Eye On Horror

Let's Get Lost (Films)!

June 20, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 11
Eye On Horror
Let's Get Lost (Films)!
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, the guys dive into the world of lost movies, but not before discussing The Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It (and the Warrens).

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James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror The official podcast of iHorror.com This is Episode 67 otherwise known as season four Episode 11. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host Jacob Davison How you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing good though is happy to be back.

James Jay Edwards:

Cool. Also with us yet again as always, and for the end of time is your other other host Jon Correia what's going on Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, nothing much got I had a little incident outside my apartment this morning, which was weird. I live on the second floor. There's just like I heard some rustling and then some shouting and then I looked down and there's just a man with a with a long pole, just like whacking at the trees and shit that are right below my balcony. Looks like he was about to break in the apartment one. So I had to go deal with that for a little bit, and no one got hurt. Everyone's good. The guy the guy went away. But

James Jay Edwards:

was he actually trying to break in? Or was he like a gardener?

Jonathan Correia:

definitely wasn't a gardener. I live across the street from Dollar Tree. So we get some real interesting characters. I go across the street from Dollar Tree in the valley. So yeah, we get interesting characters. But we it's funny. We used to seem a lot more when we were in our old apartment because we had birds. We had a perfect view of it. But now we're behind that apartment. And there's a lot of trees and foliage in front of our thing. So I thought we were going to encounter less but he surprised me.

James Jay Edwards:

All right, I'm glad that there's a happy ending. And I'm glad that you were safe. I'm glad that you didn't get hit with a pipe.

Jonathan Correia:

That would hurt.

James Jay Edwards:

Cool. What's been going on this week? I know. One thing that's been going on and this is we may as well get this out of the way now. The Conjuring The Devil Made Me Do It was released. Did you guys see it?

Jacob Davidson:

No. No, not yet.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, I figure Correia isn't gonna see it. I saw it. It's um, probably the worst of the three Conjuring movies, but it's still better than anything else in the Conjuring universe except for maybe Annabel Comes Home which I really liked. It's it's not the movie I wanted from the demon werewolf case that you know that I've always said I wanted a movie. It's not really that but it's it's also not as much of a legal thriller as people are making it out to be people are making out to be like Exorcism of Emily Rose, where it's like, takes place in a court. And it isn't that it's basically Yeah, sure, and Lorraine are trying to prove that this guy is not guilty by reason of demonic possession is actually that that's the whole deal. But it is a lot of them investigating. You know, and it's not courtroom stuff. So yeah, it's you know, it is what it is. It's, it's a conjuring movie,

Jonathan Correia:

which I do want to reiterate that if we have to rely. Yeah, I'm gonna do it. We have to, you have to remember that that's that that was like, a lot of this stuff in that movie didn't happen. Let's be honest.

James Jay Edwards:

No, it, they absolutely took a lot of liberties with the real Yes, a lot of liberties

Jonathan Correia:

and who they were as people. But the fact that the Warrens in real life testified and tried to prove that a murderer was innocent via being demonically possessed by a werewolf is extremely fucked up.

James Jay Edwards:

Not only tried to do that they somewhat succeeded because he was only convicted of manslaughter. And he straight up murdered his landlord. I mean, that's that's a fact. And they got him off as manslaughter. And the dude's out of jail and live in life right now. So I mean, he, he, they were pretty much successful because he could have gotten the death penalty.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I am. And, you know, I, you know, people have different opinions about the death penalty. I think this, you know, this person needed help. And I don't think that type of interference with it with an American legal court case, in real life was was appropriate, necessary, and just is is all around. It's just messed up. But yeah, we already know my opinions on the Warrens.

James Jay Edwards:

And I gotta say, it made good books and movies, though, which is pretty much what the Warrens are about, I guess.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. At this point when it comes to the Warrens. I feel like that one guy at the party who likes to bring up you know, you know, John Lennon was, you know, a bad man who hit women. And it's like, yeah, it's, You know, it's true, but Like, you know, people are already making up their minds and it's probably not going to change any minds. But yes, the Warrens were bad people

James Jay Edwards:

will kind of following that thread. Another thing that I saw on on Friday night, and this is kind of thanks to Jacob because he posted on his Facebook but Cina Madness did an online kind of premiere, although people have seen it already. Of What Happens Next Will Scare You.

Jacob Davidson:

Yes.

James Jay Edwards:

Which Jacobs already talked about it. So we won't talk about it too much from a plot standpoint, but it's the new movie from the WNUF Halloween Special guys. And it looks like it is I mean, it's it's like low budget and it was geared towards me as somebody who as a scholar of urban legends, and creepy pastas, and as someone who hunts down these viral scary videos, which is basically what the movie is about it It hit all my sweet spots. It's It's pretty cool. But there's one segment in it Correia that you will love because it is basically about the Warrens and there's a shop owner who gets a cursed teddy bear. It's although it it's the most fucked up teddy bear you'll ever look at it doesn't look like a real teddy bear but for lack of a better word a cursed teddy bear. That's totally supposed to be Annabel and then he brings in this couple who they're not called the Warrens their names something else. But but they're obviously the Warrens. They um, brings them in to to basically exercise this demon from this grizzly bear this Yeah, this teddy bear. And it's pretty hilarious. You'll love it, because it's pretty much making fun of this couple, but not really. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

I think my favorite segments still is the 911 phone call from the mortuary.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, from the Night of the Living Dead, or the Return of the Living Dead mortuary?

Jacob Davidson:

Kinda? Yeah. Although that one was genuinely freaky, like that wouldn't got to me. But yeah, no, I even donated to the What Happens Next Will Scare You Kickstarter. came for a DVD.

James Jay Edwards:

I saw your name in the in the credits at the end.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, well, you know, I donated for to get it like I donated. So I think it's like a list listing and the DVD. That's that sort of thing. I am interested in checking out some of the special features that they're gonna include on that. But yeah, no, it was one of my favorite anthology movies on the festival circuit last year. So I'm really glad that it's getting more attention and the Cinematic Void showed it and yeah, no, I hope I hope more people check it out. It's so it's a lot of fun.

James Jay Edwards:

It's funny because it's not really an anthology, but it is because of all these little videos are watching and it's not really found footage, but it is because of the videos they're watching. It really hit me was really creative the way they did it. And it hit all the sweet spot. It checked all the boxes for me. So I was and it's got some really great practical effects too. Oh, yeah. There's even a Bigfoot segment. So yeah, about Bigfoot. I mean, is the icing on the cake? For me? Yeah, that movie was made for me. It

Jacob Davidson:

was printed and keep an eye out for a couple of actors from WNUF. Who pop up again in here. Yeah. Oh, and terms of stuff. I've watched Um, well, for my birthday. I ordered the Christopher Lee box set and just came in last week and it has been very interesting to go through. Because Yeah, its this box set that Severin Films put out that it's a bunch of movies from Christopher Lee's Euro phase where he did a bunch of like, kind of weird and obscure horror movies in like Italy, Spain and Eastern Europe. And yeah, some of them are pretty interesting. I think probably one of my favorites so far that I've watched. Is this one called Castle of the Living Dead, where he plays a evil count named count. A Drago.

Jonathan Correia:

Draco

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, no relation to Dracula.

Jonathan Correia:

And no relation to Victor Drago from Rocky 4?

Jacob Davidson:

No, that sadly. But yeah, it's like about this. It's like takes place during the Napoleonic Wars. And it's about this Carnival troupe that ends up staying at Christopher Lee's castle and it kind of turns into like a weird clot Cross of Dracula tourist trap and House of Wax. And also Donald Sutherland is in it as a Napoleonic Captain who's kind of crazy so that was pretty fun. And also another highlight mostly because the title is this one called the Torture Chamber of Doctor Sadism

Jonathan Correia:

excellent title. Excellent.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. Now you gotta love those 60s 70s Horror titles where they just kind of went all in on trying to scare you even in the titles,

Jonathan Correia:

but that box set is gorgeous like, Oh, yeah, so well put together there's there's a bunch of great movies. I think only one movie is a reap. And it's the Doctor Sadism. That was on the hemisphere box at that Severin put out but it also includes an anthology series that Christopher Lee hosted that was I I believe Finnish or

Jacob Davidson:

Polish

Jonathan Correia:

Polish

Jacob Davidson:

Theatre Macabre.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, and it comes with CDs. There's a booklet. That's that's a box that I'm really excited to dig into one of these days. I haven't yet but i will soon.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah, no, there's a lot of good stuff on there. I also enjoyed this oneCcrypt of the Vampire, which is kind of a loose Spanish Italian remake of Carmela or Vampire Lovers. And also, Funny enough, Lee plays the vampire hunter. In this one he doesn't play the vampire.

Jonathan Correia:

Ah, that's a change of pace.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's always interesting when that happens. And also it is kind of fun watching a bunch of these because like they're in black and white and they're kind of in that kind of like euro gothic horror movie stuff. Like, like a lot of them are very Mario Bava ish.

Jonathan Correia:

Love me some Bava.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, and what's better than Christopher Lee and derivative Bava?

Jonathan Correia:

I can't think of much now I haven't been watching good movies lately. Actually. I did watch one it's not exactly Horror but have you guys seen Heavy Trip yet? The finish yet the finish heavy metal movie. First of all, if you haven't already, Vinegar Syndrome is having their partners only month and they have an exclusive slipcover for this this was put out by another company. But they have an awesome slip cover where the slip cover looks like artwork for the band in the movie, which is called wrecked anus is what it's called. So that's what it says on the cover and on the back they have a reindeer with an upside down cross on its forehead and flames and there's an ongoing joke in the movie I tweeted about it on our page the other day about what kind of music that the band plays and it's it's it's a great ongoing joke because anytime someone's like, oh, what kind of music do you play instantly? believe it's the bass player just goes without missing a beat he just goes symphonic post apocalyptic reindeer grinding Christ abusing extreme more pagan fino Scandinavian metal. And yes, I had to read that because I do not have that memorized. Yet, but Heavy Trip is absolutely phenomenal. A lot of a lot of it reminded me of Metalocalypse minus all the you know millionaire put apocalyptic, you know, storytelling with that. It's just a lot of similar humor, but it's got a real heart to it. And it's absolutely funny. Highly, highly recommend and that slipcover is so goddamn awesome. Like, I can't recommend it enough. On the flip side of that this morning, I woke up early. And I went You know what? I've bought this DVD app Dollar Tree across the street for a

buck. Let's watch The Car:

Road to Revenge. A sequel that came out in 2019 to the 1970s the car starring James Brolin.

James Jay Edwards:

Now, is it a legit sequel? Or is it like an Amityville thing where anybody can call it The Car? Hard to tell?

Jonathan Correia:

That is? That is a question. It's a good one. And I kind of have to answer that question with another question. And that is who the fuck was this movie made for? Cuz, Cuz again, it's a sequel that came out in 2019 to a 1970s Jaws rip off, which is an excellent Jaws rip off. I think it's it's the best Jaws rip off. There is personal opinion, of course. But it has almost nothing to do with the original car. I kid you not. It's an hour and a half long. So of course it's about a car. It's about this DA who's kind of skeezy or kind. He's very skeezy. But he gets murdered, it takes place in the future. There's a lot of future tech in it. But he gets murdered and stabbed in the eye thrown out a window and lands on his car. So he ends up possessing his car and is killing all these future gang members. About an hour and eight minutes into the movie, the car gets dismantled. So this random ass mechanic who's played by Ronnie Cox, who was the sheriff in the original movie goes, Oh, I'm gonna fix this. I have just the car pulls up the tarp. And it's the car from the original movie, attaches like the front bumper bit to it. And then the car immediately like wakes up and murders him and then just drives off. And it's like, that's the only connection to the original movie there is. But by this point, this car has already been killing people for 45 minutes. So it's not like it's a car that got put had the bits from the original car put into it from the get go. This was just a later edition. And it's and it's again, I can't stress enough who was this movie made for? The I understand that it must have had some like budgetary things but like it felt like it was made in the early 90s you know Just like real cheap, direct to video. There's some, there's, it's very, it's pretty misogynistic. There's some really terrible writing one of the lines that really stuck out to me, were these detectives that were talking. These are supposed to be professional detectives. And they're talking about a perp and one of them goes, Oh, yeah, that's so and so he's got a rap sheet as long as my dick. And then it just kind of hangs there, like two or three moments, as if it was a good joke.

James Jay Edwards:

And it makes you wonder, is he saying is he trying to talk about how big his dick is? Or how short the guy's rap sheet is,

Jonathan Correia:

if the other detective went? Oh, so he had committed so he's a, he's got a clean rap sheet that would have been that would have been, you know, kind of entertaining. But no, just left it at a I got a big dick joke. So I wouldn't recommend it. I mean, I guess I got it on DVD at Dollar Tree for a buck. I wouldn't say I got my money's worth. But it's, it's a movie it exists. I'm really, I really hope the crew and cast got paid decently on it

James Jay Edwards:

is the scene where they break out the original car somewhere on YouTube, because I kind of only want to see that scene,

Jonathan Correia:

maybe

James Jay Edwards:

I might have to look that up.

Jonathan Correia:

But even that scene, it's so short, it's only like a minute long.

James Jay Edwards:

I just want to see, I just want to see how they handle it. But I don't want to put any time investment into it.

Jonathan Correia:

There's there's one part where like he's the cars getting, it's like one of the big chase scenes, the chase scenes are terribly shot. But like the car stops, turns around. And there's like all these guys and you know, they're on big machine guns in the back of trucks and stuff. And so the car starts like driving at them and they're all shooting at him. And he does this, they the car does this thing where like, you know, hits the brakes and like swings the back, you know, to like, you know, you know, burn some rubber. And like, you can see the car almost coming to a complete stop and then all sudden, it just cuts to this wide shot of this CGI of the CGI version of the car flipping through the air, just like fu fu fu during the 360s and as it's flipping over all the all these bad guys, it takes off the head of the to many gun runners and then lands perfectly and just drives off

James Jay Edwards:

you're kinda selling me on wanting to see. Because that scene sounds awesome.

Jonathan Correia:

I think some people will get some awfully good, you know, entertainment out of it. I it. It just wasn't for me. I wasn't who I was made for. So if you liked The Car: The Revenge, I would love to hear you. I you guys know me, I don't like to punch down on anything that people you know, put their blood sweat and tears into. So I'm sure there's an audience out there. But it definitely wasn't for me, it's from the director who did Death Race 2050 which That was fun, a bit, but it was still very in the same vein. But I just I don't understand how that type of like humor and that type of like style would work for a sequel to The Car. It just it felt very, it felt like they wanted to make this other movie. And then the only way they could get funding is by calling it the car and they're like, Alright, we'll add in this like two, two minutes scene that puts it in. It does get entertaining once they do put the class the original cars bits on because it just cuts to like, the car in rage mode. And it's just running running over like runs over like five or six random people on its way to like the bad guy lair. So that part was kind of fun, but

James Jay Edwards:

wouldn't have been more fun if they had called it something else. And the the old car bits was a complete surprise maybe and like an Easter egg kind of thing.

Jonathan Correia:

It's just totally different. It's kind of like Lawnmower Man and Lawnmower Man 2 where it's like, a kinda kind of has a connection to the first one, but not really. I then like for some reason puts it into the future for some, you know, random. There's like a whole thing about people getting modifications and technology and there's a lot of Boomer talk. It's Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

going back to, to not quite horror, but it is kind of horrific. And also we've talked enough about Eric Andre that I'm going to talk about Bo Burnham. Have you guys seen his Netflix special inside?

Jonathan Correia:

Four times

Jacob Davidson:

Not yet

James Jay Edwards:

You have you really watched it four times? I

Jonathan Correia:

watched it four times.

Jacob Davidson:

Wow.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, what happened is he got a contract to do a comedy special before the pandemic hit. And then the pandemic. So he basically made his comedy special in his in his house. So it's a lot of like, you know, it starts off all happy, you know, monologues funny jokes, songs and stuff. And then as it goes on, and it gets toward the end, you could tell you know, his beards getting his hairs getting all messed up and his beards getting shaggy and stuff. And it takes a pretty dark turn. And it's you almost can watch the guy go crazy in front of your eyes. It's like an hour and a half special. It's really it's kind of disturbing, but it does have some really funny parts, the bit, About his reaction video bit just had me rolling on the floor.

Jonathan Correia:

His reaction to his to he like he does a 32nd song and then he does a reaction video to it and it just keeps going

James Jay Edwards:

that a reaction video to his reaction, it Inceptions

Jonathan Correia:

No, I thought inside was absolutely brilliant. Because it has that ominous presence even in the beginning when it's not that ominous because you get to see the you know, quarantine happen in real time as this guy tries to make a comedy special on his own. And even like the really comedic bits, like he, you know, it randomly cuts to a song about, you know, white woman's Instagrams or sexting and stuff. And even through those songs, you get this feeling like, yeah, this is him trying to do work. This is him working through the emotions of isolation and loneliness and all that. And I think I already said it to someone I was like, when in the future when they in the history class when they're talking about 2020. And what it was like they're gonna use this film as the example this is, you know, quarantines world at war with

James Jay Edwards:

this is it's like you talked about when we we've talked about COVID ad nauseum. But you were talking about how like, shaming people who don't come out of COVID, knowing another language, or having built a website, or so I would say, people dealt with the lockdown in the quarantine in their own way. And if the only way you had to deal with it was to lay on your couch and watch movies. Hey, you do you? So this is how Bo Burnham dealt with quarantine is he kept working because he had this contract for this for this comedy special. And no one would have faulted him for reneging on it or postponing it or whatever. But he's like, No, I'm gonna make my special.

Jonathan Correia:

And you can tell in the beginning, he's like, this is a great idea. I'm going to do it all myself. And he has that nice montage in the beginning where you see him, you know, not super clean shaven, but it was very clearly early pandemic. And then like it cuts to like an it's like a montage of him learning how to do lighting, learning how to use these different programs, learning how to do all the equipment. And then like, by the time he gets to like the first song you can tell he put in the time and he put in the work to do the writing but also to learn everything so he could pull off and he pulls off some really creative technical stuff with just even that opening number with called Content, where he's just like singing about getting back to work and whatnot. And then all sudden he turns on his headlight and points it up to a disco ball and he just fills the room with like beams of light. And he's he says, Daddy made you your favorite. Open wide. Here's, look, here comes the content. Like Yeah, I thought it was absolutely brilliant. And I didn't know that people like me who turned 30 during quarantine needed an anthem, but he gave us one. And I respect him for that. No, I

Jacob Davidson:

gotta check that out then. And it's Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it's definitely worth watching at least once. It I don't know if I could handle it four times. I mean, it gets dark by the end

Jonathan Correia:

those those the songs have been stuck in my head all week. I've been listening to the ad. They didn't have it the songs on streaming things yet. So like the fourth one is kind of like a cop because I would just have Netflix, if you watch it on your phone. It goes to a small screen. We do other stuff. So I'd be driving and it would be playing. I wouldn't be watching it while driving don't worry folks, but I would have the audio playing through the thing. We'll do it runs and whatnot. But yeah, I can't recommend it enough. It is it does. It does. Yeah. It does remind you like, Oh, wow. That was rough. What we just went through and in case you forgot. Yeah. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Going back to out the Alamo recently. And what Yeah, I've been to a couple repertory screenings since the last show that I think you'd find interesting. For one. I got to see a repertory screening of the 1999 The Mummy remake with Brendan Fraser and Rachel wise

Jonathan Correia:

Fuck Yeah, dude.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I honestly kind of forgot how fun that movie is.

Jonathan Correia:

Dude that movie still slaps

Jacob Davidson:

It slaps so hard.

Jonathan Correia:

And that movie have woken So, so many people's sexualities across to him because every one of that movie is hot, but it is such a it's so much fun. Come on. I mean, the classic. We got the horses. Hey, Benny, you're on the wrong side. What?

Jacob Davidson:

No, that just it's it's very funny, too. I forgot about that. Like this. There's so many great gags like when Brendan Frasier screams at the mummies. And then the mummy screams louder at him and he didn't so he decided to run away.

Jonathan Correia:

Its so good

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, a lot of Brendan Frasier screaming at mommy's in this movie. But yeah, no just said it. Yeah, it was. Real tentpole blockbuster back in the summer of 99. Like this was the kind of movie that like me and all my friends back in middle school, were just like, oh man, did you see The Mommy we got to go see the mummy. Just because you know, it's the right blend of Action, Comedy and horror. Yeah. Because it just hits all the genres real, real well. And also, the practice of the effects hold up surprisingly better than I would have thought, you know, granted some of the CG not so much, but there's so much practical effects and they do a lot of the CG in a subtle way that it didn't feel, you know, too distracting.

Jonathan Correia:

And the CG held's up better than the CG in the sequels. I'm looking at your PlayStation two looking at the rock Scorpion King at the end of The Mummy Returns.

Jacob Davidson:

Like even as a kid when I saw the Mummy Returns that that effect looks awful. Yeah. Yeah, that was that was ridiculous.

Jonathan Correia:

But hey, we got five Scorpion King movies out of it.

Jacob Davidson:

So yeah, I always forget about that. It was worth it.

James Jay Edwards:

Wasn't that The Rock's big screen debut though? He was a wrestler back then. Right. So yeah, so it gave us Dwayne The Rock Johnson which we cannot understate that significance with the three of us then

Jacob Davidson:

we got Rampage. It's it's a domino effect.

Jonathan Correia:

They do show him in Mummy Returns, not CGI, you know, Scorpion human centar hybrid in the beginning for like, a minute or two. And I think that's the bit that the Scorpion King sequels are more based on then.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And which is funny, because I don't think the sequels even really acknowledge that because they just kind of went and did their own thing to the Scorpion King.

Unknown:

Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know. I haven't really seen them. I just know that they got some really random people that like Billy Zane is in one Ron Perlman. And one of these days I'll deep dive into them. Once I finished the Universal Soldier movies. I still got Day of Reckoning to go.

Jacob Davidson:

And yesterday, though, I saw John Water's Serial Mom.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes, dude, you're you're seeing all the good ones in the theaters right now.

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, I've been looking forward to this for months and months, you know, just ever since the shutdown, just I was hungry to go back to the theaters. And so I've been going back to theaters with a vengeance. And yeah, Serial Mom was a lot of fun. I think I watched it on TV like years ago, but I didn't really remember it that well. So it was kind of fun to experience it on a big screen. Especially because it was a brunch screening. So I got to get I gotta get a big old thing of French toast. Anyway. Yeah, no, it's like John Waters response to. I mean, I think it's kind of the closest thing he's ever done to a horror movie, but also, it's a satire of kind of the true crime and cord obsession TV of the early 90s. Also, I forgot how stack that cast is because I mean, in the immediate family alone, you got Kathleen Turner Sam Waterston, Matthew Lillard, Ricki Lake, and, you know, it's just really fun to see Kathleen Turner go berserk. And also watch Blood Feast with Matthew Lillard. Yeah, like he, john waters does show some of his favorite, his inspirations and favorites. In the movie, there's even some clips of the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. But yeah, it's basically that this 1950s ish or like old school, suburban mom, who as it turns out, is a serial killer and just starts killing everybody who's rude or annoying or you know, just does things that go against her ethical code. And it kind of do and also kind of deals with the family kind of coming to terms with the fact that their mom is a serial killer. So it's very wacky it's john waters, so you can expect it to be crossing line and a lot of ways

James Jay Edwards:

Have you seen I'm just I just this is for either of you. Have you guys seen Pink Flamingos? Yes. Oh years ago here okay, I'm just wondering how many people who are who have discovered john waters have gone back that far. Because Pink Flamingos for me is an I don't know how to say not peak john waters but it is what john waters embodies

Jacob Davidson:

his essence.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's Yeah, it's his essence. And everything after that has been like, you know, high budget but Pink Flamingos just like no budget. No, it's like yeah, nothing so I'm just always curious to see all the people who are into john waters now if they've gone back that far.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. I mean,

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, it's a classic. It's a trash cinema class.

Jonathan Correia:

Can you really say that you went to you know film school if you didn't watch Divine pick up a piece of old dog shit and eat it like it was your film degree really worth the money if if you weren't exposed to that at some point over your two or four year program?

Jacob Davidson:

My sentiment Exactly.

James Jay Edwards:

But it wouldn't have been in a class it would have been

Jacob Davidson:

just a bunch of the film freaks watching it in a basement or something.

James Jay Edwards:

What are your classmates going check this out.

Jacob Davidson:

That was pretty much us. Also, same with Freddy Got Fingered like we would all like assemble in the dorm and watch Freddy Got Fingered together and just loser shit was just

Jonathan Correia:

about to say that the very first time I had I got together with like fellow film, like the first time I'm like, Yes, I'm hanging out with scholarly film folk. We're going to Oh man, I'm from a small town. We never talked about film in depth and all this is gonna be, I'm gonna be I'm going to be prepared. Someone might bring up Citizen Kane. I hope I have a good analysis of that. What are we watching tonight? We're watching Freddy Got Fingered? Is this what film school is? Without film school? I don't know if I would have discovered Roadhouse so early. So you know, shout out I just

James Jay Edwards:

always wonder like people who who know john waters from like, Serial Mom or Cecile B Demented or something. It's like, you know, they investigated his I mean, because pink flamingos is basically about two different well one couple and one person competing to be the most disgusting person on earth. And the lengths they go to and like you know, Corre a said to Devine basically wins the title by and it's not it his really happened it's a one ake a little poodle takes a d mp. And it goes from ass to mou h eats a turd right out of t is poodles but and when you re watching it you're like it because also after she does 't she looks at the camera w th this literal shit eating g in, gag it

Jonathan Correia:

it's brilliant. It's it's Yeah, and you know, john waters carries a lot of that throughout his films like even when he gets the big budgets except for like maybe Hairspray and Cry Baby like the tone is still there. But like he still goes for it. I mean, you bring up Cecile B Demented and there's some you know, really hardcore bits in that or one of my favorites. A Dirty Shame because that movie for some reason was playing on Comedy Central the time when I was like 12 or 13 Johnny Knoxville Yeah, let's watch every time it was on and I still to this day though. The Bears joke kills me. What are your friendly neighborhood bears rrrrrr

Jacob Davidson:

speaking of called cinema I showed my roommates Barb and Star go to Vista Del Mar.

Jonathan Correia:

Fuck yes,

Jacob Davidson:

I've indoctrinated more people into the cult of Barb and Star.

Jonathan Correia:

You can't bring up that movie with me. I'm trying to get my rewatch percentage below 20% I finally got it to 24.9 but now that you mentioned Barb and Star, I'm gonna have to watch it again

Jacob Davidson:

today so worth it though. It still holds up.

James Jay Edwards:

Just watch Bo Burnham's inside again, Correia.

Jonathan Correia:

That's what screwed up my percentage pretty much.

James Jay Edwards:

Barb and Star and Bo Burnham.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

now there's a combination. Yeah. Recently, I finally saw the lost horror movie of George J. Romero on Shudder, The Amusement Park and it met up to the hype. Holy shit.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's, it's crazy. I mean, it's, you can understand why the Lutheran society chickened out on releasing it? Yeah, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

it was too extreme for the Lwe friends and I can see why. And just don't even so much that it's scary, just so much how bleak it is. And also it is like a nightmare. It's a nightmare movie, you know, with just a way that it's surreal. And there's a lot of allegories for out and you know, it's it's very sad and depressing to watch. Which you know, Grant it's about elder abuse and the way society mistreat the elderly. But yeah, it hits hard.

James Jay Edwards:

stylistically, I think it's closest to Romero Season of the Witch, because it's because it's it's almost like a dream, you know, type of a thing. But content wise, yeah, you're right. I mean, the analogies are thin. I mean, to the point where the old guy gets into an accident in a bumper car, and then he's treated by the cops like, well, when was last eye test you had, you know, and they don't believe him as a witness. Because he's old. Like, what what your memory is going, you know, it's like,

Jacob Davidson:

or the scene where like the bike, the literal Hells Angels beat him up and mug him and there's a specter of death with them. Well,

James Jay Edwards:

death is kind of following him for the whole thing. Like in the background, that's the most obvious scene but if you look, you know, death is basically which is another thing. It's like death has always fallen these elderly people around. Yeah, it's a it's a crazy one.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And also, and also, like, there's this scene where he tries to read the three little pigs to a little girl. And it is just heartbreaking because like, she just she leaves them crying. And then that was tough.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, her parents think that he's gonna kidnapper molester or something. I mean, it

Jacob Davidson:

felt like it was more just like they're they were abandoning him. Well,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, maybe I guess it could be ret I thought they regarded him with suspicion. Like he had some ulterior motive than just being nice to a kid. Yeah, maybe a little bit of both. But

Jacob Davidson:

either way, just you know that it just leaves him like sobbing is just yeah, that that was that was depressing.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's it's a tough watch.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, but It was worth it it is it still holds up surprisingly well for what was supposed to be a PSA.

James Jay Edwards:

And you know, I said the story behind it is probably better than that. Well, not better than a movie but is as good because, you know, the Lutherans didn't want to show it. They commissioned him to make it didn't want to show it. So it went into a vault for what, 40 years. Yeah, which is gonna bring us to our topic. This is a good segue. I'm the king of segues. Remember, we're going to talk about lost movies, and lost bits of movies. And for me, when i when i a lot of things come to mind when I think of lost movies, but the one that I always think of first 1965 MGM vault fire, which basically destroyed almost the entire library of MGM silent films. So you lost a bunch of lawn cheney silent movies, including London After Midnight, which is kind of a holy grail for a lot of horror collectors. And a few years back, I think it was on Turner Classic. They tried to I mean, I won't even say they tried to they because because it didn't come close at all, but they they did like they took the script and did like reading of it with stills from the thing. So what I mean it wasn't a movie, but they kind of re reenacted the story. It's kind of a vampire tale, I guess. But that's one of the real shames you know, I mean, a lot of launch ad stuff was lost of the early cheney you know, pre universal stuff. But London After Midnight's the real bummer

Jacob Davidson:

ya know that every time I hear about it, it does sound really fun. Because Yeah, and it's one of those things where kind of the mystery about it being the last movie enhanced people's attention to it because like one of the only things that really divided by was that really creepy still, of Lon Chaney and his disguise looking like, monster man,

James Jay Edwards:

he looks like something off the Haunted Mansion.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, he does it. He's got like a serrated teeth. And he's got like the big top hat. Yeah. And he's got like the Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. Set up and like with the big eyes,

James Jay Edwards:

and it was London after midnight was an early Todd Browning joint. Which kind of segues us into another last thing Correia take it

Jonathan Correia:

Freaks, I mean

James Jay Edwards:

the whole thing isn't lost. But oh,

Jonathan Correia:

freaks. Yeah. But Freaks is what is one of those extremely infamous films. I mean, when Todd Browning first showed a cut of it, people were mortified by,

James Jay Edwards:

like, run from the theaters. mortified,

Jonathan Correia:

like, and it was it by today's standards, it's not but and it was, it was mostly due to prejudice, people were just mortified at seeing people with who were abnormal. And and that was, that was most of it. But there's a lot of footage that was cut from the film for theatrical that is forever lost. And that's, that's so sad, because it's such a brilliant film. It's so good even and it's very similar to Orson Welles' Magnificent Ambersons, which actually, and that's one of the things that prompted us to talk about this. They're looking for that footage, because I don't know if you know the story behind the Magnificent ambersons. But that was Orson Welles his follow up to Citizen Kane. And there were there's talks that it was even better than Citizen Kane, he definitely thought it was it was a much more personal story. But when they showed it to test audiences, it was all teenagers who just did not care about it at all. So the studio ripped it from his hands, he was in Brazil, or, yeah, he was in South America filming stuff for the government, and they took it from him cut it up. His editor sent him a print of the original cut to South America, and to review and to have and apparently like they, you know, all the footage is lost. But apparently there's no paper trail showing that that print made it back to the studio. So they're actually launching an exquisite expedition. I think TMC is behind it. And they're going to make a documentary about searching for that director's cut of the Magnificent Ambersons. And they're set to go out this fall. But if they find that cut, could you imagine just like them finding an Orson Welles movie that's that is because Magnificent Ambersons as is is still a really great film. It was nominated for like four or five Academy Awards that year. And so if there's an even better cut of that film, PA, but yeah, freaks is is one that really hits my heart because that's one of my all time favorite movies, though, was one that really showed me the potential of a horror film in not only being scary, but getting to the heart of like, society and issues and prejudice. And yeah, it's just such a gorgeous film. And who knows, maybe they once found a john Ford movie called Young Mr. Lincoln under someone's barn, like this was a lost early john Ford film. And it was found in a barn it was able to be restored. So I you know, there's still hope if it's on celluloid, there's a potential it could be out there.

Jacob Davidson:

Hopefully one of my favorite examples is Fritz Lang's Metropolis. Because you know that one, you know, it's one considered one of the greatest sci fi epics of the silent film era, if not the 20th century. And it was almost lost forever. And for the longest time, like most of the film was lost. And like, you know, that what we got was a truncated version from like, edited international versions, like the original was lost for a long time. And eventually, if it was one of those cases where Yeah, it was like you were saying, they found the footage in a very unexpected place. In that case, like the extended Metropolis footage was in a salt mine in Eastern Europe or something. So like, I remember what a big deal it was when they managed to put together a more complete version, like I actually saw that print from, I think it was Yanis or Kino Lorber. But yeah, I watched it and play at the Coolidge corner theatre back in the early two, or late 2000s. And, man, it's just still just a feast for the eyes. And it's always amazing, you know, that like some of the greatest art in the 20th century could have been lost forever. Same goes for Murneu's Nosferatu, which was last for a long time. And also a lot of so I think it was the case where the Bram Stoker estates sued him because it was a ripoff of Dracula. So the reason it's survived was because bootleggers are film collectors held on to the printer Nosferatu, and they were able to make copies.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. And that Metropolis cut the complete one. I actually saw that in theaters with a live orchestra. They weren't able to play the original music because that, unfortunately is lost most of it. But the rescore they did for it was it was gory, and it was so cool to experiencing how it was because that's how they did scores back then was they would have live musicians perform. So that was such a beautiful experience

James Jay Edwards:

isn't the complete version of Metropolis like twice as long as the truncated one?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I think it's like two and a half hours. Okay.

Jonathan Correia:

And let's not forget the 1980s Giorgio Marauder version where it's cut to like at synth pop.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say, talk about not knowing what music is supposed to go.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, so you just about anything. It's also like, I've got one of my other favorites, Der Golem. Like I got the blu ray from Kino Lorber. And it's got like four different soundtracks to choose from. Because Yeah, like a lot of the original music was lost for these silent film era movies. So you know, this, you can kind of pick and choose, although I actually saw that with a live orchestra a couple times too. So that was always interesting.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's get more modern with this. And let's talk about one that I don't think we're ever going to see. But the hell sequence from Event Horizon, supposedly, yes, even Paul W. S. Anderson says that footage just gone. freakin gone. No one's get you know, I mean, with the Cabal cut for for Nightbreed. At least, you know, they were able to find it like on VHS. They're able to restore something. And I don't think that what Scream Factory put out is actually the Cabal cut it second director. Yeah, they were able to come up with something. But for event horizon, that stuff is gone. And that sucks. Because I think I speak for all three of us. I say we love event horizon. And we want more Event Horizon

Jonathan Correia:

at will more of those sequences, because those are the best parts of the movie. They're terrifying.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. Actually, you mentioned Nightbreed. And that is an interesting thing. Because, you know, the director's cut that Scream Factory did put out is one that Clive Barker approves. And that's that's his vision of it.

James Jay Edwards:

And it's a director's cut, but it's not the Cabal cut that people have been clamoring for

Jonathan Correia:

which I've seen the Cabal cut. It's a very interesting thing to watch the fun exercise, you know, kind of like Gus Van Sant's Psycho, I guess you know, its size, but it's kind of very clearly in and it's not just because the footage is ripped from a VHS. So visually, it's very different. But it's also kind of very, you can tell that these were deleted scenes like these were these were on the cutting floor for a reason, whether it be pacing or anything like that, but it's still very great to see and I wish they they were that screen factory did at least include those bits as special feature deleted scenes. But hey, that still is a great set that they put out, especially if you were able to get the limited set with the two disc of both guts. That's a musty.

James Jay Edwards:

I actually prefer the theatrical to the director's cut of Nightbreed myself

Jonathan Correia:

Blasphemy!

James Jay Edwards:

Well. That's the way it is Blasphemer! and this is coming from the guy who who thought the director's cut of Midsommar was better than the theatrical but I just think it's a more coherent movie. There's a lot of weird stuff in the directors. That doesn't make sense to me.

Jacob Davidson:

Similarly, I prefer the theatrical cut to the director's cut of William Peter Blatty is Excorcist 2, mostly because the theatrical cut actually has the exorcism.

Jonathan Correia:

And you know what's in its directors cut aren't always great. I mean, Donnie Darko, the director's cut explains way too much. And the theatrical guys a bit better for pacing. And I mean, you know, the theatrical cut of Army of Darkness is far more iconic than the director's cut. So I'm not saying that all directors that all studios are right, just, you know, case by case scenario, but it's still great to have that footage and to see, you know, the process and to see what goes into and what can change and for good or for worse, you know, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

speaking of like, something I would love to see, but I doubt we'll ever find it is the extended footage of Michael Mann's The Keep, because, you know, there was that whole thing with the battle with the studio where he wanted to do like, two hour plus version, and they just took it from his hands and edited down kind of haphazardly to just an hour and a half. And unfortunately, just you know, with the way the movie is, and kind of the, and, yeah, I feel like with the Paramount fire, just to kind of the way they dealt with the footage would probably never be found. But it sounded interesting. Cuz Yeah, it would have included more development and you know, would have explained a few more things, I guess. And there would have been a few more horrifying sequences with like, people under the monsters influence killing each other. But yeah, it's just one of those cases where we'll just, you know, like, it's only described on Wikipedia, you can find, like, half out there, you could just find like, weird VHS footage on YouTube. So you just so yeah, you know, it's kind of loss of time, unfortunately.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And then there's a lot of movies, especially out in the 80s, where as slashers were like, the kill bits and stuff are cut off. So a lot of like, Friday 13th from like four on when there was a lot of that backlash. We're starting to get more uncut versions of it with like, you know, an additional like, 30 seconds of footage for like the, you know, the piercing shots or what have you. I know My Bloody Valentine was another one that was heavily edited for violence, and then Lionsgate put out. You know, they put it back in, but they didn't do any restoration on it. So thank you screem factory for restoring that footage.

Jacob Davidson:

Mm hmm. But,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, it's

Jacob Davidson:

the long history of that. Yep. And yeah, there's a lot of those cases in the Friday the 13th, like, you know, from the box set like this, so many of them is. So many of the blu rays in that collection include the extended kill sequences and the violence that was cut out. And again, they did a great job restoring that, although Unfortunately, some of them's also kind of lost or just unable to be restored like Friday 13th, Part Seven, the new blood, like that one was heavily edited. And the footage, I think they were only able to find like the VHS or work, print cuts, the Egan watch, it's just not as great a quality. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

Have you guys heard about. It's a film that is lost purposely, at least for a while. It's called 100 Years. And it's a Robert Rodriguez movie that that he made, he made a short film and it stars It was written by and stars John Malkovich. And it's for some cognac company like Louis the 13th. cognac. And basically, the gimmick for it was they made it to be an advertisement for cognac. And the gimmick is each one of these bottles of cognac is aged for 100 years. So and I guess Robert Rodriguez didn't know they were gonna do this. But they he showed him this movie. And they said, yeah, that's the one that we're going to lock away for 100 years. He's all Say what? So there is a short film by Robert Rodriguez starring and written by john malkovich in a safe somewhere that is has a time lock that is not going to open until the year 2115. So, you know, maybe our grandkids will see it, if any of us ever have grandkids. But yeah, none of us are ever going to see this damn movie, because it's a gimmick that this cognac company did.

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know how how like, vested I am in actually seeing that short film. I'm kind of with that experiment more vested in seeing how much of an impact that will have in 2115. Because, you know, at that point, we'll it'll be twice the length of film history, or almost twice the length of film history that we have now. And we're still talking about directors like Millay, and Fritz Lang and all of them. So I wonder if like, basically, will john malkovich and Robert Rodriguez be relevant in the year 2115? Or will it or will they become relevant again, and then suddenly, people in 2115 are like, Whoa, yeah, we should watch more of these movies. What's, what's Being John Malkovich or what's his Sin City or Once Upon a Time in Mexico like that? That would be interesting to witness.

James Jay Edwards:

Here's something they may not have thought of what format did they put it in a safe hit? Because, I mean, because seriously, if you think 100 years ago, does anybody have, you know, a celluloid projector that will play, you know, you know, the silent movies that were lost in that fire? You know, if they put in, you know, like, it could be like an eight track player who's got an eight track player now? Well, I mean, if they put a D, is it a DVD?

Jonathan Correia:

Now, if they did it, right, it would be on 35 millimeter. And if it's kept at the right temperature, and you know, all that celluloid is meant to last at least 100 years, you know, if

James Jay Edwards:

unless you're smoking around it,

Jonathan Correia:

right, if you keep it in the proper, like environment and whatnot, which I'm sure if they're doing some, like, you know, promotion like that, that they they did everything to do that. But also good point, Are there going to be projectors that can play it then? Because Yeah, if you put that on digital at that thing will not be viewable in like, 10 years.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And then something else I want to talk about, do you know, just kind of how blessed we are to live in an era where this footage and these movies are being revitalized? Because, you know, for a long time, you know, a lot of these were kind of urban legends or, you know, just stuff that people talked about in the especially in horror, but you know, never would probably be able to experience like, the first example that comes to mind is like in Hellbound, Hellraiser 2 like, their the legendary last scene of pinhead and the cenobites dressed as surgeons. Because like, that was a big talking point and Fangoria for a long time. Like it comes up in a bunch of issues of the magazine. And yeah, eventually we were able to see that like, I think it's on the arrow, blu ray. But yeah, just, you know, that, that is the thing, you know, there was a, there was a long period of time where, especially in horror, because of the violence and gore and you know, attitudes at the time that that stuff was cut, and you know, it's just kind of stuff or fans would talk about over the campfire or something, you know, just like, oh, man, I heard they cut out this scene from Friday the 13th, Part Six, and then Oh, God, that had to be disgusting. You know that. That type of thing? Oh, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And well, we're living in like the golden age of restoration on these films. I mean, how often do we talk about Vinegar Syndrome, which I got my order, and I don't know about you guys, but it's not to rub it in. But I mean, we're getting restorations on these movies that probably some might have should have been lost to obscurity, but they're getting these amazing restorations. And these are entire films, and people are finding these bits. And what's also, I think, very interesting, is there's a lot of preservation that's happening digitally. Through bootleggers, I mean, there's a lot of movies that are in that gray area that people are restoring or holding on to. And with that, you know, they're they're gonna be able to be kept, but there's a lot that are still out there that need to be found. One of the saddest cases to me, at least as a big fan of early cinema is a lot of George ballets work is gone forever. Due to a fire. I think it was about 80 85% of his work, or even higher, gone, never to be seen again.

James Jay Edwards:

You guys know, Robert Flaherty who did Nanook of the North. He had basically hours and hours of footage that went up in a fire because he would smoke while he edited and his entire his entire room of footage, he had to start from scratch. I know a lot of Nanook of the North is staged. But you know, the fact that he basically had to start over from scratch when when he was in the editing process of his movie,

Jonathan Correia:

step outside, take the break when you're gonna smoke around, especially around nitrate, celluloid, like,

Jacob Davidson:

it's I don't know what he was thinking like that. Like, like he had to know the danger and he just did it anyway.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, yeah, this was the 20s or it might have even been the teens, you know, the, you know, 1918 1919 when he was because the Nook of the North was what 1922 So yeah, he, he may not have known the dangers, it was such a new medium.

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, they had to have known that nitrate was flammable though, right?

James Jay Edwards:

That's true. But also,

Jonathan Correia:

have you ever been in the editing room? Like I totally understand needing a constant stream of nicotine into one stream? Or bloodstream in the editing grow? One I definitely want to bring up is Ken Russell's The Devils

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Because that's such an interesting case. It pops up on Shudder. Every now and then which is fantastic. But it's a heavily edited movie, due to a very infamous scene known as the rape of Christ. And it's it's insane because there there is a cut. It's in a vault. It's at Warner Brothers, and yet they refuse to let it out to the point where when BFI released, released it years ago on DVD, they wouldn't let the restore to its full amount they could only use the British version of it. They which has more footage than the American one but They wouldn't let it be restored to be put out on blu ray only DVD. It's still a stacked DVD. I highly recommend it. But the weird thing is, is that the BBC did a documentary about The Devils and its controversy and and everything. And they show the full scene in the documentary it was and it was shown on public TV. Granted, it was a late night program. I think they premiered it at like 11pm. But still, like the footage exists. It's out there. I think you can find it on YouTube even. And it's been almost 50 years since this film came out. And yet they I don't know what it is with it, but they refuse to it. And yeah, I did someone on Twitter said What would you do if you were the head of Warner Brothers? I think they were trying to get a lot of the Snyder bros to get behind him be like I restored the Snyder verse. But all the film all the cinephiles were like, easy release The Devils. I was like, day one, release The Devils, day 2 greenlight Rampage 2 and three, four or five, you know, start the Rampage franchise.

James Jay Edwards:

Alright, let's wrap this up. But one that I want to bring up, which I brought up before is one that is lost purposely by the filmmaker. The Day the Clown Cried

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yes, I knew this was coming.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, of course I it's on my bucket list. And actually, now that it's in Library of Congress, I think are we in year three of the 10 year Wait, so it's gonna eventually I'm going to get to see it unless you know, I have a heart attack in the next seven years. But yeah, Jerry Lewis does not want this movie, or did not want this movie seen. Because basically, it's about a clown who leads kids to a Nazi death camp. And that's kind of all that's known, at least by me about it. So we'll uh, we'll see about that one.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

anyway, what have we forgotten? I mean, what films are so lost that we haven't even talked about them? What are your favorite lost films? What are ones you're dying to see? Let us know. And yeah, cuz we we. This is fascinating to me that stuff in this day and age can be lost. This Event Horizon one kills me because that footage, no one really no one has that footage. Anyway. So yeah, let us know what your favorites are and what you're looking for. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. I got my Restless Spirits and DMP merge in that I ordered from their from their Memorial Day Sale. It's awesome. I'm wearing my DMP shirt right now. So go check out Restless Spirits. artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go and give him a look in a shout. You can find us at the Eye On Horror Facebook page the Eye On Horror. Twitter, the Eye On Horror Instagram. The iHorror Facebook iHorror.com What else? I don't know. We're not hard to find. Yeah, can you can you can track us down easily. So let us know if you agree with our lost Movie choices if you don't, if you just don't like Death Metal Pope, you know, yell at me about wearing the shirt. We have thick skin. So yeah. Let us know what you think what's your favorite last movies are and we will see you in a couple weeks. So for me James Jay Edwards. I'm Jacob Davison and I'm Jonathan Correia. Keep your Eye On Horror.

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