Eye On Horror

R.L. Stine - Walking Fear Street and Giving Ourselves Goosebumps

July 19, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 13
Eye On Horror
R.L. Stine - Walking Fear Street and Giving Ourselves Goosebumps
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, the guys discuss the Fear Street Trilogy, which leads to a bigger discussion about the works of R.L Stine.

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James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror The official podcast of iHorror.com. This is Episode 70 otherwise known as season four Episode 13. I'm your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other other host Jacob Davison, how you doing? Jacob doing?

Jacob Davidson:

Good. Just got off of work and excited to be back. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

We are recording this in the dead of night because that's when our scheduling is and I just got home from a screening of Stillwater. The new Matt Damon. Kind of like a legal thriller, but not really. It's very schizophrenic, but it's not horror, so I'm not gonna waste time on it. Jacob just got home from work. And Correia. Your other other hosts? Tell us why we're recording in the middle of the night

Jonathan Correia:

dude. Welcome to Eye On Horror after hours where things get steamy

Jacob Davidson:

Eye On Horror after dark.

Jonathan Correia:

We're recording at weird hours because Jacobs back to work. And I'm on the road again. I have been in Minnesota. For the last week. I'm actually flying out to South Dakota tomorrow. And then I'm going to start my every other day hopping only this time we're driving because you know, flying sucks. And apparently, rental cars are impossible to book right now because they sold a lot of them during the pandemic. And now everyone's going on vacation. And it's it's a logistical nightmare. And I hate everything. We were supposed to drive to South Dakota, but those fuckers wouldn't let us take the rental card there. So we have to fly for an hour and a half. That's stupid. Yeah, I'm back on the road. So it's it's midnight. 30 here, no quarter to 1am here. So

James Jay Edwards:

he's taking one for the team because he's two hours in the future.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it's it's only it's only quarter to 11 for me and Jacob.

Jonathan Correia:

But Minnesota is great. I love Minnesota. Shout out to our Minnesota listeners because I like I like a it's it's it's nice to wherever Minnesota

James Jay Edwards:

Are you were in?

Jonathan Correia:

Woodbury, so not far from St. Paul. Kind of, like 20 minutes from the border to Wisconsin. Okay, Wisconsin. Also, we went there the other day, Wisconsin is pretty dope to got to say you guys are killing it over here.

James Jay Edwards:

When my band used to tour every summer. One of my favorite places was Duluth, Minnesota, because it's way up there. It's right on one of the lakes. I don't know which one.

Jonathan Correia:

There's 1000 here. Yeah. And it's known as the 1000. lakes state is Oh, it's by the lake.

James Jay Edwards:

But Duluth is on one of them. And it is a beautiful little town.

Jacob Davidson:

Did you try the cheese? In Wisconsin?

Jonathan Correia:

It was Yeah, it's in a note but I had a keto taco, which was just basically like pork carnitas. And they had like seven or eight like, Li big leaves as the shell it was fucking phenomenal.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's get on with this because we got some catching up to do because our schedules that we recorded two episodes in the same day last time. And now we're recording in the middle of the night. First thing I want to talk about here, because we talked about a little bit with ama Have you guys both seen Werewolves Within?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh my god, it was that amazing or what?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh my god, it was a blast. It was actually my first movie back at the Aero theatre. Because beyond fest was doing a premiere screening of air pre screening of it. And oh my god, it was such a fun crowd movie. Like the opening five seconds. Like we were already laughing our asses off.

James Jay Edwards:

It's great. It's like a it's kind of like a who done it. Like it reminded me of like Knives Out or Clue. Except instead of trying to decide who the killer is. You have to try and decide who the whip the werewolf is. Oh, it's it's brilliant. And everybody who's been watching TV during the pandemic recognizes Lily the At&T girl. She's in it.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And it actually reminded me of The Beast Must Die.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's kind of similar because another one where you have to guess who the werewolf is, but I'm not quite as obvious as The Beast Must Die.

Jacob Davidson:

Well, also no werewolf clock. Yeah, there was a fan which I which you know, could have been improved with a werewolf clock.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, the thing is, we're Werewolves Within is like every character is a red herring. So it's like just what do you think? You know, and then you're like, Okay, that's not it. And that okay, no, this is the guy. Well, no. Okay, no, no, this chick is the Well, no, you know, fun.

Jacob Davidson:

keeps you on your toes.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it totally does. It was so much fun.

Jacob Davidson:

And And speaking of actually got that issue Fangoria that aima did the photography for and is great. Yeah, because it's a glow in the dark cover,

Jonathan Correia:

which is awesome. So cool. And I'm gonna say it right now. I want Sam Richardson and milaana young trub I want them to be the next Abbott and Costello or chris farley and David Spade they needed like, just keep doing a bunch of random movies where they're the two comedic leads because their chemistry was fantastic. And they were so funny together.

James Jay Edwards:

The whole chemistry of the whole cast was fantastic. Oh, yeah, no, everybody

Jacob Davidson:

was great

James Jay Edwards:

for a while that, um, that stereotypical gay couple kind of bothered me I'm like they're leaning hard to this but then I realized every character in the damn movies a stereotype

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, their characters.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, yeah, exactly. And then I'm like, okay, it doesn't bother me as much now that I know that they're leaning into everybody that hard Yeah, I

Jacob Davidson:

mean think about you know, they're because they got the gay couple and then they've got like the super right wing couple who are saying you know, I don't want to say exactly what but you know, like typical right wing shit,

Jonathan Correia:

but also those are all real people in Vermont like I was telling Lindsey when we're watching I was like, No, they This is like you go into a small town in Vermont you will meet almost every single one of these people there

Jacob Davidson:

also is a New England i can contest test that is basically Vermont

Jonathan Correia:

which is great. I love seeing you know, accurate representation of New England in films. It makes me very happy

James Jay Edwards:

same did that did he did you guys see the Forever Purge?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I thought and I liked it.

James Jay Edwards:

I was okay with it. Um, Purge movies. I've said this before purge movies. And me. I love the concept more than I love the movies. And this is more of the same. It's like, and they all start off so strong. But then they devolve into these just shoot 'em ups. And you know, I am I think I like you know, I when they kill like there are a couple of great kills in the Forever Purge that have nothing to do with guns. And those are the good ones. And I think every one of the movies have that. But this one is a different kind of it because usually the the Purge movies that we see usually are like, is set in urban areas in the, you know, middle of the city and stuff. This one is in like a Texas border town. And and of course it makes its, you know, thinly veiled political statements not not even not even thinly veiled. Not at all. It was a bit heavy handed. Yeah, but but if you think about it, if there really was a purge, that's what would happen. Pretty much. But I did think it was funny that because the the thing is the forever purge, the purge ends. And then there's a faction of the public that doesn't stop doing it. And so all of a sudden, all of the law abiding citizens who ended the purge, they start running for the border. And I just thought it was so funny that like, it was just a funny juxtaposition that you have all these Americans trying to escape the violence in their country by going to Mexico.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Yeah, that was that was a fun twist. Also, I really dug it because it's actually I actually consider it to be a horror Western, you know? Yeah, it's definitely got those elements. And there's, there's even a bunch of cowboy themed perjures so I thought that was pretty neat. Also it for what it was, it did have an incredible sequence where they go into an El Paso movie theater that's showing Dracula during the purge or during the forever purge, and I thought that was really cool and also made me think a little bit of Fade To Black for reasons.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I still need to see that one. I've just started going to the theaters again. So we're working my way I had to add to start off with the Sparks Brothers documentary which is not horror, but it is absolutely phenomenal. I think everyone should see it. I've been listening to Sparks non stopped because of it.

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, a great band

Jonathan Correia:

Horror adjacent, Zola. Have you guys seen Zola yet? And

James Jay Edwards:

how is this horror? Jason? I have not seen it.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, no money at it.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, because it's, it's it's a terrifying thing. If you've ever been in that awkward situation where you meet really weird people and you go to a second location with them. That's this movie. It's just getting It's weird. It's just getting stuck in like the most uncomfortable and like worst scenario you could possibly be with the worst people ever and I mean, who hasn't been there especially when on a bender, you know? But yeah, it's also one of the fun As movies of the year so I can't recommend it enough.

James Jay Edwards:

Also horror adjacent while we're horror adjacent thing. Did you guys see Black Widow?

Jacob Davidson:

I did.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. And I have to say this ray winds wind stones character. Come on that that character is Harvey Weinstein, right? Like, like I'm 90% certain he was either written that way, or the actor took the inspiration, but I swear to fucking god that the main villain in a fucking Marvel movie is inspired by Harvey Weinstein. I know that Scarlett Johansen owns the Black Widow character.

James Jay Edwards:

But didn't you guys think that Florence Pugh and David Harbour stole this movie right out from under her?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, of course. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

they were they were phenomenal on Rachel Weisz.

James Jay Edwards:

Her not some I mean, she was good. But Florence Pugh and David Harvard were so hilarious like Florence. Yes. She's making fun of Scarlett Johansson. It's like, you know, because she's like, basically the Russian equivalent of Black Widow. She, you know, she's in Russia doing it. And she likes to make fun of how she poses when she fights. And then she tries it. She's not.

Jonathan Correia:

And the whole time she's just grunting she's like, you know, when you get low and you do the hair thing, and you're you're posing your opposer and then she does the posting and she's like,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, my no

Jacob Davidson:

David Harbour as Red gGardian. That was a definite highlight of the movie. Oh, yeah. He's,

Jonathan Correia:

he's great. I just loved his his fishing story with his father was was gold.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And yeah, I didn't realize it. It took me a bit because there was there's one bit where Francis Pugh is just going on about her, sorry Florence Pugh, are going on about her vest and how it's a great vessel. It's got all these pockets and whatnot. And I was like, this is a great bit, but what the fuck is going on here. And then at the end of the movie, she gives the best to a sorry, spoiler. She gives the vest to Black Widow. And suddenly you're like, Oh, this movie is an origin story for Black Widows outfit at the beginning of Infinity War. I didn't realize I needed that. But I got Why not?

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, clearly, I mean, I don't want to spoil, Endgame. But clearly, this takes place before Infinity War, it actually is right after Civil War, because the Avengers, half of them are in jail. And Black Widow is on the run. And that's how she ends up where she is. So it is a bit of an origin story. But it's, um, it's real contained to it's not as huge scale as these Marvel movies usually are. It's more of like Mission Impossible than it is the Avengers to get

Jonathan Correia:

there's no giant blue, you know, beam coming from the sky. And the action is great. Like there's definitely a heavy Bourne and influence throughout. But I still say the best part of that movie is watching the credits and seeing female director female writers producers just all over and then produced the movie too. Yeah, like that. And it's awesome because it made over 200 million this weekend, like opening weekend. So

James Jay Edwards:

it's one of those things like Wonder Woman, if they had given Wonder Woman to a male director, the people would have burned the feeders down, you know. So Black Widow is another one of those where if they had given that to a male director, there would have been hell to pay

Jonathan Correia:

if they had made Black Widow like phase one, when they were like overly sexualizing her all the time, it would have been terrible. Because like Iron Man 2 Oof,

James Jay Edwards:

they probably would have given it to a male director too, though, so. So it's good that we waited this long for

Jonathan Correia:

it sad. We had to wait this long, but we got a better product, I think because of it.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, definitely. Um, and on, on that note of kind of female led action movies that kind of horror, adjasent. I was actually at the premiere of Gunpowder Milkshake at the new Beverly on 35 millimeter. Oh, how

Jonathan Correia:

is it? I hear it's more like a Jackie Chan than John Wick.

Jacob Davidson:

But no, I mean, it was so much fun, you know, and Karen Gillan really gets to shine and without spoiling too much like there's also there's this great big with like these gangsters dressed as universal monsters and yeah no desert there are some great shootouts and beat downs and again don't want to go too into it because spoilers by the no just it's it's some jaw dropping stuff

Jonathan Correia:

first of all would totally join that gang Second of all, if we were to start a universal monsters theme gang, what is your outfit guys?

Jacob Davidson:

Gil man calling the Gil man I got the Invisible Man.

Jonathan Correia:

You got the Invisible Man. You just want to run around naked. That's I mean it was

Jacob Davidson:

more just mask cuz you know, it's like, you know The dead presidents from Point Break you know we just had the masks.

James Jay Edwards:

Well there you go. I would just bandage my face that

Jonathan Correia:

I would go Wolf Man personally. That's because you got nards I got I got shot in the nerds with the T shirt gun.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh you never forget Beyond Fest

Jonathan Correia:

Beyond Fest I miss you. My nuts no but me I do.

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah no just gunpowder milkshake bow a lot of fun. definitely recommended. See it in theaters if you can, I guess if you're in LA. I think it's playing for a few more nights. So it probably out of theaters but then this plays but it was just so much fun.

Jonathan Correia:

I actually finally cracked into my copy of Severin's Tales of the Uncanny the documentary they made about anthology horror anthologies. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

I love that. I love that documentary.

Jonathan Correia:

I got it's, it's now a part of my top five quarantine movies like movies that were made during quarantine. I thought it was so well done. And I it's I do this all the time. I watch a documentary about genre and I'll buy a bunch of movies from it. And so I've just been like collecting I got a my anthology collection has grown exponentially because of it. But it did get me to finally also crack open my copy of From Beyond the Grave. And I'm so sad. I haven't watched that movie sooner because that movie that's a good one. It's phenomenal. But I have to mention the story with Donald Pleasance and his daughter. his actual daughter is one of the creepiest and Well, most well done like horror anthology shorts. It's such a slow burn. So weird. It's so weird. I love but I loved it so much like I there was just so much with it. I didn't understand, but it was just yeah. And she looks so much like him. They got the same eyes.

Jacob Davidson:

It's the devil's eyes.

Jonathan Correia:

It's a weird one man. But yeah, absolutely phenomenal.

James Jay Edwards:

Speaking of Donald Pleasance, I just want to say shout out to Scream Factory for making my year by announcing Alone in the fucking Dark.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yes, finally.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh my god. Anybody who's listened to 10 minutes of any episode of our podcast knows that that is like a holy grail on blu ray for me and Scream Factory is coming through hardcore.

Jacob Davidson:

it's finally happening.

Jonathan Correia:

I thought you're gonna say thank you for forcing me to buy rebuy. Halloween one through five yet again. screen for not doing that.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, doing that.

Jonathan Correia:

I did it DiabolikDVD at a really good deal on them. So I figured I figured why the fuck not?

James Jay Edwards:

I would feel like I was disrespecting Alone in the Dark if I didn't preorder it. So I did preorder it, but I'm not buying the Halloween movies again.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I got I gotta get a 4k TV before I do that. But yeah, no, I'm excited. You're Alone in the Dark too. I was very lucky to have seen it theatrically at the new Beverly all night horror show a couple years back. And and yet it just blew the audience away. So I'm honestly surprised it took this long.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm excited for more people to see it because there are a lot of people who know the reputation but haven't seen it. And now that exactly

Jacob Davidson:

olders first movie, it's so

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, in that cast Martin Landau. Yeah. Jack Palance is in it

Jacob Davidson:

Donald Pleasence

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, with that cast. How the hell did it take this long? I know that it was a rights thing. But still, How the hell did you take this long?

Jacob Davidson:

Back in ontologies, I actually got a new release from a new label called culture shock releasing called Creep Tales. Ooh, it's like the shot on video anthology from the 80s. And so it's something I caught I think online A long time ago. And yeah, it's just it's a goofy fun movie. Like the framing devices like these fools steal a bunch of VHS tapes and pizza for their monster party on Halloween. And there's these six stories. It's kind of a long Anthology, too. It's like an hour and 45 minutes. But it's got all these wacky stories like, like, they're like, there's a simple one. We're just like a kid's afraid there's a monster in his closet. There's a woman held hostage by her crazy aunt. There's a bunch of hunters after a werewolf. And this is interesting. There's one about a purse snatcher played by SpongeBob Square Pants his own Tom Kenny, who also sings about his first snatching. Except these steals from the wrong old lady and steals the wrong purse.

James Jay Edwards:

I first saw Creep Tales because it came with it came on one of those public domain like you know, 10 movies on one disk for you know, five bucks, and the transfer was so bad. Like it was it was terrible. I'm really glad that somebody because I've always liked it. But it I'm really glad somebody is actually restored it.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, this is it. Pretty good transferred to like it's a lot clearer now like way better than anything I've ever seen before

Jonathan Correia:

it's also just great seeing Tom Kenny pop up and stuff and then you hear the SpongeBob voice go like if you ever seen shakes the clown he plays like cocaine had a cocaine addicted clown and there's just like one part where he does like a fat line, and then just does the SpongeBob voice. And it's just the weirdest thing where suddenly my childhood is just like, warped where it's just like, Oh, God, is that is that just his coke voice?

Jacob Davidson:

That raises a lot of questions about sponge Bob's recreational habits.

Jonathan Correia:

He just soaks it up like a sponge. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

It was trying to do the Spongebob laugh.

Jonathan Correia:

This is why we don't record late at night. No.

James Jay Edwards:

He just got off work. So we know he's not drunk. I don't know what's going on.

Jacob Davidson:

Trying to do the SpongeBob laughs You know,

Jonathan Correia:

I thought it was pretty solid.

James Jay Edwards:

What else has been going on with you guys?

Jacob Davidson:

Um, well, I've been going well, like I said, I've been going to the new Beverly a lot. I saw Once Upon a Time in China parts one and two on Monday. And then on Tuesday, I saw Alligator and Jackie Brown and honor the late great Robert forsters birthday.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh nice.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, so now those those were a lot of fun and man and speaking of movies that should be on blu ray. Why Why haven't we got Alligator on blu ray

Jonathan Correia:

I was just about to say that no, no,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, no, we need Aligator on blu ray like in honor Robert Forester it's it's what he would have wanted

James Jay Edwards:

now that we're getting Alone in the Dark on blu ray we can start focusing our collective energy on aligator now as we show world needs it because it worked for Alone in the Dark. Yeah, it was all us.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. No, we deserve the credit for that one.

Jonathan Correia:

Now, this isn't something I've watched but do you guys follow Kino Lorber on Twitter

James Jay Edwards:

because I know what you're gonna

Jonathan Correia:

do cuz this is this was one of the greatest interactions I've ever seen on Twitter from like a labor labelled to its audience is Kino announced that they're releasing Misery on in 4k, which I'm super excited for. I'm definitely gonna preorder that I fucking love that movie. And their 4k transfers are really good their Mad Max release was phenomenal. Even Hannibal was like really good looking. I'm not as good as that Howard the Duck transfer in 4k like holy shit. That movie had no right looking that good. Anyways, I digress. So on it, they basically say that they have an agreement with MGM now. And so you know, there's always and whatever label God announces, we're aware releasing this, there's always some jackhole that's like, Oh, well, why don't you release this? Oh, why don't you really need to release this? It's usually James shouting about Alone in the Dark, but he's not doing that recently. So someone said, hey, why so why don't you guys release, Sleepaway Camp 3, and this was just a guy who just doesn't want to who didn't get the Scream Factory release and he doesn't want to play scalper prices. But Keno replied saying we have no interest in releasing Sleepaway Camp 3. So this guy laid into like leaned hard into it and he just goes, you guys put out It's Pat the movie on blu ray, but Sleepaway Camp 3 is just one step too far. 10 four, and it's like, Oh, nice. You tried like, you would think that it would have just ended there that they wouldn't like you know, respond. No, Kino Lorber fucking thrashed this guy and said, We don't need to defend ourselves. But It's Pat and many other crappy titles were a part of a package of films we acquired. Take all or take none. Also, It's Pat had never been out on HD on it on HD. This shitty sequel has already been released on blu ray.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

get this guy some ointment and and Sleepaway Camp 3

James Jay Edwards:

wasn't It's Pat written by Tarantino?

Jacob Davidson:

Whoa,

Jonathan Correia:

I think he he ghostwrote or like

James Jay Edwards:

script doctored it.

Jonathan Correia:

It's one of those too But yeah, he definitely helped out because he was friends with the woman behind it. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Was there a Julia Sweeney or? Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I believe so.

James Jay Edwards:

She's, she's in Pulp Fiction. She's the, the the the owner of the red car wrecking lot that they go to that the wolf goes to breakfast with. So yeah, they're all pals so Yeah, I think so there is some historical merit to its Pat. Not that there isn't any to sleepaway camp three, but they have a point. sleepaway camp three has already been done but

Jonathan Correia:

did like how they explained like yeah, no I we've put out some crappy movies but the reason behind is because it's it's all or nothing on it and it's like yeah, you know, Kino does put out some crappy movies sometimes but it's always I love it when they do because it's like Kino does have a bit of a prestigious you know, they do put out like some very important films and so it's always fun when they do put out like like they'll put out like a beautiful brand new restored for the first time ever Metropolis And then turn around and do It's Pat like I love that about them that though they're more than willing to do that

James Jay Edwards:

you just want to Criterion copy of Freddy Got Fingered it just whenever you see something like that from Keno? It gives you hope that criterions could you freak out someday?

Jonathan Correia:

someday? Instead, they're just gonna keep doing Wes Anderson movies.

James Jay Edwards:

Have either Did you either guys watch the Tomorrow War?

Jacob Davidson:

No, not yet, although I've been hearing good

James Jay Edwards:

Good is is a bit of a hard sell. It is, it's things. fun. It's not a good movie, you really have to suspend your disbelief. And any you have to suspend your disbelief with any movie that deals with time travel, except The Butterfly Effect because that was 100% legit. But anyway, I mean, it is what it is. And you know, basically the premises, mankind is fighting a war 30 years in the future. And they're, and it's the earth against these aliens. And Earth is getting its ass kicked. So in order to find soldiers, they go back in time and start drafting people from now. And they're barely training them. They're throwing a gun in their hand, and then they're jumping into the future. And Chris Pratt is like the main character and he jumps forward in time. And, you know, it's, I mean, it's a fun little disposable science fiction movie. But when he jumps forward in time, things go wrong with the jump. And when he lands in the future, it's right out of Saving Private Ryan, it is pretty horrific. That's probably that scene is worth dialing it up on prime alone. Just you know, the, the his initial jump to the future is just horrifying.

Jonathan Correia:

Two things real quick. So when you think of the perfect time travel movie, it's Butterfly Effect. Like that's your go to time travel, or like I'm not judging, I'm just, that's your pick.

James Jay Edwards:

I was actually just joking. Not even joking, because I'm completely serious. But two other members of San Diego film critic society jokingly threatened to kick me out. Because I said Butterfly Effect would be in my top 10 of all time. So yeah, I would say that.

Jonathan Correia:

No, no, no, no judgment. I mean, to each their clone. But yeah, that's just that that is it's just an interesting Hill to

James Jay Edwards:

say to each their clone.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And second, if they draft people from the past, that means that person isn't in the future, or their can is.

James Jay Edwards:

Now see, you're starting to date, you're starting to figure it out that

Jonathan Correia:

they may not think that through.

James Jay Edwards:

No, no, no, they did.

Jonathan Correia:

If they bring Sarah Connor to the future to fight the robots, there's no john Connor.

James Jay Edwards:

No, this isn't spoiling too much. But basically, when they when they're screening people to send into the future, they have to make sure that they are dead by the time 30 years comes by. So that's why when they put Chris Pratt on this machine, and they look it up there go, Okay, he's eligible. And then he's like, oh, what the fuck does that mean? And he figures out that he's actually going to die in seven years. Whoa, you know, but but they always say that they won't tell them how or exactly what day or any of that, you know, it's it's all secretive. Because, you know, they don't want to change the future.

Jonathan Correia:

They don't want to change the future. Really, when they're taking people out of the past.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, no, because if they change the future, if that person lives longer, and then there's two of them in the future, it'll fuck everything up. So they do consider that in the Tomorrow War.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I'm glad they really thought that out. As sound sounds like a great plan.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I'm sure it's completely intricately told to rival Back to the Future.

Jonathan Correia:

It basically sounds like the reverse action version of that episode of South Park when people from the future came back in time to to work

Jacob Davidson:

are kinda like, like a side movie to the Edge of Tomorrow.

Jonathan Correia:

I was about to say this does sound similar to Edge of Tomorrow but Edge of Tomorrow rules so

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, it truly does.

Jonathan Correia:

I was just thinking about like, I saw the trailer for Jungle Cruise before Black Widow. And I couldn't help but sit there and be like, man, Emily Blunt is going to carry the shit out of that movie, isn't she? It was just saying a lot because The Rock is also in The Rocks. Great. I mean, come on Rampage. But that's

James Jay Edwards:

what I thought about A Quiet Place. Part Two and millison Simmons carry the shit out of that movie so

Jonathan Correia:

well. Yeah, they didn't really bad is also true. They didn't give Emily Blunt anything in that movie,

James Jay Edwards:

which is weird because it was her husband who wrote and directed it.

Jonathan Correia:

Hey, I mean, you know, he had more and more interesting story for you know, the daughter that happens.

James Jay Edwards:

It wasn't more interesting story of either you guys dove into the Fear Street movies. Oh yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

I was at the outdoor premiere of Fear Street 1994

James Jay Edwards:

I saw the pictures of that. Did they only show 1994? They didn't show like, 78?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, that one.

James Jay Edwards:

I've seen all three of them. Even though when we record this, the third one doesn't drop until tomorrow, but I'm cool like that. So I've seen the whole trilogy. I, I can tell you that the third in my opinion, 1666 is the weakest. But the reason is, it doesn't lead as hard into the nostalgia. I love 94 because it was like watching a last Scream movie kind of right. You know, he's just just the whole aesthetic. And I don't care what people are saying. Yeah, I don't care if that Garbage song actually came out in 95, every single little drop of that movie is freakin perfect.

Jonathan Correia:

Did you see the tweet where someone was like, oh, for those who are angry about music about certain songs and Fear Street not matching with the year. Wait till you get to 1666 because none of that music is from 1666

James Jay Edwards:

Well, here's the funny thing, the needle drop stop and 1666

Jonathan Correia:

goods because they didn't have needles, then.

James Jay Edwards:

Here's the deal that would that they do jump back forward to 1994 in order to wrap things up. And you do get needle drops then, but when they're in 1666, there's no needle drops. But 78 it's more the same. It's it's like it and grant Yeah, Friday 13th came out in 1980. So to those people who are like it, it kind of it's actually more of a 75 I think then an 80 but it is definitely a slasher. So that that's kind of fun to

Jonathan Correia:

this, like 78 has a 70s vibe but it's got the 80s setting, you know if that makes sense, like the summer camp. Yeah, killings. That was an 80s thing. But yeah, overall, it's and one of the things that I found really funny about because I've only seen the first two I could have watched watch them, but I wanted to experience it as like, they they kind of intended like with it coming out each week. And I like and honestly the wait has made it like really good, especially when they do the recaps. It's been working really well for this.

James Jay Edwards:

Well my screeners have actually come one every week. So I have had to wait, I can see it a couple days.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, you see it a couple days early, gotcha. But I gotta say one of the things you know, it's almost a fault but I actually kind of enjoy it. At least with the first two is it gets so kind of wrapped, like the story is progressing. And they keep you know, the witch stuff going, but it feels like the movie is so the movies are so wrapped up in their, in the nostalgia and and pulling off you know, like a 90 screen knockoff or a slasher film, late 70s, early 80s or so. And then all sudden, like when it gets to the third act it's like oh shit, we got to do that we actually have to like progress the story more so and then it just like it just always feels like there's this one moment where they go oh shit, we have to continue this and then they like shifts. And then because it feels like it wraps up and then there's another 20 minutes and I love it because I because I'm having so much fun with these movies. I want more.

James Jay Edwards:

What's funny about them in funny not funny "Haha" but funny interesting is that there's definitely like a kid's movie vibe to it. There's like a Stand By Me, Goonies kind of a vibe. Yeah, but these movies are brutally violent. Like, I mean, and especially set. Especially 1978 they actually kill kids in that damn movie. Yeah

Jonathan Correia:

I was just like, yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

are you kidding me? You cut that kid's head off? What I mean

Jacob Davidson:

They went for it.

James Jay Edwards:

oh, people who got pissed that Spielberg killed the kid in Jaws really gonna be upset.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, so many people have it is so many people are like, yeah, you can't kill kids on screen in your movie. Like that's a no no. And then Fear Street's just like Alright, hold my beer. Like it just goes for in there. And they're brutal to like, you see the axe go into the face when that when the one kid with the glasses gets merked in the cabin. That was brutal.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. A lot of split faces open.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And I love and I get so hyped at the end of each one when they preview the next movie. Like Yeah, they they they knew how to release these right? And I'm loving that. It It is going in reverse. But the story is progressing forward, you know, because usually with these type of movies, they start when the curse begins, and then they show the ending. Whereas this one, it's kind of like it starts in the third act, but and then you're going back in time, but the story is progressing linearly and how they do it. It's I'm enjoying it quite a bit. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

the kids are solving the mystery and in order to solve the mystery, they have to just keep going back in time. Right. And the thing about the third one is a lot of it is about the witch that is possessing these killers, Sarah Fier, and it took me three movies to realize Fier if you spell it differently, it's Fear Street. I know. It took me five finally it clicked in the middle of a third movie. I'm like, ah, Fier Street. Hmm.

Jonathan Correia:

It only took me two movies for it to click.

James Jay Edwards:

But the thing is, you know, if you watch the first two movies that she does not escape this persecution of a witch, because that's what a lot of 1666 is her running from the townspeople who think that she's gonna be that she's a witch, you know, she doesn't escape that. So then it becomes about how she gets caught and how it becomes a curse. You know, and, and it becomes just more about solving the mystery.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, man, you know, I just realized, because they kind of do the same thing with the second one, you know, the sister is gonna die in it. And they

James Jay Edwards:

pull the rug out on that one.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, and that's the thing is that, like, I it just dawned on me that both sisters had C in their first name, and she just goes by C. Baxter. And I knew which sister was gonna die the whole time. And why is that thing and then like, at the end, they pull the rug? Like, wait, you were Ziggy. And I was like, Well, yeah, right. Do you think it just dawned on me that that was that that was a thing. Okay, cool layers. I'm learning more. I love it. I can't wait for all of them to be out. And then I'm gonna wait a couple months and then just marathon all three in a row. Like, it's and you're right. It does have that RL Stein. flair to it, but it's cool seeing it and like as an R rated type deal and they go for man that bread slicer kill and the

Jacob Davidson:

man like and and also I like this style of all the different slashers because they each have their own kind of aesthetic and

James Jay Edwards:

sockin each one of the killers. Oh, that axe head guy is terrifying.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, when he's running, man. But it's still I think the the crowning achievement especially the first one nails it perfectly is they actually casted teenagers, These aren't like they don't they all are of they all look of age, they all at the right age, but they're actually well rounded characters, especially 1994. Like, you they had these like typical, what you would think are the typical stereotypes. And then like they actually like, crafted them and like, had them be well rounded in like real character. So like, when you see some of them die, you're actually feeling and I really dug that they that they weren't trying to be like, cuz everyone's always like, Oh, we have these high school characters that are movies. So we're doing a John Hughes thing. Oh, it's very John Hughes thing, No, these are actual, cuz John Hughes' things were all archetypes anyways, but these were they felt like real characters. So I was able to like connect more with it. It was

James Jay Edwards:

these ones aren't archetypes at all. well rounded. Yeah, we were talking about the archetypes in Werewolves Within these ones are not at all

Jonathan Correia:

Kind of with 77, 77 they weren't as well rounded to

James Jay Edwards:

78. You mean 78 the camp one

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, the camp one.

James Jay Edwards:

But but the ones that weren't that as well rounded are the secondary ones. Right? You know that? Basically the Sunnyvale ones but the Shadyside one? Yeah, totally.

Jonathan Correia:

I do feel that. The 78 also had a lot more characters, so you didn't get to spend as much time with each one, 94 it was it was much more contained character-wise

James Jay Edwards:

wait till you get to 1666. Here's the thing about 1666. And this is actually a little hokey. Just about every actor from the first two movies is playing a role in the 17th century.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, they tease that at the end of the second one. And honestly, that got me so hyped the because at the end when they show that shift and all that, yeah, I was like, Okay, I'm down for this great shift. Yeah, because also it's it it. I haven't seen 3 obviously. But my speculation with is that it's not going back in time and that Sarah Feir is making the main character relive all this and that's why the familiar faces are, are playing those characters. You know, like a, like a Wizard of Oz type deal.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, but you you kind of see it at the end of two when she kind of goes into that trance. And you know, you can tell that she's kind of teleported into that body. So yeah, that is but but all of her friends go with her.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it was like, like Wizard of Oz, you know, you were there. And you were there. You were there. And you were there when there were monkeys.

James Jay Edwards:

Because we're the kings of segways. Let's segue this into our topic, which is kind of going to be RL Stein, and how he kind of influenced our impressionable ages. I guess. I was a little older when the when these Fear Street and Goosebumps books came out. So I was more into the Goosebumps books. Mainly because they were quick reads, I could just you know, pick one up for a few bucks. Read it. And they were pretty much all the same. But I loved them because they were I could just burn through them real quick. And I love the Goosebumps TV show. Yeah, because they actually followed the books. And that's also kind of what I loved about the Goosebumps movies is that they didn't. What they did is, if you haven't seen the movies, it basically the monsters from the books come out and terrorize the town.

Jacob Davidson:

becomes meta. Yeah, yeah, they got Jack, Jack Black of all people to play RL Stine,

James Jay Edwards:

and Slappy the dummy.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, right. And the invisible boy. Yeah. Yeah. So he gets to do a lot of roles in those.

James Jay Edwards:

So I was always more into Goosebumps than Fear Street. I think when it comes to RL Stine. What about you guys?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I feel kind of similar though. I was younger. Of course. I didn't. I saw a while I was in the target demographic for those types of books. So I just yeah, ate him up. And also I do feel like it was kind of a great entry level horror especially for someone like me, who was very easily scared as a child. So yeah, I've been I've read a bunch of those books. And I was already like, the Choose Your Own Adventure Goosebumps books, or you know, it's like you're in the book and like you, if you're getting attacked by monsters and stuff.

James Jay Edwards:

Give Yourself Goosebumps is what those are

Jacob Davidson:

Yes Give Yourself Goosebumps. Oh, yeah, called that was some good times. I never actually did read any of those Fear Street books. I don't really remember if there was any particular reason. But, ya know, I read a bunch of the Goosebumps books, mostly because I had an older sister and she loved the Goosebumps books. So she would get a bunch of them. And then I get the hand me downs. Yeah, also was a big fan of the TV show, which used to be on Fox Kids. And it is kind of funny with those types of things. Because like, yeah, like a young Ryan Gosling was even in an episode. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

when I think of the TV show is a theme songs go in, and then they're like, going through the town. And when they get to the dog in his eyes, he like, he like he barks along.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, so Oh, man, I used to creep me out so much.

Jonathan Correia:

Goosebumps, you're in for a scare.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Man, I I actually was kind of I kind of, even though I was the target demographic, I kind of missed the Goosebumps reading phenomena. You know? I? I don't know. I guess I just never I think I had a couple of the Choose Your Own Adventure ones. But I do remember watching the show growing up. And there was one kid in my in like the first grade whose parents wouldn't let him watch it. So after each episode would premiere I'd call him and tell him what happened in the episode. That that's about it. And then I didn't know about Fear Street at all until they announced the movie. And I was like, Oh, that sounds dope.

James Jay Edwards:

Fear Street. Um, it was his RL Stine's series for older kids. But he also did a bunch of books along the same lines that were not in the Fear Street series. But they were I mean, RL Stine would pump out a book a week, I feel because yeah, he would do a Goosebumps book and a Fear Street book every month. And then he had had these little standalone ones. So and then I guess, maybe he take a week off a month? I don't know. But he was pumping them out in the 90s. Yeah, absolutely. And, you know, like I said, a lot of the Goosebumps books were the same, you just trans..., you know, just put, you know, put a different monster in it. And they were pretty formulaic. Yeah, absolutely. But hey, I mean, it's it probably bought that dude, several houses. So he did something right. Um, but the Fear Street books I never really got too into those. But you know what I was into at the same time, there was Christopher Pike. Do you guys remember Christopher Pike from

Jonathan Correia:

Star Trek right? First captain.

James Jay Edwards:

It's a different author who was probably the referral science Listen to this. He's probably going to be like fuck you for bringing up Christopher Pike. He was probably his biggest competition for that older market. Not so much the Goosebumps, but the Fear Street books, because Christopher Pike's books, I thought they were a little more creative. And they were they were actually scarier I thought, but it was the same general thing were you you know, they were geared towards like probably, you know, mid teenagers and that's what the characters in them were as well. You know, you just like Fear Street you know that. That's what I think was relatable to teenagers is RL Stine anchors for Pike. RL Stine might have been a little bit better at it though. Got into the actually got into the heads of the teenagers so he wrote pretty realistic kids.

Jacob Davidson:

I just love too how people are you know, people forget like the the Goosebumps books in the franchise were so big at the time that there were so many imitators, even from existing franchises like, I was a big fan of Galaxy of... the Galaxy of Fear books from Star Wars where they did you know, kind of YA scary stories set in Star Wars of all things

Jonathan Correia:

which that needs an adaptation.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh god. Yes. I wish.

Jonathan Correia:

I want to Fear Street style Star Wars saga.

Jacob Davidson:

That'd be fun.

James Jay Edwards:

You think Disney hasn't thought of that? It's probably in development. They're doing everything else.

Jacob Davidson:

It's possible.

James Jay Edwards:

There's actually a Christopher Pike book that's in development right now. I think Mike Flanagan is attached to direct, The Midnight Club.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. I heard a little bit about Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, that's a Christopher Pike joint. So I don't know. I want to say it might be for Hulu. But that might be wrong. It might be for someone completely different.

Jonathan Correia:

If it's Flanagan It's probably with Netflix because they've been all right. And then he's doing another adaptation as well for them. That I can't remember.

James Jay Edwards:

Is it another Hill House?

Jonathan Correia:

I wish Oh, my God. I loved Haunting of Hill House. Or no. Bly Manor. Hill House was really good. But Bly Manor was perfectly splendid. So yeah, I mean, I think the

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, the Midnight Club is Netflix. I just Christopher Pike adaptation is going to be for Netflix, but he's definitely doing an adaptation of Something is Killing the Children for Netflix. I just looked it up. So you're right.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

they're not gonna let Flanagan go anywhere else. It's like a goose that lays the golden egg for them.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, pretty much. I mean, if you if you ran us a service and you had Mike Flanagan, would you let him go ever? I mean, come on.

James Jay Edwards:

I give him blank checks. Make whatever movie you want.

Jonathan Correia:

I would just be like, keep making "Haunting Of..." series. Please do more Bly Manor.

James Jay Edwards:

Hey, he was able to film Gerald's Game he can, whatever the hell he wants. Because that's an unfilmable book.

Jonathan Correia:

He made Doctor Sleep make sense. And

James Jay Edwards:

Stephen King has got to love him.

Jacob Davidson:

I bet he does. Yeah, just kind of thinking back. I think probably my favorite Goosebumps book was the Scarecrow Stalks at Midnight. That one scared the hell out of me when I was a kid. Still have my book, too.

James Jay Edwards:

I think my favorite was called You Can't Scare Me. And it was it was kind of like bog muck mud monsters

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah the muck monster

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, the muck monsters. They were the they were the villain. But they didn't come out until later because the whole thing is about kids trying to scare each other. Until finally the monster's real. And everybody's like, Oh, look at a great costume

Jonathan Correia:

that twist for me it's it's always The Mask. I mean,

Jacob Davidson:

oh yeah. The Mask, iconic.

Jonathan Correia:

that that cover alone got me and then the first the first episode you know, because there was two stories in the in the show. The first one was terrified terrified me as a kid. The second one was way too cheesy. Even as a kid I was like, Oh, that's not scary anymore. Those and Monsterland where were my two

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, One Day At, was it One Day at Monsterland or Horrorland

Jacob Davidson:

Or, no it was Horrorland. Horrorland

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, both the books and those episodes were gold for me.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, let's see other thing too. Like, I really do want to revisit the Goosebumps TV show because I recall that all pretty much every episode had an ample amount of practical effects and like monster effects and stuff. So I think that'd be kind of funny. fun to kind of check that out again,

Jonathan Correia:

they did. But they had that 90s Canadian TV production budget. So like it is all it is all practical, but it's it's it's got that nice 90s nostalgia with it, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

but it was also it was a Saturday morning show too. So it wasn't like I mean, there are no axes in heads or anything because oh, no, this was, you know, I'm actually a little confused that Correia's friend's parents wouldn't let him watch it because it was pretty tame. You know, it was a Saturday morning show.

Jacob Davidson:

It was controversial back then.

Jonathan Correia:

He had a helicopter mom so you know, let them really do a lot but that but that was also the thing about that I thought was always so successful about the books and the show was the fact that they weren't going for the bloody kills and stuff like that. So a lot of like the Fears were like, I was surprised I did it a few years back when Goosebumps the TV show first hit Netflix. I did a list for iHorror and I watched the entire series again. And I was genuinely surprised on how much of that show was preying on fears of like losing one selfs like identity. And just preying on like insecurities and stuff like that which are very universal and are still you know, I gets a little bogged down with the cheese of the effects and you know, the writing that's more geared towards younger audience but I mean, the, the, those things are still universal. So like it is still very effective. Like I remember there's an episode that involves mirror people, and

Jacob Davidson:

Oh the mirror people and like they turned invisible

Jonathan Correia:

that's still, that... I was watching that in my 20s having a beer, I was still genuinely creeped out by that. Because like that's, that's, that's a creepy thing. Like, it's not a dog with glowing eyes. Like, that's the thing that's like, Whoa, yeah, that would fuck with my head hard. And then like, I'm looking at my mirror being like, I don't know. I can't wait to see what the team behind these Feer Street movies do next, because they did such a phenomenal job of not only knowing what they were taking the inspur their inspirations from but also not falling for a lot of the faults of that time. Like I said, well rounded characters. Great, you know, but still trying to do one up kills and stuff like,

James Jay Edwards:

see, that's the thing. They didn't really take any stories from the Fear Street series, but they captured the vibe of the whole thing. Oh, so. So it wasn't some I mean, it was I mean, I know RL Stine got a writing credit was more like an inspired by things. Have you guys seen the directors lead yet? Janiak or Janiak? Have you seen Honeymoon? Her first movie?

Jacob Davidson:

No, I still haven't seen that.

James Jay Edwards:

That's with Rose Leslie, and I forget who the guy is in it. It's basically about a newly married couple who goes on their honeymoon. And the woman starts acting like really crazy. It's a pretty freaky movie

Jonathan Correia:

What's it called? Again? Honeymoon.

James Jay Edwards:

It's just called Honeymoon. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. Check that out.

James Jay Edwards:

It's like maybe maybe five or six years old.

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah. interested in seeing what she does next. And yeah, no, I, I gotta say that. I do appreciate that they went so hard with the Fear Street book adaptations, because, yeah, that is, you know, cuz it's kind of gateway horror, but at the same time, it is gorier than most R rated movies nowadays. Yeah, it

James Jay Edwards:

earns the R. Oh, seriously. So I mean, it and even even some of the sex I mean, there's no nudity. But it starts going on, you know, some of the some of the groping and touchy feely and you're like it's pretty heavy. You're like, okay, there are Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

like, like you said, No nudity. But there's there's they're pretty graphic like

Jacob Davidson:

that does get intense. They're going for it. Yeah. Right.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, damn horny teenagers,

Jonathan Correia:

or any teenagers, or any teenagers do, which is generally each other.

Jacob Davidson:

Yep. And again, I just love the different, the different slashers that they have for these stories, like, yeah, there's the bag head axe man for the summer camp. There's also like that weird kid with like, the creepy doll head and

James Jay Edwards:

the weird witch is just the one that's just like a teenage girl, but it's like the witch. And then there's this. Yeah. And then there's the skull head.

Jonathan Correia:

And then there's that one guy with a leather with a leather helmet or like head thing that's drowning someone in the lake. And then there's that there's that one guy that stabbed the shit out of this sister or stabbed the shit out. So one of the sisters in the second one that has like a burnt up face and stuff. It's just like, what's his story? Each one of them like, you look at them, and you're like, there's a complete story to that character that we're never going to see. And I'm a bit upset of it,

James Jay Edwards:

you do get to see the origin of the bag head axe guy, right? In 78 which is you do cuz cuz he's probably the most horrifying one of those.

Jonathan Correia:

And you do get to see you do get to see some of the stories for someone because there's also rose, the one who murdered seven people and then killed herself and she's the one that sings a song. Like, so you do get to see him for some of it. But there's others where they're like, you're just like, Damn, that character could have their own movie. And they're just like, they're just as secondary. You know? What is up with that doll head one with the bat though like that? That little fucker. Like, every time it comes on, it's just like, what I can't help but think like, What's your deal? Like? What?

James Jay Edwards:

There's a couple more movies we could do like a 1983 and 1965 we

Jonathan Correia:

we joke but they could honestly do like a like a series of like just 20 minute like things and just go through each one of the shady Shadyside killers and just like show like what they did just and they just call it the Further Adventures of the Witches Influence or some shit.

James Jay Edwards:

There you go. If you're listening, Lee, make it happen.

Jacob Davidson:

it's what the people demand

Jonathan Correia:

mine that well dry. Like I'm down for far more Fear Streets and I can't wait for 1666 but I am going to wait a little bit, because I did promise Lindsey that even though I'm on the road, we're going to try to stream in at the same time. Different places, because we're cute like that.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, oh, on that cute note. Let's get the hell out of here.

Jonathan Correia:

Let's go to bed.

James Jay Edwards:

So, yeah, our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So go check them out. Our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go check him out. You can check us out at the Eye On Horror Facebook page, the Eye On Horror, Twitter, the Eye On Horror, Instagram, at ihorror.com and any other number of places. We're not hard to get ahold of. So you can you can find us yeah, hit hit us up on any of the socials and let us know what are your favorite Fear Street books, Goosebumps books,

Jonathan Correia:

TV episodes,

James Jay Edwards:

or Christopher Pike books. Let us know what your favorite of these teeny horror series or books or whatever. And we will see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison

Jonathan Correia:

and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Werewolves Within Reviews
The Forever Purge Reviews
Black Widow Reviews
Gunpowder Milkshake
Tales of the Uncanny and Anthologies
Creep Tales, and Shakes The Clown Ruining Childhoods
A Rep At Kino Lorber Hates Sleepaway Camp 3, Like a Lot
Only James (the guy who always brings up The Butterfly Effect when talking about time travel movies) Saw Tomorrow War
Fear Street begins!
Killing all the kids
Fier Street
These ain't John Hughes teens
The impressionable R.L. Stine
Christopher Pike (Not Star Trek)
Mike Flanagan is Perfectly Splended
Fave Goosebumps books
Janiak's Honeymoon
Damn Horny Teenagers
Further Adventures of the Witches Influence or some shit
Time for Bed