Eye On Horror

The Many Talents of Ama Lea

July 04, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 12
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

The guys welcome filmmaker, photographer, fashion designer, and magazine editer Ama Lea to talk about everything from The Monster Squad and The Slumber Party Massacre to David Cronenberg and Slushies.

Eye on Horror: Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Correia: Twitter / Instagram

Jacob: Twitter / Instagram

Jay: Twitter / Instagram

Ama Lea: Twitter / Instagram / Website (Poltergeists and Paramours)

iHorror: Facebook / Twitter / Instagram / Website

Mascot Loomis: Instagram

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror The official podcast of iHorror calm This is Episode 69 otherwise known as season four Episode 12 I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me yet again is your other host Jacob Davison How you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing well as always and happy to be here

James Jay Edwards:

cool. And also with me yet again is your other other hosts John Correia How you doing Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

doing pretty good, you know, bright and early as usual.

James Jay Edwards:

It's it's a little brighter, but not as early as usual. But here we are. We've also got a special guest this episode and we're gonna bring her on right now. This is Ama Lea. I say that right?

Ama Lea:

Yeah, you did. You got it. Right. First try!

James Jay Edwards:

I even checked earlier, but I'm still like second guessing myself. I she is a artist, photographer, writer, director, entrepreneur, a little bit of everything. We have a renaissance woman here. How you doing?

Ama Lea:

I'm good. How are you guys doing?

Jacob Davidson:

Great. Good. So happy to have you on the show. Yeah,

Ama Lea:

happy to be here, guys. Thanks for having me.

James Jay Edwards:

In the interest of full disclosure, we are recording this. About three weeks in advance because of scheduling issues. We had to do a twofer today. So if something happens in the next three weeks, and we don't bring it up, it's because we don't know about it yet, because we haven't looked into our crystal balls yet this morning. But anyway, so what's been going on you guys since the last hour since the last time?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I was gonna add I'm going to see the movie Censor tonight at the Alamo Drafthouse, which I'd actually already seen on the Sundance Virtual Fest, which was one of my favorites. It's a brilliant, brilliant movie. It's basically set during the video nasties Thatcher era UK, and it's about this censor woman who becomes obsessed with like a particular movie because it kind of relates to something that happened to her in her life. And it was the directorial debut of Prano Bailey-Bond. And, like, I hope to see more of her because this was just a perfect blend of kind of like, dark comedy, meta commentary, outright horror kind of homage to video nasties. It was a lot of fun. And that's the thing. Like I loved it so much on the virtual fast. I had to see it on the big screen. So excited to experience that tonight.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, she actually had made a short film called Nasty. Probably around 2016. That was this movie is based off from that we had done like a length of festival circuit around the same time. And it was brilliant. And I thought Censor was it blew me away. It is like next level art.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. No. And now I got to find that short. Maybe they'll include on the blu ray or home video release.

Ama Lea:

It should be out there. It was. It was part of the theory, a festival here in LA.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, speaking of that's coming up. Yeah, the 25th Yeah, and it's gonna be on Shudder. Like streaming for there. Yeah, I always love a theory, it's too bad. It won't be in an actual theater this year. But on the plus side, you know, everybody will be able to experience it through Sudder.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Which is really cool. Because I know a lot of festivals, you know, last year a lot of them adapted to the virtual world of quarantine and all that. But it sounds like a lot of them aren't fully aren't embracing it for future fests cuz I think doing a hybrid of doing in theater, but also doing virtual, not only gets more exposure, but it opens it up to more people who either can't make it physically to a theater, to the theater where all these are showing, but also who might not be able to afford to go see all these movies in a theater. I really love that aspect of the virtual festivals that were happening a lot, you know, is that it made it more open to everybody. You know,

Jacob Davidson:

I'm with you. Like, like I said, You know, I was able to see Censor, virtually through Sundance, and if it had been just at Sundance, I would not have been able to see it. So I really hope that they keep up a kind of hybrid model that allows more people around the world to watch these movies on the festival circuit.

James Jay Edwards:

And I hope they develop their Roku and fire stick apps because watching movies on a computer screen, unless it's Host

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's why I got like one of those FireWire things that connects your laptop to your TV or HDMI, FireWire things.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, you can go you can go HDMI, but yeah, it's just so much easier to to do that's that's what we're Talk about last time, how I watched What Happens Next Will Scare You for the Cinemadness thing. And the beauty of that one was when you clicked on the link at cinamadness, it took you to a YouTube Live event, and the YouTube Live event can play on my Roku. So I got to watch that on my TV.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and also Chattanooga Film Festival be coming up, and I'm going to be covering that. And that was the first festival to do it virtually last year, and they became the trendsetter. And I'm really glad that it kickstarted it because like they had an incredible lineup last year, they have an incredible lineup this year. And like I said, I hope it keeps up.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, those ones are good, because not everyone can get to Chattanooga. Yeah, so I mean, in that case, and also like TIFF I know has been gone virtual, which is good. Because you know, and like Sundance, you know, if you can't get to Park City, or you can't get to Toronto, hey, you're not left out?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And Ama, as somebody who's as you were talking about who's entered projects into film festivals, how do you feel about virtual festivals versus in person or hybrid?

Unknown:

Um, I personally think it's great, because it feels like I'm getting more bang for my buck, like, you know, the admission to the submission fee for any festival ranges from like, you know, 50 to $1,000 per festival. Yeah, like anywhere in that range. And then and, you know, obviously, filmmakers or production companies are submitting too many. And, you know, when you're only filling a theater of 300 people, that's, that's the amount of eyes You're going to get on your movie. But if it's like if they're doing it virtually as well, that really expands the audience and gets more people to watch it that wouldn't get the chance otherwise.

James Jay Edwards:

Now, in these festivals, when they do them virtually, do they expand the audience? Or do they only let 300 people into the virtual screening? Do they open it up to a ton of people like that?

Ama Lea:

I think so. I think at least as far as I, the only one I really know much about is Sundance and I think they were like doing several several 1000 people per film, right?

James Jay Edwards:

I know, it seemed like the press credentials were a little easier to get. So maybe they did open it, you know, cuz you're, like you said you don't have a physical limitation. It's all up to you, however many servers you want to kick on, to stream it. So yeah, I mean, it makes sense that they would, that they would open it up, we're

Unknown:

still paying for it, you know, so more money for them. More viewership for filmmakers. I honestly think they should keep it going. Pandemic or no.

James Jay Edwards:

I think there's a lot of things that people have learned over the pandemic, you know, like, you know, they say this meeting could have been an email 90% of people's business. My I mean, my business, we, we gave up my day job, we gave up our office, and we're all working from home now. We're like, hey, what, you know, we kind of need to have a space for certain things. You know, it's good to have a conference room for clients. But for the most part, you know, we're all working from home now.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, my partner went home as well. He went from an office in Beverly Hills to his boss be like, okay, all the editors work from home. Now, we don't need to rent this, like, huge space. Like, why are we wasting all this money?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, pre production from home has been so nice, just being able to have that break. Because, you know, sometimes during pre production, you're either extremely busy or it's slow. And it's always weird just sitting there in the office and you're like, well, if I watch Netflix, you know, everyone's gonna know that I have nothing to do and then they're gonna make me do other stuff. But not saying that it's good. It's great for slacking but it's nice to like, not be on that edge all day, you know, you're still available, but you can still like take your time with lunch and be I feel more productive, at least during pre production. definitely miss being on set, though. So it's always nice being on it. Unless you're CCO then it's stress.

James Jay Edwards:

I have my dog right next to me, he entire time I'm working, which is good because he was a puppy and he needed constant supervision. But you know, I usually have like, you know, friends or the office on and as background noise. I love working from home. You know, and the kind of work I do. It can be done from home, so hey, loving it.

Jonathan Correia:

Now, I gotta I gotta say, I didn't say it in the last episode, but I know Jacob, you watched Johnny Mnemonic for the first time not too long ago.

Ama Lea:

Wow.

Jacob Davidson:

That's how I started 2021 because it said in 2021 it was the first movie I watched January 1.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, I was working my overnight the other night and I went you know what I need to watch Johnny Mnemonic after Jacobs description actually ended up having a Johnny double feature. I watched that and Walter Hill's Johnny Handsome,

James Jay Edwards:

but you didn't keep it going for Johnny Dangerously, which makes me sad.

Jonathan Correia:

No. Unfortunately, I unfortunately I followed it up with Walter Hill's The Assignment which is a very weird and misguided film. But Johnny Henson was pretty entertaining. But even more entertaining, Johnny Mnemonic you did not undersell the weirdness and the craziness of that film because it was basically like, computers were becoming a thing in the mid 90s. And Sony was like, we want to make our the first cyberpunk movie, having no idea what that was and they just let the filmmakers do anything. And they did. I mean, what was it? They had Dolph Lundgren as like a mercenary

Jacob Davidson:

Cyborg Jesus Christ? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Who like would murder people but like

Jacob Davidson:

with us with a cross sword like a sword

Jonathan Correia:

that was also across? Oh, yeah, it was like Dina Mayer's first movie cuz she went on to do Starship Troopers and a bunch of other classics, Udo Kier just you know, popping up to say hi and be awesome. Like,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, what like what a cast because he also got Henry Rollins is like a renegade doctor and you got Ice-T is a leader of revolutionaries.

Jonathan Correia:

And then that was probably Henry Rollins worst acting like

Ama Lea:

Oh, come on.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, I mean, he's done some really good, you know, roll and whatnot. But like,

James Jay Edwards:

isn't he usually playing himself though?

Jacob Davidson:

No, he's done some acting roles,

James Jay Edwards:

like in Wrong Turn 2 he was basically Henry Rollins.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, I mean, yeah, that's Wrong Turn 2 though. But I mean, like, he did that vampire movie that was, uh, that he, you know, hit some really good deep notes. But like, Johnny Mnemonic, he was so wooden in that and but it was perfect for it. I mean,

Ama Lea:

he's just like, it's machines like this. This

James Jay Edwards:

was that his first acting gig? No, I mean, aside from music videos, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I think it was one of them.

Unknown:

I feel like he had one more. Didn't he have one movie before? Johnny Mnemonic? Um, maybe not. Maybe that was his first.

Jonathan Correia:

If it was it was probably like random punk in the backseat or something like that. Like I'm I'm surprised he wasn't in a Penelope Spheeris film beforehand or something like that?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I like I've looking on Letterbox and it's got like a listing for like 100 movies

James Jay Edwards:

now are these movies are these him also like

Jacob Davidson:

documentaries and stuff where he plays himself so you know it's a

James Jay Edwards:

appearances on talk shows as himself. Is that like IMDb lists those?

Jacob Davidson:

I think it depends but yeah, like a lot like a lot of his early stuff is urban struggled the battle at the Cuckoo's Nest.

Ama Lea:

Bad Boys 2

Jacob Davidson:

the slug movie. Yeah, Bad Boys 2 is on here. Let's see he was in The Chase with Charlie Sheen in 1994

Ama Lea:

that's the one I was thinking of.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say Speed but it is The Chase. Is that the one that the Chili Peppers are in as well. I think I think Anthony Kiedis and Flea are in are in it as well. And they and they play a couple rednecks who wreck their truck.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, yeah, they're and so's Ray Wise and Cary Elwes and Kristy Swanson. Well,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, everyone knows how great Anthony Kiedis after his performance in Point Break, you know?

Ama Lea:

Gosh

Jonathan Correia:

but yeah, Johnny Mnemonic that's such a weird and fascinating film. And I was thinking all of that even before the dolphins came into the picture, because that was just like icing on the cake, which I'm like this Okay, I'm starting to understand what this world's trying to doing. And then all sudden, no, you know, psychic dolphins it's like, Oh, okay. We're going there

Jacob Davidson:

It's a wild movie. It but it but it is fun. I know. It's like wildly panned and and was horribly reviewed when it first came out. But it is worth a second viewing. I think it it has aged weirdly well, like in a very entertaining way. And the graphics in it are just gorgeous.

James Jay Edwards:

Gorgeous, like really or gorgeous in like a Hackers kind of way.

Ama Lea:

Like Lawnmower Man.

Jonathan Correia:

Like Lawnmower Man to Jobe's War, which is the second time we've referenced that movie today. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

but two different episodes. So

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, spreading out our love for Matt Frewer

Jonathan Correia:

Is Lawnmower Man 2's Jobe's War about to become our new Rampage where we just mentioned it every episode.

Jacob Davidson:

I hope not.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's sit let's start talking about Ama. A question I always like to ask our guests is kind of just the or how they got started. You kind of do it all. So let me ask you this. How did your love for horror get started? What are the what are your first memories of being of the genre?

Ama Lea:

Um, wow. Okay. My first memory I guess is my grandparents used to babysit me all the time when I was really young. And they would let me go to the video store like mom and pop, you know, VHS shop that also sold like pizza and chicken and cat food. And I remember being like four or five years old and wanting Monster Squad. Yeah, they rented it for me. And I watched I rented that movie. So many times that the owners of the store just gave the adjust to my grandparents or like she's she's she's bought it just let her have it

James Jay Edwards:

and no one else ever rents it.

Ama Lea:

Like, you know, this was like in the late 80s, early 90s like it Yeah, no one else watched it. And I watched it. I watched it so many times. It was like my favorite movie when I was a kid. And I even like I was like first grade and I got in trouble for doing like, Monster Squad fanfiction in my class. So that was my level my gateway. Yeah, you didn't remember? I mean, I think we're probably all around the same age. Like do you have those books that you had to make in school where you like, Drew or wrote pictures and they put them in like, like a wallpaper cover with like a spiral? Yeah, how

James Jay Edwards:

did you get in trouble? Did your teacher not like it? Or

Ama Lea:

no, cuz I like I pretty much just like drew out like storyboard Monster Squad and put it in one of those books.

James Jay Edwards:

So you plagiarize.

Ama Lea:

I plagiarized, yes plagiarize like it was just me drawing out scenes of Monster Squad. And, you know, I don't think that they liked Wolf Man got nards in first grade.

Jonathan Correia:

Or the teacher looks like a cat. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

What grade is this?

Ama Lea:

This was first grade

James Jay Edwards:

Wolfman got nards in the first grade.

Jacob Davidson:

Nards is a fourth grade level thing.

Jonathan Correia:

I for a moment, I was like, they were mad about the plagiarism? Like they were like, Ah, man, we know Monster Squad really well.

Ama Lea:

They were specifically mad about a pilot getting eaten by Dracula. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

that's inappropriate for first graders, I guess.

Ama Lea:

Yeah. So Monster Squad was my horror gateway drug.

Jonathan Correia:

What? What a gateway film to get into a Monster Squad is so dear to my heart.

Ama Lea:

It truly is. It'll always be a favorite.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm sure it was the inspiration for a lot of horror fans.

Ama Lea:

At least it was like, you know, like for now in their mid to late 30s. Like I think we all grew up with those kinds of movies like The Gate and Monster Squad and even like The Goonies and all that sort of horror movie, but it definitely was like a childhood favorite.

James Jay Edwards:

We have a very loose definition of horror. So yeah, you we can say Goonies Gremlins, any of that. You're cool with us.

Jonathan Correia:

James is the fringe horror guy. So yeah, whenever he does his top 10 lists, everyone gets mad at him, because they're like that's not horror

James Jay Edwards:

people got mad at me for putting The Hateful Eight on it. I'm like, Well, have you watched the last 20 minutes?

Ama Lea:

Yeah, it's pretty brutal

James Jay Edwards:

episode of Tales from the Crypt.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. Now, you, you talked a bit about film festivals earlier. And that's because you are a filmmaker you direct. You've written some of the things that you have directed. What kind of got you into doing that? And especially short films, you know,

Ama Lea:

um, I mean, I guess I get, that's like another childhood story. But you know, I used to watch movies all the time when I was a kid, like, and I remember, you know, just renting things by what the covers look like, right? I'm sure we've all done that. Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. And I'd rented Slumber Party Massacre. And when I put it on, I think I was like, probably like 14 and I saw a woman's name as the director, you know, Amy Holden Jones. And I was just like, holy shit, I could do this. Like, I'm allowed to do this too. And I started making like, you know, camcorder like, videos in the backyard with my family and friends and like editing them between two VCR. So, you know, I definitely wanted to make movies since I was a kid. That was always the dream.

James Jay Edwards:

Did you use an actual lizard on a matchbox car ever do any of that?

Ama Lea:

No, I grew up in Maine, no lizards.

James Jay Edwards:

We were joking about that a couple episodes ago, the giant Gila monster, where they basically took like a real Gila monster and made like Matchbox cars or model trains. And I was watching a documentary about Bret the Hitman Hart, about a week ago, and he used to make movies in his backyard, and he would do that he would take his pet lizard on a model car, and it showed some of his footage was Anyway, I'm going off on a tangent, but uh,

Ama Lea:

I think we all did stuff like I two German Shepherds when I was growing up, and I always made them wolves in my movie, like, Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

that's so heartwarming that Slumber Party Massacre can be such an inspiration because it's such a brilliant film. And yeah, it's so good.

James Jay Edwards:

We've discussed this like, kind of like a lot, but the fact that Amy Holden Jones made basically a satire of the slasher movie that was embraced by fans of the slasher movie, you're like, Okay, you people are either getting the joke too well, or you're missing it completely.

Ama Lea:

Right? It's like, dudes who love Beavis and Butthead? Like you know they're making fun of you right?

Jacob Davidson:

And that the entire franchise has been exclusively directed by women. Two and Three.

James Jay Edwards:

It would be weird to give a Slumber Party Massacre movie to a man though at this point. I mean, I think I think at any point they they couldn't have given that to a man.

Ama Lea:

Oh, I would burn some shit down like

Jacob Davidson:

and you'd be justified.

Jonathan Correia:

Absolute riot. but yeah you you have a lot of awesome shorts death I always mispronounce is when Deathcember. Right. Terror from 20,000 Leagues Below and one of you were one of the finalists on ABCs of Death 2.5 as well. And for Mermaid, right?

James Jay Edwards:

Well M is for Mermaid, for the second ABCs of death, they always would solicit, you know, fan submissions, and the first one it was T and it was letter M for the second. So was that what this was? Did you set out to make a submission for this? Or was it a short film you already had strewn around your mind? You're like, oh, it just happens to fit in with them.

Ama Lea:

No, I definitely did it to to submit for it. And we had no money. So we ended up don't get I hope I don't get sued for this. We we looked on websites for a certain area of California that has lots of water, a lake that might be an animal shape. And we looked for cabins on the website that weren't rented the day that we wanted to shoot. So then we just went and use the dock of the house that we knew was going to be empty. No, we just like guerilla shot it

James Jay Edwards:

that's how you do it.

Jonathan Correia:

That's some brilliant Larry Cohen filmmaking I mean, that dude stole shots all the time.

Ama Lea:

We stole most of that short film and then me and the girl who started it, Emma, we she lived next to like pretty much like a frat house full of dudes. And we flirted with them to use their pool. I like we didn't tell them we're gonna fill it full of blood. And, you know, like fish guts. So we left like, yeah, we left it. And it was like, just purple. Thanks, bye.

Jacob Davidson:

Whatever works. And I consider myself lucky. I've seen a couple of your short films play at the Egyptian and Aero. Like, I love that they screwed like I think it was before Exorcist 3 around, because you know, it was around Christmas time they played five deaths and blood red. That was a lot of fun. That was so cool.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, excited to see it. You know, at the Aero.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that was a good time. And from hell, she rises. I can't remember exactly where I saw, but I did see it on the big screen. So yeah, that was it. And it's all it's always been great. Watching your stuff. play in the theater like that. Thank you.

James Jay Edwards:

Going back to M for Mermaid though for a second. Um, it didn't get the green light for the actual ABCs of Death 2. But I guess they got so many quality submissions that they did ABCs of death 2.5 which is basically a bunch of M is for blank. And it got on there. So you were definitely one of the better applicants for that. Because it how many are in 2.5? You know, think it's 26 are there?

Ama Lea:

So honestly, I've never I've never seen it. But yeah, you know, it is 26 I it's one of the few things I still get like a check for every once in a while.

James Jay Edwards:

That's good. They, they cut you in on it. So you got you got to when I bought it on VUDU, you got a piece of that. So I'm happy to Oh, thank you that went to you.

Ama Lea:

Um, yeah, it was it was cool. You know, I was, I wasn't like, you know, totally heartbroken. I knew that. Like, there was very slim chances of getting that one spot and of like, you know, four or 5000 people who ever said it was a lot that submitted. And they also had a lot more money than us. So I was like, I don't think we'll get it. But it'd be really cool. If we did and then, you know, I'd gotten hit up probably about the same day that they announced the winner and they're like, don't get bummed, don't say anything. Can't tell you why. And then like a week or two later, they're like, Oh, yeah, we're gonna, we want to do this and release all these. So it was cool.

James Jay Edwards:

I always give any respect to anybody who can finish a movie of any kind. So the fact that you got it made is cool. Plus, it looks really good. I mean that the mermaid effects are pretty awesome. Just the fact that you made your movie is is a huge respect there.

Ama Lea:

It's always a it's an effort, no matter what, no matter how it turns out, at least it's done, you know?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And that's and that's why we don't like to punch down on movies that maybe we didn't vibe with as much you know, because we understand it takes so much blood sweat and tears to make get it done. So

Ama Lea:

you know what filmmaking is like? When you think about it. Like before you start our project, you're like thinking of all like the artistic things you're going to do. I like you're so excited for that. But filmmaking isn't as much art as it is problem solving. Just trying to get through something because there's never enough time. There's never enough money, something's missing. You need this, you need that you can't afford it, whatever. It's always something and just getting it done. I'll always applaud anyone who does because it's, it's a bitch

James Jay Edwards:

so many of those ABCs of death shorts on any of them. I mean, I don't want to say they're bad, but they're from a story standpoint, they don't have a beginning, a middle and an end. And that's probably the best thing about M is for Mermain for me, I think there's a definite beginning, middle and end. I remember in the first one, I think it was um, and it's M is for Miscarriage, Ty West's?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah

James Jay Edwards:

that one I will say is bad. It's just like, it's so pointless. And I heard and I heard him say somewhere He's like, Oh, no, I just went out. And I crapped that out real quick. It's like, Oh, you know, we can tell? It's like, Yeah, I

Jacob Davidson:

was like, what, like, 30 seconds,

Ama Lea:

you don't have an ego like Ty West.

Jonathan Correia:

Now, one of the big projects that you do now is Poltergeists and Paramours, your clothing line, and webstore. You do awesome work there. I know. Because Jacob was the one that introduced us to it. And I have so many questions when it comes to that. But one of the things I super want to highlight is the fact that it's all horror inspired. But you do a lot of leisure wear and active wear for women because there's not a whole lot of we always talk about Cavity Colors and Fright Rags, and they do make like women's size clothing, and stuff like that. But no one's not a lot of people are making a lot of specific, exactly, you know, leisure wear active wear. So what was it was a huge inspiration behind, or big inspiration behind that for starting it and getting that going.

Ama Lea:

Um, honestly, it was just because those were things that I wanted. And I couldn't find, I grew up with, like, my, a lot of the women in my family were seamstresses. And I learned how to sew when I was young. And, you know, I always really wanted to do something fashion related. And I didn't know how I didn't really have like, any specific aspiration to do it until a friend of mine had bought me like a sewing machine for my birthday a few years ago. And I just learned on YouTube, how to make lingerie and activewear. And just kept doing it. And you know, it kept growing and growing and growing. And now it's sort of like, I tried to create things like a space in horror that hasn't really, how do I say, this is like a nice way that doesn't say, like, I'm throwing anyone under the bus. Like, I love Fright Rags, I love Cavity Colors. I love all of the dudes out there who are killing it. And I buy their stuff all the time. But there's gaps in the fandom of like, it's like they're not really choosing movies to license that women or the LGBTQ community love. And that's some that's a space I really, really wanted to fill. So that's that's sort of the direction of what I'm going for with my company.

Jacob Davidson:

And I had to give you a big kudos because you were also I feel like you were that you were one of the first to do horror theme face masks during the pandemic. And you were one of the first groups that I bought, or one of the first companies I bought theme face masks from and how I got, I think, like five from you. And I would get a lot of compliments on them. And I would refer people to your website, and I hope more people got them.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, the face masks were crazy. I never, you know, it's like you wake up one day, and instead of getting ready to go direct to feature, the world is closed down. And there's like, what am I gonna do for the next year of my life? So I just went through my drawers and started finding like cotton fabric. And I think I donated like four or 5000 of them in the first few months. And then after that, it was just like, Well, I have a tons of horror fabric. I'm just going to keep making them for people. And you know, it really went from there. I'm still making them for people.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I'm still buying them.

James Jay Edwards:

How many masks Have you made in total?

Ama Lea:

Oh my god, I'm at a guess. Probably around 10,000.

Jacob Davidson:

Wow, how

James Jay Edwards:

long does it take you to make each one?

Ama Lea:

Um, I mean, I could do it in like an assembly line. I I could make a single mask in about three or four minutes. Oh, I've done it down. At this point. I could do it in my sleep.

Jonathan Correia:

After the first few 1000 you get into a rhythm.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, I feel like until about like June last year, I was really working like 16 hour days because you know, as I said I was donating a lot of them and there's so many places in need like hospitals. The local morgues in LA couldn't get their hands on them like I saw. Wow. You know, there's a lot of spooky morticians in LA.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say you've got morgue workers walk around with universal monsters masks.

Ama Lea:

Pretty much. Yeah. Like it's all I've done. I'm sorry.

Jonathan Correia:

such perfect like, yes more more people need spooky masks and, and there's they're such cool designs but one that especially jumps out to me is your Midsommar one. That is absolutely gorgeous looking. It is such cool, intricate and it looks like it would be a mask that one of the that they would wear. And in the movie you're what would you hand embroidered over them? Or is it embroidered? I'm sorry? I don't know.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, it's embroidery. It's Yeah, each one of those is like, it's it's a project, it's the entire mask is covered in like, like Midsommar embroidery designs. And yeah, those I'm so glad I'm not making any more of those.

Jonathan Correia:

labor of love.

Ama Lea:

It was like, every time I finish what I was like, This is so beautiful. And then I had to start another month. I don't want to do this.

Jonathan Correia:

But yes what you were saying, licensing, you know, once projects or titles that aren't normally picked up by others. One of the first ones that stuck out to me is you made Halloween shirts for Team Deborah Hill, which is absolutely awesome. Deborah, who is one of my inspirations and so whenever someone goes, Oh, why do you want to do film? Like it's because of Deborah Hill's work, you know, she was so incredible. But what what is a lot of the process that comes to licensing with that, because I know you also I know cuz I bought a lot of them just did a big Phantom of the Paradise line is so is it? Is there a big? What's the process for licensing titles like that?

Ama Lea:

Um, I don't, I don't actually do it there I hire someone who does it. So I don't have really specific details there. But it's, it's very different. I you know, I'm still learning the process too. But it's very different from company to company. And honestly, like there'll be there's things you can get around, you know, licensing wise, like you can do just unofficially, to not have to go through them. But, you know, obviously, the more above the board you are the better So, but it's it's different all over the place. Every company is different. You know, some, some people license you out, you can kind of tell you can see the collections on you know, all the major horror companies websites of the movies they have, there's a lot of similarities because those are the easier ones. And then, you know, like there's like Scream who you don't just license it from, you know, the production company. You also had to like license it through the mask, I guess. And that's the whole thing. Isn't that weird? Like, that's

James Jay Edwards:

my screen. Yeah, that's a that's a hard license to get. And I don't know what kind of I don't know if it was overlooked when when Craven made Scream or if somehow they signed a weird rights contract. But yeah, the makers of the mask get a cut out of Scream merch, because you can't have a scream shirt without Ghostface Why me? I guess you can. You could have I mean, I've seen the Courtney Cox, you know, face with the you know that poster, but people want goes face.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, absolutely. But yeah, you had two separate licenses that you have to do. It's crazy.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it's cool. Because especially with Phantom, you did a lot of very screen accurate ones. Like you got Paul Williams vest, you got the death records. vest. So

Ama Lea:

that was that was like hours of just like, like, shot for shot, like going through it and like, like for that vest. Like when I was sketching out that fabric. I seriously had to just keep every frame just keep it moving to see like, you know, details that you can't see from the whole thing like, that was work and I don't know if you guys saw but he like he responded, and I died. I died.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I saw that. Paul Williams complimented your work.

Ama Lea:

I like instantly started crying.

James Jay Edwards:

How much of that Phantom of the Paradise stuff had to be like, I mean, clearly the Phantom of the Paradise step and all that but like, like the juicy fruits. Did you have to license that as well?

Ama Lea:

No, just just the movie title.

Jonathan Correia:

Okay, and I, I have to say I love the detail that you put into the juicy fruits tank because it looks exactly like in the movie except you hid the Phantom in the, in the flowers. That was

Ama Lea:

really I had to give it something a little a little bit more the movie than just plain flowers. like no one's gonna be into that.

Jacob Davidson:

And we also had to get the Phantom of the Paradise shorts, the shorts.

Ama Lea:

So I was like Jacob, you don't want these this short, I'm gonna make you longer ones?

Jonathan Correia:

No, don't tell me that I was so excited that he was getting short shorts.

Jacob Davidson:

Okay, so I'm getting shorts. They're not quite that short.

Jonathan Correia:

No!

Jacob Davidson:

you know

Ama Lea:

no Jacob long enough to know, I was like, there's no way he's gonna he's gonna actually wear these.

Jacob Davidson:

I appreciate that.

James Jay Edwards:

That brings up another question of mine. The stuff that you in the collections how much of that is actually handmade I mean that the T shirts are those bought and screen printed. But stuff like the shorts and the vests that you all hand make

Ama Lea:

it depend those shorts, those shorts are screen printed. So that's through another company, but pretty much everything else the best are all tailored by like me and the people who work for me. All of the women's merchandise, it's all made here. And then the vest, the Yeah, the denim vest. We don't make either but the the fancy ones we do.

Jonathan Correia:

That's and we could see your work. And no one can is a podcast. So obviously there's no visual but we could see your sewing machine in the background

Ama Lea:

Yeah, in my office.

James Jay Edwards:

It would look weird if it wasn't messy. It would look unused. You can tell. You can tell that you're busy back there.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, it's it's gross. I'm sorry.

Jacob Davidson:

Looking inside the factory.

Ama Lea:

Yes, this is my sweatshop.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, but it's awesome. I mean, I knew I had the honor of buying my first crop top from you the maniac design.

Ama Lea:

You wore it so well. Like you were I'm so glad that there are dudes wearing that shirt.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm trying to I'm bringing it back. I'm telling you I want everyone to be dressed like Apollo Creed and Rocky in Rocky 3, you know running on the beach. That that needs to be brought back.

James Jay Edwards:

Correia is the only person on earth who lost weight during the pandemic so he can pull off that crop top.

Jonathan Correia:

I have to stress not at first I did gain weight and then yeah, I November hit and I was like, man, I feel like I have to do something before this. So I mean, it's really easy guys. All you got to do is just radically changed your diet and like be super active and like it's super easy when you're not working. I found that helped me out a lot when you're unemployed just you know, use that free time. No, it's it's terrible advice. But no, it was I did not like dieting. I still know I still do it kind of But enough about my diet.

Jacob Davidson:

And well Ama, do you have any kind of like wishlist titles or franchises that you'd like to do fashion or apparel based off of?

Ama Lea:

Yeah, I think you and I actually talked about a little bit, but obviously I would love to do Mandy, I think

Jacob Davidson:

oh yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

like Jacob would love for you to do Mandy

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I would.

Ama Lea:

Honestly like I just feel like, I feel like this is the most egotistical thing I've ever gonna say in my life. But I feel like I could do Mandy so much better than it's been done so far. Like, I'm like all these Legion M shirts. I want to I want to buy them and put them on my body, but I don't like them.

Jacob Davidson:

No, I mean, like, You're such a huge fan that I can only imagine the designs or like different type of apparel you'd come up with.

Ama Lea:

Oh, I would make those those Jeremiah robes 100% that'd be like my first order of business.

Jacob Davidson:

They do look very leisurely.

Jonathan Correia:

I hope you do get that because I think Jacob how many Mandy shirts are you at? Are you almost at a week's worth? Um,

Jacob Davidson:

no. I think I've got like, well, I've got two Mandy shirts and one cheddar Goblin shirt.

Jonathan Correia:

So you need to have at least four different designs so he can wrap out his week. I'm like that with dinosaur shirts. I have enough mountain t dinosaur shirts that I can go an entire week with mountain tees. They're based out of my hometown in New Hampshire, actually.

Ama Lea:

Oh, really?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that's I used to get free shirts all the time. I had friends that would work there. And the factory rejects they would just give them away. So that's why I own so many,

Ama Lea:

that's so cool. So this is a lot of New England people then, Jacob's from Massachusetts. I'm from Maine. You're from New Hampshire. Yeah, Jay Are you the odd man out?

James Jay Edwards:

I'm San Diego baby. I was born in Long Beach but moved to San Diego when I was like eight months old. So yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And you're now he's just surrounded by New Englanders all the time

Jacob Davidson:

The one So Cal person here.

James Jay Edwards:

I know. And I hate the Bruins and the Patriots.

Jacob Davidson:

Ooh.

Jonathan Correia:

Understandable.

Ama Lea:

As long as you don't talk shit on the Red Sox. You're fine.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I don't really feel passionately about baseball either way, so I'm fine. It same with basketball. The Celtics are cool in my book, too. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

But you'll never experience a Nor'Easter so

Jacob Davidson:

Havin' to park your car in a yard.

James Jay Edwards:

I can't even say Nor'Easter right, I did.

Jacob Davidson:

you sounded like you were saying "the noid"

Jonathan Correia:

Which is Back.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh right, the noid is back.

James Jay Edwards:

I just talked like Mayor Quimby when I say it both would be

Jonathan Correia:

almost there. I really do hope especially after hearing your origin stories, I hope you do a Slumber Party Massacre line sometime soon. And definitely I need more Monster Squad shirts because my Stephen King rules shirt didn't fit me so I cut it up to turn it into a patch.

Ama Lea:

I mean, did you did you see the pink Stephen King Rules shirt that I made?

Jonathan Correia:

I did but I spent too much money on the Phantom and I ran out Well,

Ama Lea:

I didn't actually release it. I just designed it. I was like, it's a pink crop top.

Jonathan Correia:

Ooh, I did just get short shorts, so I can wear them...

Jacob Davidson:

That would be perfect for you, Jon.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, well, you can't wear crop tops without short shorts. It looksweird. outside of those. All I own are cargo pants. So those don't go with crop tops.

Jacob Davidson:

And now all you need are a pair of rollerskates

James Jay Edwards:

I want a closet full of fake band shirts. Like Like, like an eight right shirt or a shirt. You know, just like from all of the bands in these.

Jacob Davidson:

Like the Juicy Fruits.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, the Yeah. And the undead. Yeah, I would just be I want to closet.

Ama Lea:

Some Green Room shirts would be awesome to do. Oh, yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Ain't Right shirt. One that just said they Ain't Rights but it doesn't say Green Room anywhere on it just like like I gotta Ain't Right show I'd be the first preorder.

Jonathan Correia:

If you if you made an Impaled Anus shirt from Heavy Trip. Oh, man. Yes, I'm bringing up Heavy Trip again. Because that movie is incredible. Now, one of the big things that you have coming up is you actually did the cover photo or photo for Fangoria for the film. Werewolves Within. How was the what was the process with that? And it's very exciting. You actually this is actually getting me into Fangoria because well fuck, Ama is going to be on the show. I gotta, I gotta get that. So I'm now subscribed your Fangoria thing? Because of you. Especially since it's glow in the dark. I mean, that's awesome.

Jacob Davidson:

What the covers glow in the dark

Jonathan Correia:

For subscribers? Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Ooh, yeah. And also, I like their monthly subscription plan, because you pay $6.66 a month? On brand.

Jonathan Correia:

But what was the process behind that? And also, How exciting is it that it is going to be glow in the dark?

Ama Lea:

It's super cool. Um, so this is my fourth or fifth Fangoria cover over the course of like, 12 years. I think I've done stuff for different versions of Fangoria the different odors along the way. But this one was cool. Phil called me. And he's like, Hey, you know, COVID you know, compliance. Maybe, if this will can happen? Would you be interested? I was like, Yes. Like Sam Richardson is amazing. I'm so down. And he you know, he he told me it was werewolf related. And Phil was like, we're gonna do all werewolves. So they got the werewolf American Werewolf in London werewolf from Universal Studios, that was made by Magnus Effects may he has, like, every creature he's ever made in his shop still is like a cool horror museum that nobody gets to go to, like when we shot there with his giant werewolf. And with Sam. And it was super fun. There's so many more cool images that I hope get put inside the issue that we did. It was so so much fun. It was a total blast. It was like, kind of like the I mean, I had shot all through COVID but it was like the first time that it actually felt like, you know, like a comfortable shoot set to be on because we'd all been vaccinated at that point. And, you know, obviously, we're also wearing masks and stuff, but nobody was like, you know, stay the fuck away from me, like, everybody was like, Hey, how's it going? Let's make something really cool. And the Fangoria people Skyped in and watch the shoot from the east coast. So that was a process for it and then yeah, they come up with the glow in the dark cover in the post production stuff so I'm really excited to see it's you I haven't gotten to even hold the issue yet So we'll see.

Jonathan Correia:

Did you know going into it that they were gonna do glow in the dark or was that later on because it the way you shot that the lighting and everything for the lens to glow in the dark perfectly. So

Ama Lea:

um, the like, I don't know if I knew about the glow in the dark. I know the lighting was in the art direction. They're like, Oh, we want it super colorful. Like you know, like Creep Show is basically the direction so

Jonathan Correia:

that was one of my thoughts and and you've done is you said you've done other covers, but you've worked with a lot of like masters of horror, West Craven dari Argento, Cronenberg, Cronenberg. I mean, what was it like being working with them?

Ama Lea:

Um, it's, I mean, all of those shoots were amazing. Before I think Cronenberg was the only one that I was so nervous that I was like, like, they're like, okay, 15 minutes. So he gets here and I was like, Oh my god, I can't breathe, I might die.

James Jay Edwards:

Are you a big Cronenberg fan?

Ama Lea:

Huge? Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Huge. Yeah, I am. If I had to pick he's probably my favorite director.

Ama Lea:

Same.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, yeah, I would be the same. I would be like, what he's coming here.

Ama Lea:

We shot that at the Egyptian during Beyond Fest. So he was like signing everyone stuff. And then like, we built sets, you know, in front of the screen in the in the theater.

James Jay Edwards:

How is he? Is he cool?

Ama Lea:

Yes, super cool.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay.

Ama Lea:

Yeah, I mean, he's a little he's like direct and to the point. And, you know, he's like, he got 15 minutes that I'm gonna go to lunch because I'm hungry and I'm over this shit. But he was super he was super down. He was very easy to work with.

James Jay Edwards:

That was his hunger talking. Not him.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, he was hangry

James Jay Edwards:

my heart of hearts is telling me that he's not a jerk. And that's just kind of hunger talking.

Ama Lea:

Oh, he was no he wasn't a jerk at all. He was just he was just blunt. You know? Like, afterwards he like my editor for Delirium. Chris Alexander sent me a copy that the David like signed. And, like written me a little note on like, of the issue. So I was like, Oh thank you

James Jay Edwards:

so he was just hangry. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Which understandable because I mean, the events at Beyond Fest are so much fun, but they do go on for a long time.

James Jay Edwards:

If you caught him at the tail end of one of those Yeah, he probably was digested in his stomach.

Ama Lea:

Oh, it was they had a long day for him. Like he had been he had just done a big signing. And then they had to do a photo shoot with me at some other photo shoot and then, you know, an hour or two off then he had to go back and like, you know, do screenings all night. So they booked him for sure. lots to do.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh yeah, that's where you got to go to that one food cart. That's just like always a block or two away from the Egyptian that does bomb quesadillas is that's my go to when it's beyond fest time.

Ama Lea:

Like, I have actually, like postmated foods while waiting in line at Beyond Fast or no, it was like it was Do you guys remember when they did like a shark thing a few years ago?

Jacob Davidson:

Jaws 3D and the Meg?

Ama Lea:

Yes. And there were some other deep blue see maybe Yeah. It was one of those events. It was like free. So but there was like, you had to get there if you actually wanted a seat. So I think I waited in line like three or four hours and it was really hot out and I was just like, I need a Slurpee. Like postmated it

Jacob Davidson:

from the 711 around the corner.

Ama Lea:

Yeah. Well, I didn't want to get out of line.

James Jay Edwards:

Just a Slurpee?

Ama Lea:

Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Understandable as someone who

James Jay Edwards:

that is awesome.

Jonathan Correia:

As someone who only recently, uh, got rid of his Slurpee cups from over the years, like I owned like 20 various ones like I remember my fiance was like, do we really need to keep this Cowboys and Aliens Slurpee cup and it's like, well, it's a Slurpee cup. They're good for you know, if you're in rough shape, and you drop it and it breaks, who cares?

James Jay Edwards:

I had went from from when I was little. I had a Slurpee cup of at it was an Alice Cooper Slurpee cup. I wish I still had it. My sister had an Elton John one. It was like rock and roll star Slurpee cups. And, and I think they were random. But I ended up with Alice Cooper. And it's only in retrospect that I'm like, yeah, that was cool to have. I don't know who Alice Cooper was when I was like five. But I do now and I wish I had it.

Jonathan Correia:

Let me tell you, eBay.

Ama Lea:

Oh, yeah, probably. It's probably $200 for your house. So East Coast Guys, do you remember? These? They're not slurpees they're called slush puppies.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I got those. Like,

Ama Lea:

I was telling my partner about them the other day cuz he's, he's from the west coast. And I was like, you know, like a slush fund. He's like, what's that? Like? It's a thing where you get like, the ice slush. Then you like, push the juice into it. And he's like, what? And like, I have to like, look up videos. He's like, that looks disgusting. And I'm like, that is an East Coast Slurpee.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. No, that I got those all the time when I was a kid. Like, I'd like to get the blueberry flavor. You know, he just But yeah, I mean, it's just shaved ice and you just like fill it with the with like the flavor. Yes, sir.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you seen In the Heights?

Ama Lea:

Yes

Jacob Davidson:

not yet.

James Jay Edwards:

There's a fragua guy, which is basically a shaved ice dude. So he did so he's kind of imagined like a slush puppy. He like cars off the ice and puts the

Ama Lea:

fancier than the slush puppy. If you're

Jonathan Correia:

Slush puppies are not fancy, it's a literal syrup over ice. It's a.

Ama Lea:

It's like, it's like slop ice it isn't even like slush. Yeah, it's a water ice. It's not good

Jonathan Correia:

I think in Philly they call it water ice.

Jacob Davidson:

I've also heard it called slushes

Jonathan Correia:

slushes. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

slushies I've heard slushies, which is basically a ghetto Slurpee. It's like people who, you know, it's a place that isn't 711 that sells a Slurpee do called a slushie.

Ama Lea:

Yeah. If you know what, it's closer to the things you get at Sonic. Right, right. Yeah, nicer than the slush puppies are ghetto. But

Jonathan Correia:

I can't do Sonic after a film shoot in New Jersey when the entire crew got food poisoning from Sonic. And that was a it was a college shoot. So we were super low. Like I think there was 20 of us and we had five hotel rooms. So we were all like double beds doubled up. And so when 20 of us got food poisoning, having five bathrooms It was a warzone.

Jacob Davidson:

That's That's horrible.

Ama Lea:

That's awful.

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. So Sonic Sorry, I can

James Jay Edwards:

face the day after my second shot my second COVID shot. I felt like total ass and my wife is such an angel. She went to Sonic and got me one of those cookie dough blasts. She went all the way out to the sonic isn't that close to us? It's probably like 810 miles. She drove out there got me my cookie dough blast and brought it back to me. Oh, she's an angel. It did make me feel better. Ah, I'm a lucky guy.

Jonathan Correia:

That's awesome. Do you have any upcoming anything in production wise, or? I know You teased, like some possible t shirts. What can we look forward to coming from you in the future?

Ama Lea:

I'm trying to think of what I'm allowed to talk about. I working on a really, really cool anthology project with a lot of other filmmakers that I'm if not like, you know, I've done a lot of anthology films where it's like, everyone does their own thing. And it's a hodgepodge. And whatever, this we workshop, through the entire pandemic, and it all works together. It's all threaded together. It's really cool concept. I wish I could say more about it, but I'm super, super excited about that. Um, the coolest thing, fashion wise that I'm working on is I am recreating the sweater from black Christmas with a nice like on it. And that we should start pre selling in the next month or two. Just because it's it's a big process to get them here before the holidays. So, but I'm so excited for those like, like, yeah, every time I see like, you know, production, like, you know, charts and stuff of it coming together and like oh my god, this is the coolest thing I've ever done.

James Jay Edwards:

Is it actually a knit sweater? Yeah, I always see what I would love to have. Is that Apollo sweater from the shining, Danny's wearing, and you can get a T shirt with that printed on it. But I'm confident that it's got to be a sweater sweater bust. So I'm glad to hear that it's actual sweater and not

Ama Lea:

Oh no. This is like, this is like a completely accurate sweater to the one that in the movie. And it's one of those things like I don't know. I mean, maybe it's just a girl thing. But like, every time I've ever watched a movie like fuck, I wish I could get that sweater. comfy. It just it's so cool.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's a 70s vintage where

James Jay Edwards:

I say that about the shining though when I see Danny and his sweater, only much bigger and actually a sweater.

Ama Lea:

I made my partner a Danny sweater for Halloween a few years ago. Nice. Um, I but I don't know if if it's something I feel like. There's a company that actually made that sweater in the last few years. Like Like a fancy company like a Marc Jacobs had company that actually did a reproduction. The Apollo sweater. Hmm. Wow,

James Jay Edwards:

I haven't seen that. I've seen a couple. Like it was like a like a long sleeve t shirt with that screen printed on it. But not an actual sweater.

Ama Lea:

No, this was a real sweater. But I want to say it was like $500 Yeah, pass No. Like, it is cool.

James Jay Edwards:

You know how many eight right shirts that would be? Okay, cool. Well, thank you for joining us. Where can people if they want to follow along if Want to get more updates on this movie that you can tell us any more about? Where can people find you on the socials?

Ama Lea:

Um, I think pretty much on everything I am @MissAmaLea twitter instagram and my clothing company is PoltergeistsandParamours.com.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, everybody go there you you will not be disappointed with the selection at Poltergeists and Paramours it's if you ever wanted a bathing suit that is in the pattern of the shining carpet. Now you know where you can go if you want

Jonathan Correia:

a screen accurate Paul Williams vest from Phantom of the Paradise. Yep, families got you covered. And also congratulations on five years with BNP like that.

Ama Lea:

It went by very fast.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, there, there'll be many more to come we'll make sure that

Ama Lea:

Cheers guys,

James Jay Edwards:

thank you again for joining us. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So go give them a listen and our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go give him some love. You can find us at Eye On Horror the Facebook page, the Twitter the Instagram, the letterbox or at iHorror calm and I don't know Korea's non but I'm probably forgetting something. He's the social media guru.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, we're not on letterbox but I do make a thorough list of every movie we mentioned on it. So when we do the rapid fire throwing out four or five titles is when I hate us. And

Jacob Davidson:

every every list will have at least one reference to Rampage guaranteed.

Ama Lea:

You just feel like an extra shout out to Henry Rollins.

James Jay Edwards:

Alright, so um, thank you for joining us again, Ama. And thank you for listening to us and we'll see you in a couple of weeks. So for me James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm Jonathan Correia

Ama Lea:

and I'm Ama Lea

James Jay Edwards:

keep your Eye On Horror.

Virtual vs In-Person Film Fests
Return of Johnny Mneumonic!
Ama's intro to horror
Slumber Party Massacre
Ama's filmmaking credits
Poltergeists and Paramours
Merch licenses
New Englanders Unite
Fake Band Tees
Fangoria
Cronenberg
Postmating Slurpees
Ama's upcoming projects