Eye On Horror

Creepy Crawlies

June 06, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 10
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, the guys talk A Quiet Place Part II and Cruella before they engage in a fun discussion about creepy crawly movies.

Eye on Horror: Twitter / Instagram / Facebook

Correia: Twitter / Instagram

Jacob: Twitter / Instagram

Jay: Twitter / Instagram

iHorror: Twitter / Instagram / Facebook / Website

Mascot Loomis: Instagram

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror The official podcast of ihorror.com This is Episode 67 otherwise known as season four Episode 10. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always as your other host, Jacob Davison, how you doing? Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing good. It was my birthday.

James Jay Edwards:

Yay. Are you still fully bakst?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I am fully vaxxd and I had my birthday. It's the greatest gift of all.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm just busting your chops on the fully vaxxed because you gave me a hard time last week. Also with us yet again. Is your other other host Jon Correia. What's going on Korea?

Jonathan Correia:

Dude? Tired. So tired.

James Jay Edwards:

You had a big night last night?

Jonathan Correia:

I had a big day yesterday. not as big as Jacob. Jacob had his birthday weekend. Why am I the tired one? It's your birthday weekend and we were expecting you to come in and rough shape. Not me.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, honestly. I'm just as surprised as you are. Yeah, last night that I went to a private screening. It was supposed to be Jaws 2 but due to technical difficulties. It was Alien.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm so sorry. You had to settle for Aliens

James Jay Edwards:

settle. I mean, that's an upgrade.

Jacob Davidson:

was his birthday roast. But yeah, no does it is and it is always a blast. To see Alien on 35mm.

James Jay Edwards:

Is it safe to say I'm gonna I'm gonna go out on a limb here is your favorite movie of all time? Jaws?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I would say if not my absolute favorite. It's pretty high up there.

James Jay Edwards:

So jaws two might be above alien.

Jacob Davidson:

No

James Jay Edwards:

on your rankings of stuff?

Jacob Davidson:

No, it isn't.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, that's interesting.

Jacob Davidson:

I do love jaws too in its own way. But alien is alien.

James Jay Edwards:

Here's a question for for both of you. Alien or aliens.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, the age old question.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, at least 40 years old.

James Jay Edwards:

For me, it's alien.

Jonathan Correia:

It depends on the mood, man. It's like

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, I'm with

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, it's it's like it's like it's like Who do you like more your mom or your dad? It's like well, you know, like what is once fun and once going to help fix my car. You know? I need my car fixed. I need to call my mom. No. But But you know, it's it's a mood, you know, I feel for because they're both fantastic films. But like, Alien. He got this beautiful Lovecraftian cosmic horror, mixed with like claustrophobia and stuff. And then aliens is just balls to the wall. It's badass. It's got Bill Paxton. Yes, I watched Twister again this week. So I'm on a Paxton kick

Jacob Davidson:

Lance henriksen

Jonathan Correia:

Lance henriksen like that fucking cast dude.

Jacob Davidson:

Alien also has a pretty stacked cast. Two. I mean, when we were watching it, we applauded the entire cast list because you got Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, john hurt and home yaphet Cotto,

James Jay Edwards:

Veronica Cartwright,

Jacob Davidson:

Monica Cartwright and

James Jay Edwards:

Harry Dean Stanton. You leave him for last?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, just all seven all standouts

James Jay Edwards:

when yaffa koto passed earlier this year, I was thinking I'm like, you know, that's four Nostromo crew members we've lost in the last few years because Harry Dean Stan Ian home yaphet. Cotto and john hurt all passed within the last few years. So yeah, look both ways. Tom Skerritt. And watch your cholesterol Sigourney Weaver.

Jonathan Correia:

I know I've mentioned it before, but have you guys watched the alien documentary Memory: Origins of Alien even if you don't like alien, which, who are you? What's wrong with you who hurt you? But it's it's an absolutely phenomenally made documentary. That's really that's it's one of the few that really like get into, like, critical analysis. So I respect the shit out of that doc.

James Jay Edwards:

Cool. I can tell you guys, the reason I got vaccinated has come to fruition this last week, I saw A Quiet Place Part Two in a theater. It was a 25% capacity theater. It was a press screening, although it was open to promo people to which we talked about last time, but um, it was a you know, 25% capacity theater, and it was awesome. I loved it. It's not quite as dependent on the silent sound gimmick as the other one which is kind of good, I think because that would have gotten really old. Um, the world opens up a lot more. So there's more opportunities for sound. And the theater they showed it to us in was a was a Dolby Atmos theater. So when the monsters jump and land your seat would like you know, rattle on like, really in a quiet place. I'm doing this. But also Milko Marco beltrami score. Yeah, he went off. It's almost like he has something to prove. Because he did the score for the first one to which was much more minimal. And now he's like all you know, it's like they took the reins off. They're like, write some music. And he's like, say no more.

Jonathan Correia:

Dude, that score will just come in. And it's like, I was not expecting something that intense. Yeah. And I thought it was great. I'm not as big of a fan of the quiet place franchise as you but I really I'm a huge fan of world building. And so like the first movie where there's like, a lot of those little moments like oh, they're using soft piece, you know, felt pieces for monopoly and stuff that world building i thought was phenomenal. But seeing how people who you really by by them leaving the valley, you really got to see how much of a bubble they were living in in that valley because everyone else they're not trying to be quiet. They're trying to weaponize sound to fuck over other humans with the monsters is what primarily everyone else was doing, which was insane. Oh, I

Jacob Davidson:

haven't seen yet so careful on spoilers. Oh,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, you definitely don't want to spoil it. We might have to do a spoilery bonus episode or something to talk once we've all seen it. They talked about that last scene, because I really, really, really, really want to talk about that final scene, but you can't without spoiling it. And Korea knows. I mean, he's nodding his head like Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. It's It's It's just a masterclass of filmmaking. Kaczynski is the real deal, dude. I mean, I'm impressed with these guys who started in comedy. You know, Jordan Peele, john Krasinski, who are able to make the and I know we've discussed before, it's a similar timing, but um, man, he's, he knows what he's doing behind the camera.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I, my, my, the main thing I enjoyed the most was that the main focus of the film was on the daughter, like, because she, she was great. I thought the story there was absolutely phenomenal. It tied really well into a lot of the themes and with the relationship with the Father, really well. And from the first movie, the other two family mother members, I didn't really particularly care what was happening with them, the mom and the son like he almost felt like you could have like, kind of cut their storyline out and wouldn't have missed much.

James Jay Edwards:

I know what your say, Noah Jupe was a little annoying. The boy the son little,

Jonathan Correia:

just just a little bit.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, but but if you think about it, put into that situation. At that age,

Jonathan Correia:

I would have been annoying to I would have been annoying at this age in that situation. But that was one of the things is that it was just like, it's not like they spent a lot of time with them. You know, the most of the focus was on the daughter and her journey and whatnot. So that's great. But yeah, it's one thing I really respected. We said with the quiet thing, I really liked how they did shift the sound perspective of from characters through touch there was that they didn't overuse that gimmick too much. But I really dug how there would be the moments where we would go into her sound perspective, and then someone would like grab her hand or something to start running. And they would immediately shift sound focus and

James Jay Edwards:

or what's fun about that is like, the sound would be normal. And then she'll take her hearing aid out, and all of a sudden, you're in her perspective. I mean, it's just really well done. Now they did things like that.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I'll probably be seeing it tomorrow.

James Jay Edwards:

Right on so we could talk more about it in the future.

Jonathan Correia:

Maybe we'll do a quick episode later in the week. Just add

James Jay Edwards:

just to spoil it for people and I can talk about that last scene. Yeah. Also, and this is a little less horror, but I think it still is going to be applicable. And I know Correia saw to Cruella

Jonathan Correia:

Cruella is The reason why I'm fucking dead tired. It's two hours and 15 minutes long. Let's sanding. The screening started at 1130 oh my god with trailers. And listen, I love mission Tiki mission Tiki, I love you so much. Thank you for being open for the past year. But please stop showing that out of de COVID video before each screening. Holy crap. It's so annoying. It's like 15 minutes long, but yeah. Corella, so many opinions on that man. So many opinions.

James Jay Edwards:

It's weird because it um, someone was

Jonathan Correia:

Man. Could you imagine if that film was like, trolling the IMDb I don't know if it's still like this. But um, the other day I looked at it was when I was writing my review for it would have worked. it. And I looked at the parents guide for Cruella and it said

James Jay Edwards:

It is. I mean, it is a villainous and the it's rated PG 13. And it said sex and nudity. None. Okay, that's correct. But then it said, violence and gore, severe profanity, severe drugs and smoking severe frightening and attempt scenes severe. What movie do these people watch? thing is, the interesting thing is yes, it's one of the most Because that's not Cruella. iconic Disney Villains but she's not the villain in this movie. It's an origin story and she's a pretty sympathetic character. Once you get rolling Emma Thompson's character is more of a villain.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, she's she's kind of an anti hero with like villainous tendencies more than anything,

James Jay Edwards:

because she's still a criminal. So she's not really for lack of a better word, she's not really likable, although she is likable and she's sympathetic because it shows you why she is how she is, which is cool. But what I love most about Cruella every scene has this awesome note, perfect needle drop. The soundtrack is incredible. And it's not just picking pop songs. The music supervisor is the woman who did American Hustle, which also had a bunch of note perfect needle drops in it as well, either. One of the songs they put in towards the beginning is the Rolling Stone. She's a rainbow. And when they're playing that song, you're like, yeah, that's that's the perfect song for this point movie. And then later on, they do they drop. I want to be your dog. And I won't spoil the context.

Jonathan Correia:

This is the best scene in the movie.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. And also, you know it for the primary villain and 101 Dalmatians, you can kind of guess that there is context. But that's another one of those. Nope, perfect. And it's everything from the zombies to Blondie. I mean, there's not really a specific genre that they dropped from, but I mean, it's it's a music historians dream.

Jonathan Correia:

I really loved the just the whole idea of this anarchistic fashionista, just like kind of be terrorizing this, Baroness. That's the that's the that's the movie. And, and I and I thought they executed those parts Really? Well. I really loved what they did. They took these one dimensional Stooges that she had in the original movies, Jasper and Horace and they, they really developed them, which kind of makes it really sad, because in the animated movie, they're very one dimensional. And I think the live action too. And I'll admit, I don't know my 101 Dalmatians too well, but like just thinking of these very well rounded characters becoming one dimensional goons later. It's like, what the fuck happened between this movie and that movie? Like, did they get that demoralized? And they kind of show that a little bit in this? There's a lot of camp in this movie, but I felt not enough because if you think about it, the whole concept Yeah, let's do an origin story for a woman who wants to murder over 100 puppies. That sounds like something like John Waters would have jokingly said in an interview in the 90s and I'm not saying it needed to go full John Waters, but I needed I needed more flamboyant camp in that movie. Like it was just enough. I will say the star of the film is Winky. He's this one eyed eyepatch wearing ciao. And when that little fucker comes out in a rat costume during one of the bits, he stole my heart.

Jacob Davidson:

It does sound adorable.

James Jay Edwards:

It's funny because that, and this happens in the first scene. And I'm not I'm still not going to spoil it. But it shows you basically the biggest formative part of her origin story in the first scene, and in particular, why she has a vendetta against Dalmatians.

Jonathan Correia:

And that's, that's one of the things people are most like, I we don't need to spoil it. But it's already been spoiled, like, that's all people are complaining about is like, oh, you're doing that with the dalmations. And like, you know, that's where I feel like the tone of Camp could have it could the film could have really benefited because there's some really ridiculous things where if it was just a bit campier, it would have been a lot of fun and would have kind of made more sense. But I definitely was sitting there, especially early in the movie just kind of being like, stop trying to make the whole Dalmatians thing happen in this.

James Jay Edwards:

They played it very seriously. I mean, even the incident that we're talking about, it's not played casually. It's it's not played for camp. It is it's very serious. And it's actually kind of a horrifying scene, and then they throw back to it towards the end. And it kind of becomes a little more campy. Because you're it's one of those outcome on occasion. But the thing is, you mentioned the running time, two hours in 14 minutes. I do think it felt a little long, but I don't know what I would have taken out. You know, I think it was about 20 minutes too long. But what 20 minutes, would you take out? I don't I can't think of any

Jonathan Correia:

if anything I want I wanted like it's like, yes, runtime I was so I was Yeah, it's long. But I wanted more. I wanted more Artie, especially because arties like, there was a whole thing about already being like the first openly queer character in a Disney movie, which has been said dozens of times, and

Jacob Davidson:

they keep on doing that.

Jonathan Correia:

They keep doing it. But they didn't say anything that would make them open. You know, he was very flamboyant and stuff. But like I wanted more of him. He was he was a really interesting character. And they had these great scenes where Cruella comes into a shop and they just kind of like get real sassy with each other. And I was like, Yeah, but that's all they did with him. He she came into a shop twice. They had a sassy exchange, and then he would make some clothes. And then he had like one other bit at the end and I'm like, dude, he had like five or seven minutes of screen time. I wanted more already because he was cool. He had this like bow we looked to him like spiders from Mars era. The

James Jay Edwards:

only thing I think they could have shortened is it They shortened some of the musical montage is, but like I said, those are the best parts of the movie. So don't take those out. Yeah, I we've talked enough about Cruella considering it's borderline. I mean, you can call it fringe horror because it is niche genre. It's Yeah. And and it's and it's a pretty important villain. But what else he hasn't seen?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I saw the new Simon merit movie sounds I was I can't wait to see it. How is it all it was so much fun? Yeah, so it's basically your kind of girls Academy horror movie, where it's about, like this prestigious girls Academy where there's like this local ghost story and one of the preppy girls dies under mysterious circumstances. Just as this new student played by Suki Waterhouse comes in, and like the popular girls click is just like bullying her. And they start dying one by one. And yeah, we got to figure out what's going on. And this being Simon Barrett, you know, the guy who wrote Your Next and The Guest. And this is this is his directorial debut. You know, he does a really great job of subverting expectations and kind of messing with, like, how you think the story is going to go or like what or who the characters are.

James Jay Edwards:

There's a poster for Seance that I love where it's on, everybody's hands on the table for a seance and one of the pairs of hands is our skeleton hands.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, so hands.

James Jay Edwards:

That's such a great poster for a movie like that. So I can't wait to see it.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, highly recommended.

James Jay Edwards:

I saw um, I got a screener for it's coming out on Shudder. It'll probably hit Shudder The day after this episode posts, but the amusement park that last George Romero film, and it is it's basically what happened is he was commissioned in 73. So this is the same year he did the crazy. So you know, he wasn't quite a horror icon, but he definitely he had made Night of the Living Dead. And he, you know, people knew what he was about. He was commissioned to make a movie about elder abuse by the Lutheran Society of Western Pennsylvania. So he makes this movie about an old man who goes to an amusement park, and terrible things happen to this old man. And it's all a metaphor for life in general, like he's going through metaphors of like how old people have to deal with nursing homes and hospitals and law enforcement and all and it's, I mean, for 1973 it's pretty disturbing. It's pretty tame by today's standards. But then when you think about it, this is made as basically like a PSA. And it clearly it seems like one of those films they would put on when you were in I mean, I'm a little older new guys, but movies they would put on in a classroom, you know, when the teacher wanted to doze off for 45 minutes, so they put a film on it. Look, it seems like one of those. It even has like a at the beginning the guys like Oh, the older people in the world, blah, blah, blah, you know, it has like a, like a prelude at the beginning. It's clearly a made for TV PSA only made for TV by George Romero. But it's real experimental and abstract. And it's short, it's only 52 minutes clearly made to fit in an hour time slot on TV, you know, on a TV station, but apparently when the Lutheran society saw it, they never aired it. Because they thought it was they thought it was a little too shocking. I don't know what they thought they were gonna get from George Romero. But it's been shelved until a few years ago someone found a print and the George A Romero foundation restored it and it's going on Shudder so you'll be able to see it. Yeah, it's a it's a pretty crazy, you know, if you're a Romero fan, it's kind of essential to see because you can see bits of his early movies you know, bits of Martin and the crazies in it. But yeah, it's a it's a cool it's it's almost like it seems like a lost student film of Romero's because it was also made in a shoestring budget with all volunteer actors and crew. So go but as you guys been watching,

Jonathan Correia:

well, I've been watching a lot of non horror stuff, but I did get really into this video game. It's on discount, right? Well, when we're recording, but it's called Night Trap. It's a remaster reissue of this game that came out in 1993. It was one of the first video games to use actual people. What is it?

Jacob Davidson:

FMV like the full motion video, like with live action actors.

Jonathan Correia:

There you go. FMV and it's, it's really cool. It's it's kind of like the original Five Nights at Freddy's. So the whole plot. It's wierd it's a B movie, you're basically involved in a B movie. It's this group of kids that go to this house to party. And there's a government SWAT type team that are investigating because people are going missing around the house. And it turns out that the owners of the house are these toothless vampires with green glowing eyes.

James Jay Edwards:

And wait hold on toothless vampires.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, oh dude, it's a it's a really interesting story actually,

James Jay Edwards:

really hard, I think to get blood out of you here to the spam.

Jonathan Correia:

So what they do is they argue like blood out of people. So there's one scene where they they take one of the SWAT guys and they hang them up in a closet and they stick a needle in his neck and they suck the blood out into wine bottles. Because originally the game was developed for Nintendo and Nintendo had this I don't know if they still have this policy, but they had this policy where I need violence is that's in your video game had to be non replicable. So that's why Mario jumps on goobers heads, and stuff like that. So they couldn't have any violence happen in this horror game that could be replicated by a kid. So that's why you have toothless vampires that you know, and they have like a club thing. It's these goofy guys in black suits. But the whole point of the game is you're in control of the security system of the house. So you're watching all this through security cams, and you can trigger traps to capture the oculars there is what the bad guys are called in it. And so while you're like looking through this is the movie is playing out complete with you know, sort of girls in their in their nightclothes dancing, the music was, you know, super, it's super 80s I think it was shot in like 87 or something like that. But it's it's really cool. And this reissued they, because it was originally came out on the Sega CD ROM so it was super pixelated, you know, really cheeky. They remastered it. So you get to see the actual footage in the game, the layout is updated and looks better. It comes with special features. So you can learn about the history of the game and the controversy because it was one of the main games that they focused on. During the like 95 Congress hearings about violence in video games, it was like that in Mortal Kombat. And they were saying like, this game promotes kids to murder and rape. And it's like, no, the whole point of the game is to save people. And it's because of this one scene where this girl gets captured by Oculus in a bathroom, but there's no blood, you don't get to see like anyone really die in it. But like, yeah, it's it's a really interesting gem. And it's a lot of fun. I think like if you actually make it through to the end of the game, it's like 25 minutes. But there's all these scenes that are happening on and they really do a good job of like, making it so that you can read there's replay value, you know, they have like different interactions, you can play it on the original 93 interface or the 97 rerelease or the updated 2017 I think I spent like seven bucks on it. And it was worth every penny

James Jay Edwards:

said I was gonna ask how replayable is if the if the entire game is only like 25 minutes? Can you do it multiple times and still have fun?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, cuz there's, there's a bunch of different scenes going on. If you go on YouTube, you can look up, people have taken the scenes from the game and like strung it together into like a, like a somewhat coherent story. So you can watch it like a B movie. And it is entertaining. It's super cheesy, it's a bit over the top. But like what they did is pretty crazy. And like, like I said, there's special features. They have documentaries interviews, they actually have if you get a perfect score, you can unlock a demo where they first tested out the technology and it was like a who broke into a safe scenario but it was like a similar formula where like you're using the security cams to watch people they didn't have traps in that one but it was like scene of the crime. I think it's called but I mean, if you can get it for under 10 bucks it's totally worth it. It's on switch. It's on ps4 and PC like

Jacob Davidson:

ironic it made it back onto the onto Nintendo.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And they sent it the Congress hearings, Nintendo's you know, standards would never allow this type of game to be on it ever. It's like Well, here we are. 25 years later.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's like I just said before, you know, pretty tame by today's standards,

Jonathan Correia:

and it was pretty tame by them standards. It was just the fact that like these people in Congress, like look at this video game where these guys in the in like they're showing like the super pixelated thing. And it's like, all it shows is this is this guy getting grabbed with like a claw device around her neck and then being pulled off screen. Like this game is promoting. And they're putting it like next to shots of Mortal Kombat where it's like Mortal Kombat violent and bloody but like this game is not it's it's you're you're just sitting there triggering traps.

Jacob Davidson:

I saw an Army of the Dead at the driving last week.

James Jay Edwards:

At the driving. It's It's It's on. It's on Netflix now. Right?

Jacob Davidson:

Correct. Yeah. Okay, Netflix thing. Um,

James Jay Edwards:

but it is showing in theaters or?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's also showing in theaters. Yeah, just, you know, I wasn't sure you know, how many more times would be able well, or you know, like with with theaters reopening, I wasn't sure how often I'm able to go back to the drive and so I figured why not? And it actually was kind of a fun driving type of movie because it's very Grindhouse ish. It's a very over the top movie, which of course, you know, it's multimillion dollar Zack Snyder film so you get what you pay for.

James Jay Edwards:

But I've heard and I haven't seen it, but I've heard that the camera work is almost blurry. How did it look on a big screen?

Jacob Davidson:

Not too bad. Oh, don't say it was blurry.

James Jay Edwards:

But I mean that's kind of part of his aesthetic anyway. I mean, if you look at like Sucker Punch or Dawn of the Dead they're almost soft focus in parts anyway, so it's kind of part of his aesthetic, I think.

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I've been like that. But yeah, I mean, this this is pretty. I mean, it was pretty fun. I mean, it's done mindless fun. Because you know, I got Dave Bautista and all these people pulling a heist and zombie apocalyptic Las Vegas. Although I have to say probably my favorite part. And this is come up like the like the opening prologue, which is like 15 minutes long is one of the most interesting parts of the movie because it shows you how the zombie apocalypse starts and like, how it hits Vegas, and he does that thing he kind of like what he did and on to the dead where it's set to a I believe his name is Richard cheese. You know, the lounge singer does covers of other music people equal shit. Exactly. So they did so yeah, it's another Richard g style opening with zombie apocalypse kicking off and just non stop violence and gore is Las Vegas is overrun. And, and yeah, that's and that's the best part is that it? That whole clip of the whole prologue is free on YouTube. So you can just watch that.

James Jay Edwards:

Did you say it's 15? One, five or 15

Jacob Davidson:

minutes? Okay, the movies two and a half hours long?

James Jay Edwards:

I thought you said 50 at first minutes. Among all that's a prologue.

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I mean, I would not be surprised but no, no. The prologue in this case is only 15 minutes long.

James Jay Edwards:

Now the Snyder cut has a 15 minute long promo

Jacob Davidson:

I can only imagine. Um, but yeah, I mean, in the rest of the movies, okay. I mean, yeah, just it just kind of drags in certain parts. It's like, yeah, like when there's like when they're fighting zombies. It's cool. Just say there's a few bits where it's kind of meandering. And you know, just we're just here for the action.

James Jay Edwards:

They did a similar thing for Dawn of the Dead i remember when it came out in what was it 2004 they released that opening scene ahead of the movie to sell it I don't know if it was on YouTube or where it was but they did release that opening scene and people went nuts for it and that sold the movie because the opening scene did that Dawn of the Dead is incredible. So Oh yeah, it's horrifying yeah

Jacob Davidson:

sick it's a good part and then it goes into Johnny Cash is when the man comes around, because I got to give Zack Snyder credit because he is a master of needle drops. He really knows what kind of music to use and when to use it.

Jonathan Correia:

It's very reliant on it

Jacob Davidson:

that is also true. Like I'm

Jonathan Correia:

not I'm not against Zack Snyder but like I don't get excited about it but if I do end up watching army of the dead soon it's for two reasons Tig Nataro and Junkie XL score.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah. Now those are two big factors taken uttara scenes are some of the best and she always stands out and yeah you know just said just wanted to see something fun and you know, something kind of Grindhouse he had the driving and it kind of fit fit that I mean, I yeah, that's the thing. Like I thought I thought the movie was okay, but you know, it was fun to watch, but I'm probably not going to rewatch it anytime soon. That's the thing like they're trying to franchise it now. Like they're already making plans on like, sequel or spin offs or something.

James Jay Edwards:

Navy of the dead. T

Jonathan Correia:

Marines of the Dead

Jacob Davidson:

Space force of the dead. Oh, that's a good one.

James Jay Edwards:

Instead of Army of the dead dead, the leggy of the dead. The leggy, you know, arm leg?

Jacob Davidson:

Ah,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, that's

Jacob Davidson:

terrible.

James Jay Edwards:

Bad. Yeah, it's horrible. Okay, let's move on. What's

Jonathan Correia:

our main topic?

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, we're, let's move on to the topic. And this was inspired by the mid Middle East Coast being overrun by how do you say it cicadashas stuck out his little

Jonathan Correia:

cicadas,

James Jay Edwards:

cicadas, cicadas

Jonathan Correia:

cicadas, cicadas

James Jay Edwards:

how you say cicadas these those annoying bugs. That sounds like I've been hearing people complaining that burglar alarms in businesses are going off but it's actually these damn bugs. So we started thinking about our favorite creepy crawly movies.

Jonathan Correia:

Well good cicadas are intense because they they they basically go into hibernation for years right and then they come out in a giant apocalyptic swarm. Yeah, we're talking billions with a be like they fully just like, aren't there for years and also they It's huge. There's just like billions of them and all they do is eat and fuck and then suddenly there

James Jay Edwards:

and make noise apparently

Jacob Davidson:

and leave billions of cicadas, cicadas shells. Yeah, I've seen those pictures just like the like just wall to wall carpet of cicada shells from molting.

Jonathan Correia:

It's It's insane. I remember when I was a kid. We were driving cross country, you know, family. Trip fun times Correia vacation but like I remember that was during a cicada season and we're going through like you know corn country and all sudden we just went through a swarm and I thought the truck was gonna break down because it's just Ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba ba every it was it was worse than a hailstorm. It was insane. And then there was just like, dead bug all over the car.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, yep. Enemy we're getting into summer so the This feels pretty timely, because you know, it's a buggy season. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

that's gonna be scarier than anything we discuss from here on out but let's talk creepy crawly movies. What are your guys's favorites?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I got I got one to start. I want to start okay. Because one of my favorites is this is one of my favorite movies in general. Dario Argento's Phenomena, aka Creepers, creepers. Yes. Yeah. And you know, and on a personal level, this is my favorite Dario Argento movie because it's just his whole filmography in one movie you got you got the Giallo elements. You got the supernatural elements. You got animals. You got a girls school, you got the Goblin score, you know, it's just everything I could want in one dari Argento movie. And yeah, no, they Oh, yeah. And this, and this is heavy on the creepy crawlies. Alright, you know, to the point that the American cut was called creepers. And yeah, so it's basically about Jennifer Connelly, who's characters actually named Jennifer, who goes to this prestigious Swiss girls school. And there's a killer going around, killing girls at the school and people in the Swiss Alps. But she has a superpower, she has the ability to communicate with insects. So she teams up with Donald Pleasance is this wheelchair bound entomologist, who's kind of like her Professor X. So it's like a Carrie except instead of telekinesis, and from things around, you can just summon swarms of bugs whenever she's agitated, like there's this great scene where like, all the other girls in the girl school are just bullying the hell out of her and just like cornering her. And so she summons like a swarm of insects that shroud the school. And there's this gray kind of light light a chat where Laker hair blows back. And all the other students are just freak the fuck out. Yeah, and is and also this is the ad so like, there's no CG, this is just like 1000s and 1000s of flies and insects are just thrown around

James Jay Edwards:

when I was growing up in the 70s there were a bunch of buy a bunch of there were probably two or three, but to my, you know, little head there, it was a bunch of killer b movies, and they were TV movies that would show on you know, like ABC or NBC This is even before VCR so you know, be watch these movies. And I remember you know these, I thought they were kind of far fetched. But then one day I was at the library at school and I was and I found a book on killer bees. I'm like, Oh, cool. So I start reading it and all of a sudden it said this one line about at the rate they are traveling the killer bees will reach the United States by 1990. And my blood ran cold. I'm not gonna wait, these things are real. I honestly thought that killer bees were a Hollywood invention. I didn't realize that, you know, Africanized bees were in South America working their way up. And I was terrified. Like, that was my big phobia for probably the next 12 years was killer bees cut, you know, and I had like dreams where they would come over this hill that was by my house, and I would all of a sudden see them coming and oh, horrifying.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no. And actually, that's the thing like that. And the fear just kind of kept going. Because like when I was growing up, they also there was also a lot of buzz about killer bees eventually spreading out for the United States. And I think Yeah, I feel like it's one of those things that was probably just overblown because I mean, yeah, there were cases of killer bees in places but they weren't nearly as invasive as they were made out to be or they were easier to control. Because Yeah, like, I don't know, like, either there were news reports or like, TV specials badly that killer views are coming. Well, the fact that they call them the killer bees

James Jay Edwards:

and not just Africanized honeybees says, Oh, yeah, he sensationalize it. It's probably a lot like, you know, because supposedly jaws is based on a real story of a rogue shark who attacked a few people. So all of a sudden, you know, people are afraid to go in the water. It's like shark attacks are not that common. killer bees are not that big of a threat. But to my child mind, you know, I'd seen these couple of TV movies have killer reads attacking school buses and stuff. And then when I find out they're real, it scarred me if

Jacob Davidson:

Funny enough, I was just reading a report the other day that cows killed more people each year than sharks. So think about that.

Jonathan Correia:

That's why we need to eat every single cow.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, if you don't eat the cows, the cows can eat you belly. Exactly.

Jonathan Correia:

Now, one of my favorites growing up of creepy crawly movies is Arachnophobia.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yes,

Jonathan Correia:

yes. That's one of those movies. It I think it's that in Good Burger. I have to attribute to my person to my whole personality just tone and everything I think is it comes down to those two films. But Arachnophobia is just like one of the most Pitch Perfect horror comedies and the special effects that was like during that era were like Frank Darabont and Robert Zumeckis make us and then we're just like pushing the limits on practical and computer effects like mixing them together not being super reliant on one or the other but like a top notch john Goodman's absolutely phenomenal and just being like the funniest grossest

Jacob Davidson:

he's awesome as the exterminator.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh man but then there's like some really genuine like freaky scenes with like, when people are get caught in webs and stuff like in like the shots of like, the trees being covered in it. That's still like whenever I see that in real life, the trees covered in cobwebs. It just brings back that like terror of like, Oh, no, here they come like

Jacob Davidson:

and like the thing that's still just like really traumatized me was the spider egg sack you know that just that horrible giant pulsing, like spider egg nest this oh my god, that was just nightmare fuel.

Jonathan Correia:

It's the pulsing that gets it that makes it so much worse.

James Jay Edwards:

I have a friend who saw Arachnophobia in the theaters and she was on vacation visiting family in I it was like rural Pennsylvania or maybe West Virginia somewhere up in that area. And none of her family found arachnophobia. Scary, because that was a Tuesday where they were from you know, it wasn't that big of a deal that all these spiders were around. But if you're not used to that kind of thing, spiders are the worst. They're worse than killer bees.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, like I used to visit my uncle and like he lived in kind of a rural part of Pennsylvania and yeah, there were a lot of spiders everywhere

Jonathan Correia:

but spiders are needed. You know, spiders and bees are so important to the ecosystem. Oh yeah, make the honey and Panay and spiders they eat the fate that not so great creepy crawlies. Like, remember guys just be friendly to the bees and the the spiders out there tarantulas. They look scary, but they're just they're just tiny puppies with lots of legs.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I got friends who own pet tarantula and they're they're nice as hell.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. A couple weeks ago, I found a spider in my front yard who had a cockroach trapped in his web. And I I if I had seen his hand I would a high five don't keep doing that

Jonathan Correia:

fucking hard core

James Jay Edwards:

if you can keep killing cockroaches you can stay there as long as you want spider.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, buddy. Speaking of cockroaches Have you guys ever seen The Nest?

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

that's that's a wild one that would

Jonathan Correia:

I threw on I thought it was gonna be like a fun background movie. And it I got no work done that afternoon is that it's so cheesy, but it's so much fun. And like wasn't there like a bit towards the end where it was like a half cockroach

Jacob Davidson:

cockroach? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I think I just remember it being so goopy.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, a lot of goop effects.

Jonathan Correia:

That that was a fun movie. And that one made me like it made my skin crawl just because like all the cockroaches and stuff like, like that short in Creepshow.

James Jay Edwards:

I was just gonna say speaking of half cockroach half people. That's that one. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

they're creeping up on you that which, personally I think you know, it's always hard to pick one but I think that might be my favorite. Creep show short short in the movie. And because you know, it's because it works. Somebody loves and it's George Romero. He co wrote that story and he directed it as a as eg martial as like this. agoraphobic, germaphobic racist, rich dude who lives in like this airtight, condo or whatever. And like he's obsessed with germs and insects, and like he refused to leave his apartment, but it's slowly becoming encroached by, like just an endless wave of cockroaches and like I listened to an interview with Romero and he was saying, you know, like that was, you know, like, morality tale you know, was you know, his his racism coming back to bite him because like he kept on going on and on about germs and insects, but it's actually yeah, it's like ups and Pratt is just a racist asshole.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it was a not so subtle metaphor for racist views. Is is definitely opinions on insects and stuff like that, in particular, short in Creepshow. They're creeping up on you was just so it really does get under your skin. It gets very uncomfortable with what they do with the cockroaches, how many there were and the effects were really cool like that whole bit where he's getting like, drowning in cockroaches. It's just such an uncomfortable scene and then it just shows him in his body AC one come out of his mouth, and then they just start coming out of everything.

James Jay Edwards:

And they were real cockroaches. These these were not CG Yo, cockroaches this poor guy had to deal with that. Have you guys seen Phase IV?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, I love Phase IV

James Jay Edwards:

it's a it's kind of like science fictiony. But there's like some cosmic event that made ants it gives them like basically a universal hive mind. So ants start working together to take over the planet.

Jonathan Correia:

And they could.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, that's another crazy one. Because it's basically the heroes if you want to call them that are a couple of scientists in this, you know, bunker, and they can see what the ants are doing. But they can't do anything about it. Because it's being over, you know, they're trying to fight these ants, but, you know, they're losing.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's a it's like one of those very clinical 70 sci fi type of movies where, you know, they're observing them. And they kind of have a philosophical and moral debate on like, whether they should kill them because, you know, they could be as it looks like they're turning or evolving into a sentient species. And yeah, it's very enthralling, and it's kind of trippy it was directed by Saul Bass. made his famous as a poster artist.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. Or title sequence designer for all

Jacob Davidson:

right, right. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And, and yeah, it's very hypnotic, especially because it has this really trippy synth score for the entire movie actually got on vinyl. And yeah, it's really good. But yeah, no, that's a fake. It's like it's, they're not the ants don't look any different. They don't, they're not bigger. And you know, they're not giving any really, you know, defining physical, you know, looks but, you know, just these ants are really, really smart. And, and like, they got like these terrorist structures, like instead of Anheuser got like skyscraper hives, and one of the scientists starts to go crazy. Because the idea of ants, you know, an evolving humanity just kind of starts to drive him insane.

James Jay Edwards:

That's kind of like a feature length episode of The Twilight Zone.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

yeah. Because there's there's a little moral to the story as well,

Jonathan Correia:

adding to cart.

James Jay Edwards:

Make sure you get the 70s one though, because they remade it with Dean Cain in like, 2002. Yeah. Oh, get make sure that you get the original bisol Bass one.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And back on cockroaches. You know, I was thinking back to Yeah, kind of my own kind of Kindred trauma. And the one I keep going back to in the 90s is Mimic from Guillermo del Toro, because man, that movie messed me up. Because you know, it's like this. Okay, so like this new disease is being spread throughout Manhattan by cockroaches. So in order to kill cockroaches, the scientists create a new species of insect that will hunt down and kill the other cockroaches, but they only have like a shelf life of like 30 days or something. But of course, as these things tend to go, science goes awry. And the insects the Judas breed that they sent to kill the cockroaches evolved to a point where they start mimicking humans. And you know, though Toro just really knows how to like it there's there's kind of like an almost a dark fantasy element to it, because he also got this kid who starts following like, one of one of the big bugs and and would really mess me up though, is that, you know, Guillermo del Toro does not shy from killing off kids and his movies. So like, when I saw it, I was pretty young. And you know, there's a scene where like, these two kids who were like tracking down some of the remains of the bugs to sell to the scientists, they run into one. And there's this horrible scene where the Judas bog like kills one of the kids and like, one of the other kids actually falls to a finger bar bar and like the just the bug descends on him and you think, oh, he's got to get away or something. Right. And no, no, they do not get away. Oh, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And that's one of those movies. It was, it was released by it The Weinstein Company and they just like kind of chopped it too bit. So if you're going to seek out mimic, seek out the director's cut. I think that's the only version on blu ray now, but the director's cut really, like makes it much more watchable. Now, we're talking a lot about average size bugs, but what about giant bugs? Let's talk about Them! the ultimate or making things bigger than they should be? Well, I mean, next to Rampage,

Jacob Davidson:

you know, rampage job. Yeah. I mean, you got to, I mean, yeah, rampage, of course. But then, honestly, one of the scenes that really got to me from that movie, and they did a kind of classic horror marathon at the Egyptian a couple years back, and then was one of them. So I was cool. I got to see it on the big screen for the first time.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. It was a great

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, right. Right, right. Yeah. But just one of the scenes that got to me doesn't even involve the insects is like the Army goes to this town and like everybody's dead or missing. And the only survivors like this girl who's so traumatized, she's mute. And they, like tried to interview her and she just freaks out and just when they asked her like Who or What did and she just screams them them? So like that that was pretty effective especially for like 50s big monster B movie.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that scream like as soon as you started saying I could hear it in my head and it's one of those moments where like, it could be hokey but the delivery is just so perfect. It's kind of like the ending to the original Fly when you have the half the fly size half top human bottom fly and he stuck in the webinar and it's going help me like it's it's bit hokey, but just like how they do the sound design and stuff and how it's acted. It's just a really gets under your skin.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, exactly. And the practical effects for the answer is actually pretty decent. I mean, yeah, you can tell I mean, it's not realistic, but you know, it's still a pretty good design because like it's just these big giant ants with giant shopping and cisors that it is grabbing people up. Speaking of Tinder trauma and giant, giant creepy crawlies.

James Jay Edwards:

This isn't a movie but do you guys remember the episode of Gilligan's Island where they found the cave with a giant spider? No, I

Jacob Davidson:

was not aware of that.

James Jay Edwards:

They find a cave with a giant spider and the giant spiders obviously a dude on his hands and knees you know in like a spider costume that would run after them but it's pretty terrifying for you know, again, the same kid who was afraid of killer bees is afraid of this giant spider in the in the Gilligan's Island cave Gilligan's Island. Such a weird show. It taught me to be afraid of quicksand, too, which is really nothing to be afraid of.

Jacob Davidson:

Which again, another 90s kid thing that we were kind of taught to be afraid of but didn't really have any applicable use in real life. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

what was up with all the quick said, this is so much quicksand and so much 90s content and like that's just something I have never that an algebra I have never had to encounter in my adulthood. You know?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, quicksand. algebra and killer bees. All lies.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. quicksand. Definitely. I think it was more of a plot device than anything else. They're like, you know, what's something that can keep someone trapped? I know.

Jacob Davidson:

There you go. quicksand. And in terms of giant insect movies, that Yeah, there there were a bunch of those from like the 50s and 60s and a bunch of them were on Mystery Science Theater 3000 which is how I ended up watching them. Like, actually, it's funny at the beginning of the pandemic, I watched the Mystery Science Theater 3000 version of beginning of the end by Bert I Gordon who was so notorious for making movies about giant things that his his initials you know, were he was referred to big for it. I call them Mr. Big Mr. Big Yeah, exactly. And yeah, so like, beginning the end, you got giant killer. locusts or manases. And on there's the earth versus the spider. That was that was a fun. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Did he do the giant Gila monster? Oh, was that him? Or is that someone else? That one's hilarious because they use a normal sized lizard. And then they use like Matchbox cars and trains.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, yeah. Like, they just keep on having the the giant Gila monster kick over Matchbox cars and is and then they would do they would pan to the car like somebody in the car, but they'd like twist the camera around. So it looks like they're flipping over just like

James Jay Edwards:

it totally looked like the kind of thing that some you know, 12 year old kid who borrowed mom and dad's camcorder would make

Jacob Davidson:

but yeah, he did a bunch and yeah, like I said, a bunch of them are Mystery Science Theater. So like, Yeah, you got beginning of the end or versus a spider. These weren't on Mr. Science Theater, but Empire of the Ants. The Food of the Gods, food of the gods.

James Jay Edwards:

That's like gods. Is that an ant? One, two?

Jacob Davidson:

I think there were a few giant ants. And there is that's the thing. There was like a bunch of different animals because I mean, ants. So sorry, rats were pretty prominent, but I'm pretty sure there were also some giant answer. Giant beetles or something in there.

James Jay Edwards:

I think food of the gods might have been rats, actually. Now that you say that? Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

it's like rats. I remembered that frogs. It's been a real long time since I've seen that one. empire of ants. Did you already say that one?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Empire the ant? Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

that was solid kingdom of the spiders.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, that. Yeah, that's a good one.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Although that was a Joe bud Carlos. But yeah, yeah. No, I mean, you got William Shatner fighting an army of spiders.

Jonathan Correia:

Now, I have a question. How many recent insec horror movies have been have been like, this isn't something that is happens too often. And usually when it is it's like very low budget or made sci fi channel was making a lot of them for Oh,

Jacob Davidson:

they were in 2000s. I remember that. Oh, actually, there was a good one that came out a few years back was Mike Medicis Big Ass Spider. Yeah, remember that

James Jay Edwards:

big spider was a lot of fun. Yeah, and there was one even more recent than that Itsy Bitsy, which is Oh yeah. Yeah, yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, that was okay. I

James Jay Edwards:

mean, it was no big ass spider, but it was it was.

Jacob Davidson:

Drew drew just yeah, I mean, that's the thing like spiders will always be a perennial whore, you know staple because people are scared of spiders. So you know, big big spiders, small spiders, medium sized spiders. They're all scary. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I'm just curious as to what is it about like now that the it's not as you know, it's it's not as big of a like a commodity. You know, like, I know definitely like during the time when they them and all those others came out a lot of that was more so just like the fear around like nuclear radiation and what it can do, or fear the other, which is why we had like, aliens coming in and making these things with some of them. But

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, it's funny. You mentioned that because Yeah, actually, for my birthday, I watched that Joe Dante movie Matinee. Yeah. And you know, they have a whole kind of subplot about that where, you know, john Goodman plays, you know, bring up john Goodman again, he plays a William castle standard and named Lawrence Woolsey, whose new movie is called man's half man half and yeah, it says and he and he makes a direct connection between like people's fears about the Cold War. And you know, like his movie about radiation turning a guy into a half man half and and then into a giant, and it's just yeah, I mean, a lot of it is just, you know, people kind of deal with their social anxieties through, you know, kind of a more colorful and imaginative story.

James Jay Edwards:

I think that the reason we don't see him today as they're not as much fun because they're not going to use a an actual size, Gila monster knocking over Matchbox cars, they're going to use CG, and it's going to end up on the sci fi channel or as an asylum movie, and it's not going to be it's a different kind of fun. But when you watch those old classic ones, like I'm, like, taking it back to phase four, the macro shots that were done by the same dude who did them in I think it's called the house drone Chronicles or, you know, they another insect movie. So you got, you know, these close up shots of real ants, you know, it's they're not as creative now, you know, they'll have some kid in their basement doing the CGI, you know, and, and, and paying him seven bucks an hour to do it. But that's a different story. But I don't think that it's not as much fun to watch now.

Jacob Davidson:

And yeah, I think it's also just kind of a budgetary thing. Because, yeah, like you need a for for that type of stuff. You need, like a pretty big budget to make it look good. And I mean, there's definitely a lot of other ways you can do it. But yeah, just say it's a it's a commitment. So like,

Jonathan Correia:

I just, I just hope that that we can like bring it back. Because like we're talking we're and we're embracing the hokey pneus of you know, a when insects fight back or when insects come after man. But there's some like really effective stuff in there like, like with Creepshow and Phenomena where there's like some really good like, scares and social commentary that can be made. So I wonder if there's gonna be a cycle where in the next, like, 10 years or so we're gonna be seeing a lot of really good high quality insect attack movies, again, whether it's hybrids or giant ones or just swarms, you know? Yeah, well, I

Jacob Davidson:

mean, if this taqaddas socata swarm is any indication, I'm sure it's gonna inspire something relatively soon.

Jonathan Correia:

We did have a movie recently that had an entire town threatened by weaponized mosquitoes with Barb and Star Go to VISTA Del Mar. Oh, yeah, that's true. That was a plot in that movie.

Jacob Davidson:

That was a big plot point.

Jonathan Correia:

I love that movie so much. That's my most I got to rewatch it here.

Jacob Davidson:

So technically Barban star go to VISTA Del Mar is a insect horror movie. That's true. All right.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, let's get out of here. What are your favorites faithful listeners of the creepy crawly movies I know that we didn't have time to go too deep into it but um, let us know what your favorites are. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits Restless Spirits had a band camp sale Memorial Day weekend which is you know in the past you guys but it's happening right now now for us. So I hope you got something cool artwork is by Chris Fisher. I don't know if he's selling anything this memorial day weekend. Like everyone else is everyone from vinegar syndrome is shipped to shore. Yeah, it's like they know that I just got paid that time a year. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

thank God I got that late fee on that one gig. Oof. That's

James Jay Edwards:

you can find us at the Eye On Horror Facebook page the iHorror Facebook page. The Eye On Horror Twitter Instagram. What else do we have Korea

Jonathan Correia:

will soon you won't be able to see us on Stardust because star does that thing that we used to plug but kind of forgot about is now shutting down. I

James Jay Edwards:

was gonna say I had forgotten Stardust existed until we found out I was

Jonathan Correia:

suited I and I was the one who was posting most on it. For a minute there.

James Jay Edwards:

Yep. stardust. We hardly remember ye.

Jonathan Correia:

You were fun, but fun while it lasted. Maybe we'll start doing that on Instagram stories.

James Jay Edwards:

I feel like I had a start one of my huge Artists interviews might have been for the first quiet place. Hmm, might have been. But anyway, yeah, so you can find us there. And yeah, so let us know what your favorite creepy crawly movies are because these have been ours. So we'll see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm Jacob Davison and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Jacob The Birthday Boy
James FINALLY Watches A Quiet Place 2, So Does Correia
Anarchist Fashionistas And Whatnots
Jacob Review's Simon Barrett's Seance
Jay Review The Amusement Park
Correia Plays NIGHT TRAP!
Jacob watches Army of the Dead
Jay Makes the Absolute Worst Pun Ever, But We Forgive Him
Cicadas Cicadas, Tomato Tomato: Creepy Crawlies of Horror
Insect Kinder-Trauma
Phase IV FTW!
Lets Talk About Giant Versions of Things That Shouldn't be Giant