all of all over the timeline playing roles in 1666. And, man, I just thought it came together so well. And then like, the twist at the end was just so well executed. I fully agree i would i agree with everyone that I would love to see this director continue to build the Fear Street world and to create, as they call it, the MCU of horror on Netflix, but I'm just more excited to see what more they can do more original out of them. You know what I mean? Like I would I would have loved to seen, you know, Expanded Universe on the witch and stuff. But I'm glad that that director went on to go create other original stuff. So I really want to see what what she does because, yeah, Fear Street as a full story trilogy, which is absolutely fantastic. I can't recommend it enough.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, definitely want to see more in the future. And as for me, just before I left, for the East Coast, I actually did something really fun. I went to a Scream-a-thon at the New Beverly. So I got to watch Scream one through four back to back to back in 35 millimeter. And it was a blast.

Jonathan Correia:

He said Scream-a-ton, and I was like, Oh, so what titles are one through four. It's like, Oh, I I'm just so used to it's like it's a ghoulish marathon. I don't expect them to, like Ghoulies one through four at a Google the ghoulish marathon, but I guess yeah, a Scream-a-thon, you know, that makes sense. I was it revisiting those in theaters with an audience.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, man, it was a lot of fun. Yeah, it was. It was the thing is I seen only Scream one, two and four. So that was my first time seeing screen three, which, you know, kind of the derided entry in the series. But you know, honestly, it was this pretty good. Wasn't it was as bad as people made it out to be.

James Jay Edwards:

I like screen three, Scream 3 is very meta, because basically now it's been a long time since I've seen it. But screen three, aren't they on the set of stab two?

Jacob Davidson:

Step seven

James Jay Edwards:

steps? That's right. They went farther than that. But yeah, they're making one of the sequels to the movie about that. About the first one stab.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Oh, scabs seven. And they got Parker Posey as Courtney Cox's character and so they do kind of like a weird Scooby Doo team up and it was funny as hell

James Jay Edwards:

isn't Carrie Fisher in that one too.

Jonathan Correia:

She has a cameo. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah. No, there's a lot of great cameos in that one too, because you got Roger Corman and Lance Henriksen So Jay and Silent Bob which I like to think means that this movie is set at the exact same time of Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back like both just both those movies are happening concurrently.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, cuz because Miramax and then we're really pushing to have Jay and Silent Bob be the new Abbott and Costello and we're trying to develop Jay and Silent Bob meet Hellraiser.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, but anyway, um, is seeing all four Screams back to back was a lot of fun and just it put them in an interesting context because they are really sequential. And dammit, they all hold up you know, all of them are good movies. You know, simple fact. You know, Scream one and two are classics. Scream three was better than expected. Scream four, I have a much bigger appreciation for now. So it was pretty cool to watch some like that and especially in a theater. So I'm actually pretty stoked to see what happens with Scream five because it's happening although it's just gonna be known as scream because you know, it's a lot of these later movie sequels do Halloween. Yeah, yeah. Kevin Williamson, though, is back to write it. So I'm pretty excited to see how that comes about.

Jonathan Correia:

And it's from the duo that gave us the brilliant Ready or Not, so I mean, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah. Radio Silence. Can't go wrong there.

James Jay Edwards:

Another thing that we haven't talked about because we haven't met and so long, but it's kind of old news right now. Get it? Dad jokes. Shyamalan's Old. You guys both seen it, right?

Jonathan Correia:

Sorry, I'm still reeling in from that terrible joke segue. I know we're the kings of segways. But oh,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, Old.... Full disclosure, I'm a Shyamalan fanboy. I even like The Happening.

Jonathan Correia:

I love The Happening

Jacob Davidson:

Me too

James Jay Edwards:

take that with a grain of salt but I thought it was really good. I really enjoyed it. There are parts of it that are kind of silly. I kind of and this this, this was a this is a problem with The Happening as well. I kind of wish take that would have someone help them write his dialogue, because I think he has great story ideas, but some of his dialogue is a little some of it. Well, in this one, a lot of it but like if you're looking at movies like the Sixth Sense or Split, which, you know, spoiler alert, we're going to be later but anyway, not all of his movies are Like that. And with The Happening, I think we kind of, you know, spoiler alert, we're going to be talking about this later. But The Happening, I feel like they're trying to take it to like a 50s Sci-Fi level. So it's kind of forgiven. I'm not the only thing I can think of with old is these kids as they're growing up on this beach. You know, if anyone doesn't know the concept, these people go to this beach and they start aging. It's like, two years, every hour, I think is what it is. So you'll basically live your entire life in like a day and a half. But the kids, the kids in it, when as they grow old, they are children in these adult bodies, I kind of get them saying stupid stuff. But like the one that would kill me and this got this got funny after a while is one of the characters is a therapist, and every time something dramatic happens, she goes, we should talk about what just happened.

Jonathan Correia:

Every Okay, first of all, I love The Happening because it plays out exactly. dialogue and everything like a 50s-- like a cheesy B movie 50s sci fi film like it would be right, it is prime for MST3K. And it was brilliant because it had all these big stars and a big budget. And when you approach it with that, with that mindset, it's a fun movie. And I was so excited for the first like 15 minutes of Old I was like, do we have a successor to The Happening? And then it just kept getting? It just did not have that balance it had I counted five fucking endings. Like that movie could have ended at least five times and it kept going. It was like, here's the twist. But no, we're gonna keep going with it. Oh, we're not dead yet. We're gonna keep going up. But it's so annoying. Have some mystery to it, man. You don't need to keep putting like, especially with Old like, they could have stopped it like so much earlier, it would have been like, Whoa, that was cool. I wonder what else it's like, no, we're gonna keep showing you. But it was nothing cool. It was nothing well, and that dialogue, fuck you on saying that it was sometimes bad. It was. So there is literally a part in the beginning. Okay, so the so the parents of the kids are fighting. They're going through marital stuff. And they're not even really fighting. They're just kind of having a discussion. And all of a sudden the wife just goes, your head is stuck in the future. And he goes, Yeah, well, you're stuck in the past, you work in a museum, I turned to my buddy and just went, ah, if only they learned to live in the present, maybe they could save their marriage.

James Jay Edwards:

foreshadowing that that car ride where there were I think the girl is singing. And she's like, I can't wait to hear your voice in the future. It's like all this heavy handed foreshadowing that but

Jonathan Correia:

you know, it's so heavy handed and like, it's just like, wait until you get older. That was another thing. They

James Jay Edwards:

said they want to do something. They're like, I'll wait till you get older. It's like also in about four hours.

Jonathan Correia:

No. And the thing is, is that like, there are times in M. Knight's films where like, he is not that great with dialogue and really should work with a co writer. But usually, it's made up with like some very interesting camerawork. He's very good with, with with, with an eye for cinema. But there was and there were some like really great and very interesting angles that he used in this film. And then other times, there was just some, like, really weird choices that did not work. Like there was a lot of times when the kids first start aging, where they're not showing them but you can hear like the voices change. And you can see like, it's clearly like the arm of an older child or something like that. And they're, but they're not showing the faces yet to be revealed. Like, there's some really cool and interesting stuff they were doing with there. And then there were times where like, like you were saying, like, Oh, I can't wait to hear your voice older. And then later on when the kids like older and they sing, and it stays on the mom's face. And like I get that maybe you were trying to go for like, you know, showing the emotional range of the mom acting and reacting, but they weren't doing anything. And it just got really like uninteresting very quickly. I will say this that the two actors who were the kids at like teenager, early 20s age so the the guy from Hereditary and the girl from Jojo Rabbit, they were phenomenal. They they I think they really nailed the young kid and an older person's body. And that balance of their minds kind of developing but not really developing because they did explore that a little bit in the movie to where it's like, oh, all these new feelings and stuff because they're hitting puberty so quick, but their minds not really catching up. But there's still that

James Jay Edwards:

there's one point it was I literally started laughing because there's something that happens. I don't want to spoil it. It obviously only Shyamalan's movie. We're not going to spoil today. Because it's so yeah, but there's one thing that happens while they're growing old that I couldn't believe they went there, but they had to go there because it would totally happen. And I know that you know what I'm talking about.

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know because I'm just thinking of all the things that made me angry in that movie. They see this. The thing is that the movie had some like cool ideas, but then there was a lot of like really dumb ones that came, there was a lot of dumb deaths. There's a lot of dumb dialogue. There was a lot of weird camera angles that didn't work. What was the name of the hip hop artists in the movie?

James Jay Edwards:

Like, Full Size Sedan?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, Full Size Sedan, which great hip hop artists name, love it. terrible name for a character in your fucking movie. I'm gonna say it like that. I ultimately, I ultimately left the theater a bit disappointed like it was it was I'm glad I saw it with my buddy. And I'm glad we saw it in a theater where there wasn't a lot of people so I could lean over and crack jokes every now and then. But I can't dude, it just it. It didn't have that a good balance. And again, I don't mind stuff having multiple long gated endings. I applaud the good place for continuing on for another episode in like giving an epitaph to all its characters, but Jesus fucking Christ, I had like five endings to it. And I was just so exhausted and so tired and so full of over salted popcorn. That was my bad, not the theaters bad. But yeah, I just, it didn't vibe with me.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's move on to what we're going to talk about. today. We're going to talk about Shyamalan twists. And not every one of his movies has a twist, so we're not going to talk about all of them. I'm sure

Jonathan Correia:

spoiler alert. Not all of his movies have twists. Yeah. Also, spoiler alert. Spoiler

James Jay Edwards:

alert, we're gonna spoil every Shyamalan movie except Old. We're going to be respectful in case you haven't seen Old yet. But the rest of them, we're going to spoil the hell out of them. So if you haven't seen Shyamalan movies, let's go chronologically through them

Jacob Davidson:

from the beginning

James Jay Edwards:

threat. Well, not the beginning because his first two movies Praying with Anger and Wide Awake, no doubt. Sure. But the one that put them on the map, the Sixth Sense, the classic, classic twist. This coined the phrase Shyamalan twist.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, now that that one was really big for this time, especially because, um, you know, it's like, especially for a horror movie. You know, it just it was amazing that it became such a huge impact on popular culture

James Jay Edwards:

of horror in quotes, kind of like silences the language. It's like a church. You know, it's Oscar horror, actually, you

Jacob Davidson:

could call it one way of putting it.

Jonathan Correia:

I believe they call that thriller. Oscar horror, it's a thriller.

James Jay Edwards:

But there are a whole lot of ghosts because, you know, anyone who's been living under a rock for the last 30 years or 22 years or whatever, Sixth Sense is about the boy who sees dead people. And here's where we spoil it. The twist is Bruce Willis, the psychiatrist who's helping him is dead the whole time.

Jonathan Correia:

And what a What a waste of an afterlife. This dude's dead. He could be in heaven. He could be in hell. He could be scaring people. He could be pranking people. He could be doing so many spooky cool ghost shit but what does he do? He goes to fucking work.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, he doesn't even realize he's dead.

James Jay Edwards:

That's well that's that's the thing he he needed help moving on. And that's where that's where the little boy came in. So I think the Sixth Sense is the classic it is probably the it is the standard of Shyamalan twists that we are going to measure Shyamalan twists by

Jonathan Correia:

it's also one of the few times that M. Night actually did a good job with a child actor because especially if Old prooved... if Old proved anything that I love Shyamalan, I he's such a nice guy. I met him once. And he was nothing but like the nicest guy ever. But like, man, dude, his work with child actors. It's just like, not there. Especially an old dude, those early scenes were very rough.

James Jay Edwards:

Part of that is probably he had Haley Joel Osment. Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

that kid was a prodigy. Like, yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I think part of it is the actor himself. I mean, granted with child actors, you put more of the emphasis on the director because he's kind of directing them. But I think that if you have a talented Canvas, it makes it easier. So I think a lot of that is that, um, let's move on to Unbreakable. Oh, yeah, dude, more Bruce Willis. And this time Bruce Willis survives a train wreck that kills everybody else on it. And he doesn't have a scratch on him. And he figures out he's a superhero. That's not the twist. What's the twist? The twist is Samuel Jackson, who is the world's most breakable man. Mr. Glass is um, he basically thinks of himself as a supervillain. And he has been staging all these accidents around the world to find his arch nemesis. And that's what he does when he he staged this train crash. And when Bruce Willis survived without a scratch on him, he said there that's my nemesis so that that's the twist.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I just love that flash or like when he when he finds out the truth and Samuel Jackson just says they called me Mr. Glass. It's such a stunning, you know, kind of in line.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean that that was that was ahead of its time. I know I think Unbreakable didn't do super tremendous at the box office. But like it was ahead of its time and doing comic books and being gritty and critiquing it. And just a great performance from Bruce Willie. You know, that was before Samuel Jackson. Yeah, it's especially Samuel Jackson and that one. Yeah. I mean, who doesn't remember the scene when he falls into the pool? I mean, that was just

James Jay Edwards:

and now Unbreakable is you're still pretty good on the twist scale with Shyamalan. This one is still pretty good. I mean, you can see it coming a little further away. But it's still pretty solid.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, the movies not dependent on it yet. You know what I mean? Like it's there, you kind of know it's coming, but it's not going to make it did the twist and make or break Unbreakable? Like, even without the twists? Like it's a solid film? Same with Sixth Sense? Kind of, you know, that's what really made it good. But it's not like you need it.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Couple years later, Signs. Hmm.

Jonathan Correia:

I haven't really seen Signs since it came out. But

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, I haven't seen it in a long time either. But Signs is basically an alien invasion movie, Mel Gibson with his crisis of faith. And the twist in this one is the aliens can be defeated by water, which you're like, Okay, why the hell they pick a planet at 70% water to invade? It's like, come on, do your homework, aliens. This is pretty typical of like War of the Worlds we're talking about how the happening is like 50 sci fi tribute. This kind of is like that too. Because at the end of War of the Worlds, you know, the aliens are defeated by bacteria or, you know, germs.

Jonathan Correia:

But But the thing is, is that like and you and you could definitely see that like Shyamalan was going for like a more intimate story. Instead of like a global everyone's dealing with these aliens everywhere, like in War of the Worlds and then the big twist is, is they weren't used to the vector. That makes sense. Because you know, you can have you can make the argument that aliens didn't have sensors, they didn't think about that. And that is something that happens a lot. Even just going from one continent to another, you know, not you know, that's how that's why people have terrible bowel movements when they go travel, you know, stuff like that. But like, yeah, you can see water from space, especially Earth water. We have a lot we're mostly water.

James Jay Edwards:

But maybe these aliens I just thought of this maybe these aliens didn't know that they would that their weaknesses, water maybe if their planet has no water. Maybe they've it's a completely foreign concept to them. I don't know. Anyway, Signs? You're slipping a little bit night. You're this one. But two years after that. The Village?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Now as far as Shyamalan twists, go, The Village is pretty fucking rad, the whole movie, you think it's a period piece. But then, at the very end, you discover that this, these people are living in this like National Park in the past, and it actually takes place in modern time. That's your twist and Shyamalan is back. This is another one of those jaw droppers. You know, all of the goodwill he lost in Signs is back with The Village.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, funny enough. I'll you know, at the time, there was a lot of criticism about the twist. But I think it's one of those rare cases where the twist actually aged better than when it initially came out. Because, yeah, I mean, a lot of people complained a ton. But you know, in retrospect, it actually was a pretty good twist to sticking with the themes of, you know, like, control because, you know, it's this Puritan style Society of people who think modern times is sinful. So they made it, you know, like, historic, you know, like, a historical time and lied about it to the children, the people raised in town. So, yeah, it's it's definitely better than it was initially given credit for when it came out.

Jonathan Correia:

And that was, I think, one of the, one of the first times Shyamalan went too far into explaining the twist or going into it for The Village kind of works, because that brings up a lot of questions like, Wait, how, why haven't they seen planes? Why has no one discovered them yet? And like so they do spend the time to be like, Oh, it's because they worked out a deal with the local government to not have planes fly over that area, or they worked out a deal. They bought the land and fenced it off and have a security person there who's played by Shyamalan and all this, you know, kooky stuff like that. And like that I get, you know, because it's like, okay, yeah, I guess you can take the time to explain it. But I don't know for me, I feel like what would twist you kind of got to get in and get out a little bit. But I mean, it worked. It worked for The Village. I thought that was a very above average film

James Jay Edwards:

that brings us to The Happening.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. Oh, can I explain this one? Yes, go for that go

James Jay Edwards:

for it. So

Jonathan Correia:

The Happening is Shyamalan's masterpiece his magnum opus, if you if you if I do say so myself, know, people are mysteriously murdering themselves all across the world. And no one knows why. But then they start to realize oh, it's the plants doing it Why? climate change and Mother Nature's fighting back, buddy. Oh my god it's fucking great the from the iconic scenes of them going the wind is blowing this way. The other direction no no it's better the other way and I do I could watch that bit on repeat for hours and and be entertained. Plus it had some gnarly kills like the dude throwing himself into the lion path there's one guy who threw his head went, you know dove headfirst into a lawn mower like ah oh no could forget Marky Mark going come on. Be scientific. douchebag

James Jay Edwards:

right. That's a it's Marky Mark which is weird because

Jonathan Correia:

that's the hardest sell of the movie.

James Jay Edwards:

You guys know that I'm the biggest Boogie Nights fan you're ever going to I think he is perfectly cast and that's what I think that's why I think he's so good as well. Dirk Diggler is second best ready from Torrance but his second best role is his first to Happening.

Jonathan Correia:

What No, no, no the reason why he worked so well in The Happening is because he's so miscast. Like who would believe that a guy with with that that Mark Wahlberg, super thick Boston accent and everything would make very good science teacher like Get the fuck at it.

James Jay Edwards:

What do you think his best role is?

Jonathan Correia:

His best role is Fear.

James Jay Edwards:

Come on. He's not acting in Fear.

Jonathan Correia:

I know. That's why it's his best role. That's why it's his best. You're not going to come on Andrew Dice Clay is best when he's playing Andrew Dice Clay. You know, Burt Reynolds is best when he's Burt Reynolds, you know, like an Raven. All right. And Marky Mark is great at that come on that scene when William Peterson walks away and he starts pounding his chest. And you're like, what is this guy doing? And then like he shows up? It's fucking great. Fear's fantastic. I'm not saying that. It's Marky Mark's best movie. I'm just saying like, fit in the role. That was his best.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's skip over to The Visit. I did not see this twist coming at all. Basically The Visit is a found footage movie this the little girls and a budding filmmaker. And her and her brother are going to go visit the grandparents. So they go they visit the grandparents and something's weird about the grandparents. I can't put the finger on it. But they're weird. And they've never met these grandparents, which is kind of foreshadowing for the twist because the twist at one point. There's they're Skyping with mom, and then mom sees the grandparents who goes kids don't panic. Those are not your grandparents.

Jacob Davidson:

And they were

James Jay Edwards:

in that they were spending their summer or mom went on a cruise so they were spending their mom's cruise with people who were not their grandparents. They really jumped through hoops to establish why the mom, why like the kids wouldn't know what the grandparents look like

Jonathan Correia:

or why that why there was no like no one going hey those aren't them but basically like the whole time the grandparents have been acting weird and it turns out that these this old couple are just like crazy as fuck and our escape their state mental patients. Yeah, yeah. And they murdered the the actual grandparents and we're posing as them. Just because, you know, crazy be crazy like that. It's not It's not the like, you know, best at that, you know, displaying mental health, you know, but

James Jay Edwards:

I thought you're gonna say it's not his best twist no, it's fucking up there though. But no, you're right. It is not the best at portraying mental health

Jonathan Correia:

but also after like three films or four films with like this, Split, Glass, and then now Old like yeah, I think he's we've established that he's not great. He there is some really good stuff like talking about sundown syndrome and stuff, which I thought was really great. And like how they get like, they kind of go they get put into overdrive with their weirdness after the sun goes down. Because that is that is fact or not fact. But that is something that happens a lot with, with some cases, you know, like dementia and whatnot. But my biggest issues with The Visit is purely just of the same issues that always come up with found footage stuff, which is like, why was the camera still rolling there?

James Jay Edwards:

Because she's a budding filmmaker. That's why I thought that was one of the most organic parts of the movie. This this little girl is like a budding Spielberg. So she films her entire life. I thought that was one of the more grant organic parts of the movie. It's one of the more organic found footage movies, I think,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, like as a generic explanation as to why Okay, I'll give you that but like, angles wide still going, you know, there's just like, a lot of just inherent issues I have with found footage and she's,

James Jay Edwards:

she's gonna have the creative angles, but

Jonathan Correia:

no, I mean, just like it's stuff like I'm running but I'm still gonna make sure I'm pointing the camera at the thing that's chasing me even though you know, I mean, like it works for films like Willow Creek or we're and you know, we're not getting into issues about them always

James Jay Edwards:

get the shot. You worked on enough movies where you know you always get the shot.

Jonathan Correia:

This is why I found footage annoys me. So much No, no, I thought it was really solid plus it's got my girl Kathryn Hahn in it. So you know, gotta give respect to her. She sells it too, Kathryn Hahn, everyone loves her because of Wandavision. I've been in love with her for years. And she is honestly the thing. The The reason I kept watching that movie, and she sold that twist, her delivery

James Jay Edwards:

kids, those aren't your grandparent. And the thing is, and as far as Shyamalan twist to go, this one shows up pretty early. I mean, it's probably the two thirds point that you figure this out. So you still have the third act with these kids know, when these aren't their grandparents. It's not like, you know, those aren't your grandparents. Fade to black. I mean, you have a good third of the movie.

Jonathan Correia:

And then this is where we start to see him go too far with explaining stuff, where they go into these people's mental health history. And they're like, oh, and then it turns into like the kick. Like, it's like they're trying to say like, Oh, yeah, this kid's trying to finish up their A&E, True Crime Story. And diving into the history of this old mental couple that broke into it. It's just like, do you just leave just like, let it end with them escaping and then just just end it?

James Jay Edwards:

You know, I kind of agree with you there. At that point, she should probably turn the camera off and get your it's

Jonathan Correia:

just like there's, there's over explaining. It's it's like that's why the theatrical cut of Donnie Darko is better than the director's cut. You don't have to explain everything.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I mean, that was a pretty effective twist. And, you know, just because it was simple, you know, it's like, it's it's a classic horror, horror twist. You know, it's like the person you thought you knew was not in fact, who you thought. And it just did such a great job marketing wise too, because, you know, there was that creepy trailer where it's just the footage of the old grandma, like putting herself in the oven.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, she's trying to convince the little girl to get into the oven. And you think you're like you're like, Oh, shit. Get into? Yeah, yeah. All the way in the back way back there.

Jacob Davidson:

No, but yes. So you know, sometimes the simplest twist is the best one.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Oh, I and the thing is, everybody is like oh that twist is so obvious. Well, not to me. I was sitting in the in the theater watching this. And that would hit me like a freight train. I was like, Oh my God. That's amazing.

Jonathan Correia:

It was very Hansel and Gretel.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, that that scene was, let's cruise on to Split. Which, Split? What was the twist? Yeah, that's the twist. The twist is in the mid credit scene.

Jonathan Correia:

But was there was there? Was there a twist before that though? I thought there was a lack of what? So the twist? The twist of Split is that there was no twist until the mid credits. Yeah, right. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it was a twist, Split is basically James McAvoy in an amazing performance as this guy with multiple personalities, I think he's got 23 and he kidnaps these three girls keeps him there. And and he goes through all these different personalities. And basically, it's these girls trying to escape them. And at the very end, mid credit scene, there's a news report about it. And they start talking about, about how you know, he's the beast like some kind of a supervillain, and then they're at a diner and they go, Who was that guy? What did he call himself? And then she moves out of the way the girl who's saying this? And it's Bruce Willis. And he says, Mr. Glass, this is a secret Unbreakable sequel.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. Or spin off. Well, it

James Jay Edwards:

was a sequel. Yeah, I don't know. Anyway, sequel spin off. Same universe. It was amazing.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, it's definitely the Fast and Furious Tokyo Drift of the you know, what is it the US 117 trilogy? I don't know. But basically, like yeah, took place in the universe, but there's only really like one cameo bit. Only instead of one bald white guy Vin Diesel, Oh, it's another bald white guy in Bruce Willie, you know?

James Jay Edwards:

Well, that's it. Well, that is the twist. The twist is that it is a secret Unbreakable sequel, which I thought that one was really well done. Because you're in the credits are rolling and you're like, Oh, wow. Okay. No Shyamalan twist. And this one, you know, which isn't unheard of, as we've been talking about. So you're like, Okay, you know, probably his best non twist movie, and then it hits you with it. And you're like, ah, I spoke too soon.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I think that was his most effective one. Because this this was a prime example of a film where it wasn't hinged on its twist, you know what I mean? It was even like a mid credit thing. Like, if they cut it out, it still would have worked solid as a film. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

it's not hinged. It's almost like an afterthought.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Again,

James Jay Edwards:

not the best example of mental health in a movie as discussed, although it's a you have to you have to admit it's a it's an amazing performance.

Jonathan Correia:

It's a good performance. Um,

James Jay Edwards:

and I it's written a little questionably but it's performed brilliantly,

Jonathan Correia:

but I think that's what makes it work. So well is that it is it is a bit cartoony with it. So you so it is a little forgivable on not portraying mental health in the most accurate light, because it is very comic booky. It's very cartoony so it does work a bit with

Jacob Davidson:

Kind of in retrospect kind of foreshadows the twist because it was kind of him doing his expanded comic book universe

James Jay Edwards:

right which expands to Glass.

Jonathan Correia:

I haven't seen that when either

James Jay Edwards:

You have not seen Glass Oh, okay glass well okay glass is what ties it all together. Basically, Mr. Glass, Samuel Jackson's character wants to get the beast which is James McAvoy and this Bruce Willis's character have have like a superhero name. His name's David Dunn. But anyway, he's trying to get them to fight and they're they're all in the same institution. And Sarah Paulson is their doctor. And the the the twist is, it's kind of a confusing twist. But the twist is Sarah Paulson is part of some organization that likes to flesh out superheroes and then deny their existence basically tries to keep them locked up in a silence So the world doesn't realize that they're superheroes. And at the end, David Dunn's son, Mr. Glass's mom, and one of the girls in Split has this weird Stockholm Syndrome relationship with with James McAvoy his character, they actually have all this footage and they basically expose to the world that superheroes exist. So foil Sarah Paulson's plan, not that great of a twist. It's a little reminiscent not to spoil anything. It's a little reminiscent of Old and that's all I'm going to say about old if you don't want to ruin anything

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, where it has eight endings. It just

James Jay Edwards:

endings it kind of there are a couple places where it could end not quite eight but yeah, there's a couple places here

Jonathan Correia:

this gives you a solid round number of 12 endings.

James Jay Edwards:

It does end with a pretty awesome fight between Bruce Willis and James McAvoy with McEvoy's Beast

Jonathan Correia:

which give me you know, give me shirtless James McAvoy all all you know worked out and and just beating on Bruce really like that. That sounds like a good

James Jay Edwards:

one. One of the most effective shots in Glass is and I don't know why they did. Maybe they did this to trigger him. But Bruce Willis and James McAvoy are in cells in this mental institution and they're like across the hall from each other and at one point both their doors open at the same time. And James McAvoy glances and sees Bruce Willis and cycle Wait, it's that dude i mean it's it's pretty amazingly done. The reveal on how they find out that they're both in the same place. It's pretty it's pretty crazy. Anyway, that brings us to Old which we've already talked about and we don't want to spoil so we're not gonna talk Shyamalan twists with old What about movies with Shyamalan twists that aren't S yamalan? Like we've talked at n useam about Antebellum which A tebellum? I don't know if I w nt to spoil it, but it steals i s twist from one of the movies t at we've discussed already.

Jacob Davidson:

The first thing that comes to mind in terms of Shyamalan esque twist would be In the Mouth of Madness. John Carpenter's movie, like every talking spoilers are richer

James Jay Edwards:

spoiler

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, well, you know, just the twist in that is that it turns out Sam Neal's character was a character all along. Like, he was within the story the whole time. And he's nothing more than a character and Sutter Cane books and, you know, eventually, you know, bad the story overtakes reality. So, yeah, I mean, particularly for its time, I think it was rather shocking.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you guys seen Identity?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, that's a great example.

James Jay Edwards:

That's another one where and this one, it changes the entire movie, if you know the twist. So I'm not going to say what it is. But identity is one of those that like, when you get to the twist, everything that you've seen up to that point changes. So anyway, but it's you know, John Cusack, and Rebecca de Mornay, I think is one it's Ray Liotta, it's, I mean, it talks about an all star cast, you know, they're all stranded at this hotel in the rain, and they can't go anywhere.

Jonathan Correia:

And then they start to piece together. Why are they all here? Because there's something that brought them all to this hotel.

James Jay Edwards:

They all have the same birthday. And they're like, all this is just too weird. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

But that that's, uh, I think, you know, because there was definitely a slew of movies that came out where it was, you know, studios trying to cash in on the Shyamalan twists and stuff. And I think identity was probably the most successful of those knock offs, you know, not only just like at the box office, but just like in pulling off its thing. I thought. It's not a great movie, but it's very solid. You know, that was one that like, for some reason played in my house a lot when I was a kid. So I just have a lot of fun, fun memories with that one.

James Jay Edwards:

And of course, there's The Usual Suspects, which is another one of those movies that when you get to the twist, it changes everything that happened before it.

Jonathan Correia:

What about Nicole Kidman and The Others?

Jacob Davidson:

Ah, that that works

James Jay Edwards:

that's another but see that steals its twist from a Shyamalan movie that we've talked about, as well. So

Jonathan Correia:

but it's a fun ghost story, like more of a ghost story and like, yeah, I I just got the rerelease of that on blu ray. I need to revisit that one. Cuz I just remembered loving that one a lot when I was growing up like that was one of the that was one of my gateway horror films as a kid, you know?

James Jay Edwards:

Alright, let's get out of here. What are your favorite Shyamalan-- you know what I really want to hear from what are your favorite Shyamalan twists that aren't Shyamalan you know because I know that we kind of just glossed over it because we are running a little long. So yeah, hit us up and let us know. And also let us know what your fav are we crazy that we think that Signs is kind of a dumb twist. Let us know

Jonathan Correia:

Do you agree with us that The Happening is his magnum opus and the best thing that he's ever made?

James Jay Edwards:

I don't know if I would say that. I do think it's under appreciated. I don't know... it's it's not his worst movie. I mean, yeah, there's it's not even close to his eye. In fact, I would say Last Airbender and After Earth are both worse. Because they don't have twists. People expect that what oh, that's what's wrong with

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, not the whitewash a Avatar and you know,

James Jay Edwards:

alright, let's get out here. Um, so yeah, let us know what your thoughts on this are. You can let us know at the Eye On Horror Facebook, the iHorror Facebook Eye On Horror, Twitter, the Eye On Horror, instagram, ihorror.com. I don't know. We're not hard to find our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So go and rock with them. They're making a new record they've been recording and our artwork is Chris Fisher. Give him some love to Yeah. And. And that's it for us. So we'll see you hopefully in a couple weeks, bending our schedules go. But uh, we'll see you soon. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison.

Jonathan Correia:

And I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.