Eye On Horror

VHS Rewind with Benji Carver

March 15, 2021 iHorror Season 4 Episode 5
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, the guys welcome back Warped Dimension TV's Benji Carver to talk about why horror fans embrace the VHS culture.

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James Jay Edwards:

Que Eye On Horror The official podcast of iHorror calm This is Episode 62 otherwise known as season four Episode Five. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing fine. This is the best part of waking up on Sundays

James Jay Edwards:

yet we're still doing this early on Sundays and hey seemed to work also with me yet again is your other other host, Jon Correi a, what's going on Korea?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, you know, bright and early, bright eyed and bushy tailed, you know, still haven't moved. We got delayed again. But you know, it's a it's fun having all my blu rays packed up. It's totally not bringing out the neuroses in me. Not being able to look at all those beautiful spines and pick something at random.

James Jay Edwards:

Also with us today, this week, we have a special guest and we're gonna bring him on right now because because we want to talk to him and he's gonna have a lot to say about what we've watched. I'm sure you might remember him. We've had him on before he's a two timer Benji Carver Is that right? Benji? Carver's that how you say that?

Benji Carver:

Yeah, that's that's pretty much it. It's

James Jay Edwards:

it's Benji

Benji Carver:

Benji Benji you know like the dog Benji the Hunted? Like the dragon episode that everyone should watch. Dragon 67

James Jay Edwards:

Benji is the curator of Warp Dimension film is that that's still what it's called. Right Warp Dimension.

Benji Carver:

We are pretty much Warp Dimension TV at this point.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay. Yeah, that's something we'll talk about because now it's it's the online thing went so well. You're doing it for real, right.

Benji Carver:

Yeah, it's been. I mean, essentially, we've all been stuck in some warp dimension for this past year.

Jacob Davidson:

Aint that the truth.

Benji Carver:

But yeah, it is now become its own weekly thing as well. So yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

thanks for coming back your you you join Kelly McNeely and Waylon Jordan as to timer's

Jacob Davidson:

an exclusive club it is it is

James Jay Edwards:

yes. What do you guys been doing this week? Korea and I settled a bet this week. Yes, he watched Blair

Witch 2:

Book of Shadows. And I watched again, Gus Van Sant's Psycho. We had a deal. Yep. What do you think of Book Shadows?

Jonathan Correia:

You know? It wasn't it wasn't good. But it wasn't terrible. You know like for like for like the flak it gets it's super too early 2000s like I know we were talking about with Steven Kostanski. Like, not just the soundtrack, but like the filmmaking and stuff. It was a bit guilty of that like *PSH PSH*, type editing stuff that like

James Jay Edwards:

and then that whole

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, the twitchy head.

James Jay Edwards:

See what I just did, but it was perfect. I made I made my head do that. Thir13en Ghosts thing.

Jonathan Correia:

That blur? Yeah, I was about to say very ladder. Yeah. But it wasn't bad. I thought it was interesting. A lot of the like, kind of meta commentary that we're trying to do with it. There was some interesting stuff. It was cheesy, as all hell. But you know, I did have a lot of fun with it. I watched it while I was working out and I had so much fun with it. So like I didn't, I didn't hate the movie I had, I had a good time. But like, Man, it's it's nowhere. I like kind of liked how it wasn't even trying to it felt like it wasn't even trying to attempt to be scary. Like the first one. Like it was just like, now we're just gonna do a bunch of really weird stuff.

James Jay Edwards:

It's more like a sequel to the hype of the first movie than it is a sequel to the first movie because it plays on that it's like, because the dude is basically trying to cash in on where he lives.

Jonathan Correia:

I just wish it a kind of dived more into the negative effects on what that kind of movie can have on a small town. Like they kind of touched upon it. But to me, that was a bit more interesting. But there was there was fun stuff like they would like the hidden footage with in rewinding it and all that. And that was fun.

James Jay Edwards:

When it first came out on VHS. And I don't know if how you watched it. But there was this weird thing they did. They called it as river which is reverse backwards. There would be hidden messages in different scenes. And you had to figure out if there was a whole thing you could do where you find the hidden scenes that would give you numbers and you put them together and crack this code. It can only be done on VHS. So I don't know if if they're trying to do it on DVD. I don't know how they would do it. But they were trying to be interactive. But this was 2001 probably.

Jacob Davidson:

Actually I think it was the year 2000.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, well, I mean that the home release, so yeah, right. Maybe it was 2000 And maybe maybe they rushed it to video.

Jonathan Correia:

Benji is that a future warp dimension episode putting on Blair Witch to on VHS and trying to decode the messages?

Benji Carver:

Um, this could be a possibility of a secret hidden episode on our Patreon but um well it's funny cuz you you mentioned it because I recently purchased the double feature of Blair Witch the original with Curse of The Blair Witch on VHS is

Jacob Davidson:

a love Curse of The Blair Witch

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, Curse of The Blair Witch is great.

Benji Carver:

It's actually in its own way its own like hidden sequel because it's all the extra footage they didn't use they film more footage as well.

James Jay Edwards:

Personal Blair Witch is almost necessary to make The Blair Witch scary because the thing about Blair Witch and I've always said this, it wasn't such a movie as it was a cultural phenomenon. So you kind of needed the website and the that you needed the internet.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, like there was a lot of links on the sci fi channels website.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. And you had to you kind of needed to know the backstory, or you didn't get the movie. So I love that. I mean, I know that that is a bonus feature on the blu ray that I have a Blair which is all those documentaries because you kind of need them.

Jonathan Correia:

I have the parody on VHS. The I forget what it's

James Jay Edwards:

The Scooby Doo one?

Jacob Davidson:

the bear winch project.

James Jay Edwards:

It's the porn one.

Jonathan Correia:

It's the one where it's like the guy where the covers guy going and with his head back and like I think it is the one where it's the guy with like, boogers just up but it's like a bunch of like fan film parodies wrapped in one. I don't know, I got it for like 50 cents at a goodwill.

Jacob Davidson:

I had the Blair thumb project, you know, like that, Steve Odenkirk thumb parody movie.

Benji Carver:

That'll be that'll be showing up in a warp dimension with the I hate the thumb mufa movies, but that one has to show up.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's move on to Gus Van Sant psycho, because that was my part of the deal. I've seen it before I stand by my statement. It's a it's a film school exercise its replication. He does a little other crazy things. But I mean, basically its replication and unless you're into it unless you don't like black and white movies or you somehow like Vince Vaughn more than Anthony Perkins or something. It's I just think it's I still think it's kind of a pointless movie.

Jonathan Correia:

First of all, bro, you're gonna insult Vince Vaughn bro.

James Jay Edwards:

When comparing him to Anthony Perkins as Norman Bates. Yeah, I'm gonna insult him. I do. I will admit that Anne Heche a pretty good Marion crane. No, I did enjoy that.

Jonathan Correia:

And Julianne Moore is just always, you know, great to watch. She's, she's

James Jay Edwards:

Julianne Moore. I don't know if she should have pushed her agent harder to get her into the Poltergeist remake or if she should have fired her agent for making her do psycho and Carrie,

Jonathan Correia:

she was the best part of Carrie

James Jay Edwards:

she is in two of the most pointless Horror route remakes. That's why I say you know, she should have hit the trifecta in lobby for a part in Poltergeist.

Jonathan Correia:

But I mean like and that's the thing too, like I i'm not saying that Gus Van St. Psycho is a great film it but it's, it's interesting, exactly as an exercise. It's because you know, there's always people complaining about remakes and stuff. And I think that that one is a perfect example of it's like okay, we did the exact same thing and you know, without the context of the original footage so if you know nothing about and never have seen the original Can you watch that film and and view it as a good film? like is this film only bad because the original exists? So there's like the Schroeder's you know effect with it. I guess I don't even know if it's Schroeder, but like, you know,

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

Schrodinger?

Jonathan Correia:

Schrodinger

James Jay Edwards:

Schrodinger cat thing. You do have a point. I think that if I had no prior knowledge of the original psycho, I would probably have a higher opinion of Gus Van Sant psycho just because it is a well made movie. But you're comparing it to one of the most well maded movies of all time. So it is just replication. So but but you you have a point if I was, you know, if I went into it, and what was it 99 you know, if I was 15 in 1999, and, you know, had not even heard of Alfred Hitchcock and went into that. It would be a pretty good movie. It's a well made movie. It's just kind of pointless I think.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, cuz the performances in the movie are great. Like I know Vince Vaughn is no Anthony Perkins. But he is really really solid Norman Bates like, you know, honestly, like if you were to think about it's like, maybe if they didn't do a full remake, but if they did like a reboot or another sequel or something. I think Vince Vaughn could have taken up the mantle pretty well with that, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

and William H Macy is our biggest

Jonathan Correia:

he's a great arva gas is awesome cast like and again, I'm not saying you know, we should look back on that movie and give it all this praise, but there is like some really cool and interesting like discussion that can be had by That film existing and I think that alone is worth its existence. You know,

Benji Carver:

I don't want to lose viewers, but I actually think psycho is not my favorite Hitchcock movie. So I in defense of that, I think I'm a big Vertigo fan. So that's the I feel like he made psycho in the sense of, oh, you lost your touch with the audience. Okay, let me show you what I can do.

James Jay Edwards:

Psycho. He definitely wanted to strip down from vertigo with psycho. And, you know, he used his crew from his TV show. I mean, that tells you at all, and he purposely, this was 1969. And he shot in black and white. I mean, they were doing color for 60 years at that point. So it's not because it's an old movie, that it's in black and white, that was a stylistic choice. So, I mean, it might have been a response to his critics who are saying, Oh, we used to overblown? Well, take this.

Benji Carver:

No, in the marketing of that, I think is the other thing, too, is was I think it goes back to Blair Witch thing is that that whole, like, we will not see people after the first 10 minutes this movie, you know, and things like that, and him coming on

Jonathan Correia:

when you leave the theater, or you leave immediately, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

when the trailer was basically just him walking around the hotel saying, This is the place where this happened. And this is the place so it didn't show you. And I think that piqued curiosity, it didn't show you any of the movie it just showed. And granted, it's Alfred Hitchcock given the tour. So you kind of know a little bit about what you're in for. But, you know, yeah, the marketing, they you know, he knew what he's doing.

Jonathan Correia:

I still say that psycho is one of the prime examples of how you make a trailer without actually giving away anything about the movie that The Shining trailer and Back to the Future are three of the best trailers of all time, because they don't use a single well, Shining trailer does use one single shot from the movie but they cuz you know, trailers give away too much. And it's like, No, you don't have to like shoot something real small. I mean, that Shining trailer is literally just like, it's giving you everything you need to know Kubrick I'm doing Stephen King thing. Here's a fuck ton of blood. I'll see you at the theaters. motherfuckers

James Jay Edwards:

re words Jason Takes Manhattan.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Leatherface the Texas Chainsaw Massacre three.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. The Excalibur trailer.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Now that was marketing.

Jonathan Correia:

I was so pissed off when I finally watched that movie. And that scene was not in the movie. Like I was like, yeah, wait, there is no Excalibur moment in this movie? What the fuck!

Benji Carver:

Okay, put it on as a stinger at the end. They didn't even do that.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. unfortunate.

James Jay Edwards:

I also saw another thing, which it's a little embarrassing. It's taken me this long to get to it because we did a promotion for it last year. I finally got around to Fantasy Island. Oh, have you guys seen Fantasy Island?

Jacob Davidson:

No,

Jonathan Correia:

I've seen the original show a bunch.

James Jay Edwards:

It it's I don't want to say anything bad about it. Because we did do a promo for it. But it's it's pretty bad. It is. Um, it's real disjointed. It's almost like five episodes of The Twilight Zone, intercut with each other. And they all do trying to come together in the end. But what is weird about it is, at first I thought there was this genius twist. And I'm like, Oh, that's awesome. This is great. And then that wasn't the genius twist. And then there was another one. I'm like, Oh, that's it. This is genius. And that wasn't it. And finally, after all these red herring twists, I was just sick and tired. I don't even care about by the end, but I will say the absolute last thing that happens in the movie, and I don't want to spoil it. But the last thing that happens in the movie, it's the part of the movie that got the most emotional reaction out of you, which was a laugh, like right before the credits roll. I was cracking up because it's pretty it's pretty funny. But yeah, it's a it's a little long. It's it's an hour and 50 minutes, which I think they should could shave 20 minutes off of it and not lose a beat. But I say that about every movie. I mean, give me an 80 minute slasher you know, but that being said, the director's cut of midsommar is better than the theatrical so

Benji Carver:

Jay you shouldn't say it's Blum House's Fantasy Island sorry.

James Jay Edwards:

Not Fantasy Island, Blum House's Fantasy Island. Yeah,

Benji Carver:

I'm I'm actually a fan of I'm not a fan of the movie but I went in with a real like, this is gonna be garbage. And the only complaint I had is that it should have committed to an R rating. It has this weird like, this should have been R feel to it and it's totally pG 13 cut down. And I it's one of my but I that last moment would not to reveal anything. did get a good laugh out of me as well.

James Jay Edwards:

But I won't say it's worth the two hours before it. But when the most impact movie has on me is basically the punch line that kind of says more about your does about the punch line.

Benji Carver:

Also, the cast is great Ryan Hansen from moon was Maggie Q i think is in it and Michael Pena it's got a great cast, but

James Jay Edwards:

my issue with him is he's doing Ricardo montalban though the whole time he's like all he's all vcsu a fantasy. You must continue till the you know, I'm like, Dude, this is your Marvel accent don't give us Ricardo montalban.

Jonathan Correia:

See you just sold me with that, like I want more people to be doing Ricardo montalban impressions like that. That should be a sub genre on its own.

Benji Carver:

I mean Ricardo montalban.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I mean, I'm just saying if there's if there's an entire sub genre of movies ripping off Django Why isn't there an entire sub genre of movies ripping off Ricardo montalban? Just saying,

Jacob Davidson:

and speaking of VHS, I got a new movie from vinegar syndrome that, you know, I feel like I had to watch for therapeutic reasons. That's The Fear, which was, I think just such a classic 90s VHS staple because it had this creepy as hell cover with this, like, wooden mannequin face. And like, when I was a kid, you know, I was wandering like, the VHS I was I see that. And it would freak me out. Because it's like, the fit is it's like the face was looking at you. And you know, and I feel like that's kind of like why a lot of people been rewatching it and it's basically about this, like, psychological therapy group that goes out to a cabin in the woods to have. And I feel like this, this was a plot of a lot of movies in the 90s for some reason, like a fear experiment. And there's this weird wooden mannequin in the cabin named Morty. And eventually, Morty comes to life and starts killing them with their worst fears. Like No, it's not like A Nightmare on Elm Street kind of way because like he's like, mute for most of the movie just kind of tracks people with his creepy mannequin eyes. It's not Yeah, it was not nearly as scary as I imagined it was based off the VHS cover, which, you know, I feel like it's a lot of VHS ho ror movies. I mean, it was interesting to revisit and i is pretty cool because Wes Cr ven actually has a cameo at the beginning and at the end. So that was interesting. And th y got a 15 minute documentary a out the making of the mo ie that connects to a lot of stu f. So I love that there was a th me song to the the monster Mort by the rapper, he Shazam. And t e music video was actually mad at the aero theater in Santa Mo ica. So like I said, you know, i 's kind of therapeutic to kind of revisit, like a VHS movi that's covered scared the shi out of me when I was a kid and rewatch it years later and figu e like, Oh, that was really cary

Jonathan Correia:

That's usually the case. Like I I went back and revisit Ghost and I was like, I don't know why this movie terrorized me for, you know, 10 years as a child.

Benji Carver:

It's a great cover.

James Jay Edwards:

Korea. Benji, what do you guys been watching? Before we segue into our big topic, actually, I have a feeling Benji's what he's been watching is gonna segue us perfectly into our topic. Yeah, I

Benji Carver:

was writing down notes already. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Actually, I finally got to watch one of my most anticipated films of the year. Did you guys see the Vigil or Vigil? Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

well, I did that. Oh, that was a good one. Oh, man.

Jonathan Correia:

I have been saying it for a while I want more Jewish horror because

Jacob Davidson:

Same here!

Jonathan Correia:

is phenomenal. It's you know, it's a story of a of a man who has to watch over a dead body over the night and you know, spooky stuff happens. Very simple setup. And it's very effective that there's some moments and some, you know, techniques where it's, you know, it's kind of evident that it's the first time you know, filmmaker, but it's really solid. There's some really tense creepy moments in it. And it really holds its own with like, some pretty awesome performances to the lead. Really, like, makes you nervous. Like with his acting like the whole time, there's just like, this tension with him. Like, even before spooky stuff happens. He just brings out the anxiety in me. So yeah, I really dug it.

Jacob Davidson:

And it had some great set scares, like I was actually watching it at home. And I jumped in my chair at a couple a couple scenes, like they did a really good job of building up the tension. And I totally agree that there needs there should definitely be more Jewish horror movies, which you know, has a history of its own, you know, you look at stuff like dirt Golem, or The Keep, and I mean, it's there. It's just there's so much more material, especially from Jewish folklore that could be used for material for such movies.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. And so much like, of like creature mythology comes from Yiddish folk tales and stuff.

Jacob Davidson:

The Dybbuk,

Jonathan Correia:

The Dibbuk, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

there was a movie about the devic box. Was it possession? A few years back? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And then what do they keep calling? What do they call john wick?

Jacob Davidson:

Bobba Yagga, I mean, that's more Russian folklore than Jewish folklore.

Jonathan Correia:

It's more Russian, but I could have sworn I read somewhere that like, there's like some Yiddish influence with it.

Jacob Davidson:

Maybe but I don't know recall exactly,

Jonathan Correia:

but it is very Russian. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

But ya know, like I, you know, I went to Hebrew school when I was younger, so, you know, going over, you know, store stories and stuff from Jewish history, folklore, like, yeah, there's just a wealth of material just sitting there. That way to be adapted.

Jonathan Correia:

Like, Come on, guys. There's enough Christian Exorcist movies out there to last us a lifetime and most of them aren't great. So let's, let's, let's get into the other cultures. Let's, let's start mining those for some great, you know, horror

James Jay Edwards:

what have you been watching Benji?

Benji Carver:

So, um, I just wanted to say it's good to hear the visual I need to see it because my good friend Brett edited the vigil So, um, and he's been talking about it, but Brett Bachmann's a great, great one of the great editors that we have right now. And so and I knew that he made that with a Color Out of space was the other film that he edited.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, awesome.

Benji Carver:

And there's a third one too. He was he need like three he's like the one of the hardest working guys I know right now. It's just always, like, he's in New Mexico right now cutting some sci fi movie. Um, but I just wanted to shout that out. But what I've been watching, so I had it divided up into two things. It's the of course, what's new that I've been watching. And then, which I've watched a lot, and I realized, just listen to y'all. And also the VHS stuff. So I'll just do the new stuff first. So new things. Um, I just watched Boss Level this weekend.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, how is that

Benji Carver:

it gets better. And I like waking up. I hate messenger movies. But I kind of like the message. That movie gives us four because we've seen that Groundhog Day story so much. And the movie itself at the beginning. I was like, okay, like, this is probably why it took a minute to get to somewhere in the theaters or to watch but I actually really liked where it ended up. It felt like a great one of those these great 80s b movies. Which I think Joe Carnahan does that hate it or love it kind of thing. Unless I watch Coming 2 America, on prime. And again, you know, definitely not the original, more family friendly. Um, but you know what, at the end of the movie, I was like, I'm happy this exists. And it's like, it's Friday, like, Friday after next. I'm happy it exists. Um,

Jonathan Correia:

whoa, Friday after next is, is a great Christmas movie.

Benji Carver:

But that's the thing. Well, that's its issue, though, at the end of the day is that it feels like it's an episode in the TV series of Friday, Friday. Not not a movie. It's like, I'm like, I want to see more of a movie. You know, it almost seems like hey, that's so and so are new characters keep popping up. This one, to me was like this. And I also thought it was really cool for showing me like about family and about kind of the world that we live in now. The film did a great job of about becoming who you are. Again, it's weird. Like I don't like message movies. But I like the overall messages. These two films have about like, family and some I don't know, it's really weird that I'm saying it. But to top it off about family and about Anne Heche The Vanished on Netflix. Anyone seen this movie?

Jacob Davidson:

I haven't seen that.

Benji Carver:

Um, check it out. My girlfriend and I watched it. We are obsessed with it right now. It is it is another B movie, you know, 101 film starring Tom Jane and haish and Jason Patrick, the Thanksgiving movie on top of that, but it is involving and it's always directed by Peter fatale. I remember him he was like the kind of the douche bro and like, Can't Hardly Wait. And like a lot of late 90s early 2000 movies. He wrote directed and produced this and it's about the simple premises is that a family of four by Tom Jane and an haish are in their RV with their daughter and they go to some remote Lakeside like creepy cabin, but they're in their RV the whole time. And their daughter goes missing and everything just goes haywire within a couple days on Thanksgiving weekend. And it is I hope people yeah definitely it is it is a movie that just you're like really there's so many plot holes going through it but it is a it is like a truck the RV is plowing through like moments that I and the and the performance they give her so over the top Anne Heche and Tom Jane so you'll definitely like Tom jeans fishing hat. Let's say

Jonathan Correia:

you had me at fishing hat.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh yeah, me too.

Benji Carver:

It's on Netflix. I'd recommend checking on like a you know with a few beers in your system, kind of movie. But then VHS was um Crackhouse, Canon's Crackhouse for making anything I highly we're going to be doing that and worked on warp dimension TV next month. It's part of our tribute to canon. Another one it starts Richard Roundtree Jim Brown. And he has this great intro the VHS of it of Richard Roundtree talking about crack cocaine and the crack epidemic. Don't smoke crack hits, you know, believe the pipe and then Ten to Midnight, which is Oh, Charles Bronson. It's closest like Dirty Harry movie. Yeah, never that. Yeah. I'm totally Reagan ending, you know, mental illness. Yeah. And murder. Yeah, meet Ted Bundy, Richard spec kind of thing. Also an amazing performance by the guy. I always his name escapes me, but the killer in that naked 85% of the time.

Jacob Davidson:

And they filmed part of that at the aero theater.

Benji Carver:

They did. Yeah. It's a Butch Cassidy. Sundance Kid. He goes, Yeah, as his his his. his alibi, which is pretty good alibi.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, we played and we played it there as kind of an anniversary thing.

Jonathan Correia:

10 to midnight is one of those like one line movies that sold me instantly. So I would just wait. So yeah, Charles Bronson's in a slasher and I'm done. I'm, I'm so their,

Benji Carver:

well, it's also like he really like he it's probably his most morally gray character they've ever put them in because like Death Wish one? It kinda is like, he starts out as like, Oh, he's a liberal, but he's really just an asshole to begin with. Yeah, Death Wish one. This one's actually like he, there's something that I don't want to if people haven't seen it, but he does that. It's like, oh, and then he kind of owns up to it and you're like, and that kind of actually have the third act begins is because of what he what he did. He's, it's really this great example of he's not a good guy. He's really just so as a filmmaker once filmmaker voice says, Oh, he's a protagonist. That's all he is. Yeah. So, um, but then Another Day in Paradise, Larry Clark's feature after kids, starring James Woods, Melanie Griffith in the creditor, and Natasha Gretchen Wagner. Has anyone seen that film? I don't know that one. Highly recommended it's probably Larry Clark's best narrative movie because he's not known for being narrative friendly. Also hopeful film but it's totally about about four junkies to have them take in these these teen kids play by Natasha Krishna Wagner and in the crusher to go on like a sort of a road trip drug deal heist. And Lou Diamond Phillips shows up in this is a transgender, like criminal, that it's it is a it is a fascinating film. I grew up watching it a lot. It might explain a little bit about my behavior. Um, James would probably want to James Woods top five performances for sure. Melanie Griffith, definitely it's up there with Something Wild on her in her performance, but also, it is co I didn't know this until I was rewatching. It It is co written by Chris Langdon Christopher Langdon and it's I think it's his first movie he has writing credit on so so I ibmc now that in Paradise, highly recommend on that end, and then a Highway with Jared Leto and Jake Gyllenhaal Another one

Jonathan Correia:

is that a part of the freeway series? Well,

Benji Carver:

it could be it could be what it is is not to not to take too much more time up but it's um, is that it's a it is Jake Gyllenhaal and Jared Leto are these two biggest Las Vegas outskirts living in the trailer like outskirts slackers who have to go on the road and they go up to Seattle and it takes place when Kurt Cobain died also it's a period piece but we'll see about how that's it's one that has the rights are really weird on it.

James Jay Edwards:

When was it made

Benji Carver:

early 2000s

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, I thought all these VHS things were from the 80s I like Kurt Cobain died 94

Benji Carver:

Well, it was made in the early 2000s But yeah, it's it is a period piece it is takes place in 94 in Vegas Vegas to Seattle that

James Jay Edwards:

about 10 years before

Benji Carver:

and Candyman farewell to the flesh I can't wait you can't even film um Korea I think you and I talked a little bit about that I think in our in our in our conversation

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I I still stand like his Farewell farewell to the flesh was a recent watch for me too I got to Scream Factory blue. And I there was a lot about that movie that I liked more than the original. I thought the mythology just even having Candyman take place in New Orleans just fits better, you know than it does in Chicago. But yeah, I loved farewell to flash and it was also very interesting because I'm a huge fan of the OSI so you know, getting to see the moment I love seeing characters or actors from the OC pop up in 90s horror films. It's It's fantastic.

Benji Carver:

She is no Virginia Madsen but I'm with the radio DJ really gets me in my head. That's where I I've always kind of always envisioned the character wanting to be that character. With that with that Wolfman jack voice um, but I wanted to segue as I watched Out of Bounds on on Drafthouse VOD a watch party that right before you know, they announced their big chapter 11 Have you seen out of bounds at all? It's um, Eddie Michael Hall and oh, who's also in it, um, the girl from New dark. I'm blanking on it right now. But um, she's like a great 80s like actress, but it's, imagine this movie as its Breakfast Club meets Beverly Hills Cop. Jenny, right. I'm Jenny. Right. That's also great performance and Young Guns 2. She gives. Um, so that movie was interesting, because I did a watch party, finally with the VOD with Drafthouse. And I was like, all this is great. Vidiots was sponsoring the event. And then all sudden, two or three days later, they made that announcement was like, wait, what's going on? I was kind of like, as we all been in that Limbo with with Alamo Drafthouse and what's been happening there, but also with streaming services. And what we're kind of doing now is we are going back to the theater and whatnot. So But anyways, it's kind of like a great hybrid of like, VHS, Alamo streaming, kind of thing. So

Jacob Davidson:

yeah. And I and while we're talking about I want to add that I did join The Hitcher VHS screening you guys did last week.

Benji Carver:

Same. Thank you. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that was a lot of fun. And although I also wanted to point out that I was really glad that you guys played gunman gunman's blues, which was the movie that the writer Eric read, made is like a short movie before he made the hitcher, which I'd never even seen or heard before, but really hooked me like it was really well made. And just Yeah, the whole show before the actual hitch was great. And is every time I watched the hitcher, I just I just think like this is one of Rucker Howard's greatest performances like it just it really is every everyone's on point in that movie

Benji Carver:

I just I think it's even see Thomas how as his performances if anything is probably more real if he's really frightening record Oh yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

It's hard not to be

Benji Carver:

what he also revealed yet like C. Thomas Howells like career as he kind of did this whole like, you know, 80s you know, teen heartthrob and then all sudden became like this, like, weird B-Movie 90s action star like just him and Eric Roberts or even like, intersect and some of these movies too. Like they're on that on that end.

Jonathan Correia:

And it all culminates in Hitcher 2

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah, with Jake Bucy. Yeah.

Benji Carver:

Has anyone seen this? I have not seen it. I don't know. Um,

Jacob Davidson:

I saw it like a long time ago on the sci fi channel.

Jonathan Correia:

I just got it because of that of your screening. The other day, I ended up buying that and the hitcher remake digitally. And also, he finally he got me to finally watch my copy of Flesh + Blood, which Holy crap, I was not like I know it was a Paul Verhoeven movie, but I was not expecting that film to be so nihilistic and just not angry, but it was just like, this is you could tell that was Paul Verhoeven going, you know, people romanticizing the medieval times, way too much. I'm going to show like how much that time periods sucked. And it was plague scenes hit. So, so different in 2021

Benji Carver:

is Game of Thrones 1985.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's move on to our topic, which this is a good segue to it. Because what we want to talk about this week, and Benji is the perfect guy to talk about this with is one of the VHS culture and how, especially in the horror genre, it's, it's more than just nostalgia. I think it's, I mean, that's a huge part of it, but there's also an aesthetic to it. Where I guess the question is why your horror fans embrace VHS culture, more than say, guys who like comedies or dramas, you know, I mean, is it I think it is nostalgia, but I also think it's accessibility available, but there's a lot of movies that people remember fondly from their youth that you can't get any other way. So you end up having to track down a VHS

Benji Carver:

Yeah. Do you want me to start off or Yeah. That's a jumping

James Jay Edwards:

off point. And

Benji Carver:

yeah, so I think the thing is, is that it's it's a it's there's there was an art form that is lost with I mean, I know vinegar syndrome and Severin and Scream Factory shout factory have definitely brought back the the posters or the kind of the these images but that I think is definitely one of the it's like a trading card system. on that. What else I don't want to speak to that. Because there are some great documentaries like Rewind This, that talk about that and near people that have been in this been in the VHS community long before I've been, this has been sort of been my project for the last like two years. kind of thing. Um, but I think that that there's this sort of this lost art or it's like, it's a very like Indiana Jones uncovering of like, Oh, you know, this and then this movie's like, not even on eBay. So like, How much is it? It could be like hundreds of dollars, and stuff like that? Or 1000s of dollars? I mean, I know that Disney tapes are going for insane amounts.

James Jay Edwards:

Are they though? I know people are listing them, but are people actually buying them for those? I don't think so.

Benji Carver:

I don't know.

Jonathan Correia:

The whole Black Diamond on the spine thing is absolute bullshit. I mean, and the only time I really feel like old copies of Disney movies actually go for big prices is when stuff gets vaulted or, and but it always comes out of the vault, like five or 10 years later. But sometimes they do edit stuff out. So like, I know they're putting out Fantasia again, but they're probably gonna, like, you know, cut out, you know, some of the not good at all racist caricature is in it. So, like older blu ray

James Jay Edwards:

started on song and a South

Jonathan Correia:

line rewind back that

Benji Carver:

was literally as a VHS tape, we can fast forward and rewind. Um, but yeah, I think that, that that is definitely that is there. Um, I think it also there's just, I think something Someone touched upon maybe here, uh, when we were doing some of these questions is that, you know, there's there are movies that still don't exist in any other format because of rights issues. Um, I mean, The Hitcher, for example, actually, doesn't it someone was claiming on the in the show that there's a German blu ray. Yeah, but I don't think it's the same. But is it is I think the quality is not there still like it. There's no remaster?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I'll come back with feedback on that. Cuz I did buy that on eBay. I chimed in, because I remember diabolik DVD had it, but it's sold out so quick. Because you know, everyone, it's so hard to get a copy of the history was on HBO max for a minute. But

James Jay Edwards:

I've got an old DVD of the hitcher. I mean, and it looks like an old DVD. I mean, it's nothing special. It's not like a remaster. It's a budget. But you know, it has been available on DVD. I think I got it in a two pack with I don't know, it might have even been The Night Flyer, another one that's hard to find.

Jonathan Correia:

Either on VHS.

Benji Carver:

Those transfers are literally just off of VHS rip, but like they're not even on negatives or anything like that. Um, and so yeah, I think that there's that there. I mean, in the horror community, I think, especially for this podcast, it's, and then there could be other answers there too. But I feel like it is like this sort of like, hey, there's this nature of, Oh, I have something there's something hidden about it. But then on top of that, I think is the is the video store. That was our absolutely, example. Because I worked for a Hollywood video there. There are movies that I remember working for that I found there that work, they had transitioned out of VHS around the time I started working for him. But there were movies that definitely have had very limited runs on DVD and there's VHS 's that are out there that are maybe more and more accessible. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

well, to kind of what you used to go. I mean, and this, you know, I'm probably dating myself by now. But like in the 80s you know, I would go to warehouse, you know, in the back of the warehouse record store, there was a video section, and you go back there, and you chose the movie you were going to watch that night by the cover. Yeah. And that's Yeah. Faces of Death. Yeah, something that kind of went away with even blockbuster Hollywood video because they would just have you know, it just like a plain white box. When you would rent something from warehouse you will actually take like the clamshell and this is also when you know the rental copies probably cost 200 bucks. So if you lost it, they would charge your card for the 200 bucks. But I'm looking at your horror secti n is especially fun because you ould see ones like I believ The Gates of Hell was one of hem. It says banned in 50 coun ries in your life. I'm renting he says was another one. It's like also scary. You'll bump yourself up. I didn't actually say that. But it was something similar and you're like, Oh, yeah, okay, Challenge accepted. I'm Renting pieces, you know. So I part of it, I think I think you're right, it's going to a video store and looking at the covers, and it's not the same as just, you know, clicking through like Netflix or Amazon Prime or Shudder even where you see like, especially because art is this days. I mean how we were joking a few episodes ago. I think with Steve Konstanski. How many times have we seen that same girl crawling away from the camera? cover art isn't what it used to be either, but that's how you used to choose your movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, that's a Yeah, it's like what I was talking about before with The Fear like The Fear wasn't really great movie but it had a great video. Test cover, which is what, like so many people are bonding about when they got the blu ray release. And, you know, because it's it's a shared experience, you know, like we wander around the video store. And it's like it left it up to the imagination. You know, like, you see all these different VHS covers, and like monsters and stuff, and especially in the horror aisle, like the horror, VHS covers, were much more visceral and really hooked you, you know, it's why there's so many great classic horror video posters, especially from that time period. And it actually got that book, the VHS video cover are by Thomas Hodge and do designs. And yeah, that's a that's a thing that was a real art form to it back then.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, there had to be because I think there was more at stake back in the 80s, where you had to have a good cover, because people that's how people were picking it. Now, as they're flipping through, you know, Netflix, the cover doesn't have to stand out as much. I mean, which we've been discussing, I think that now, there's other ways that people you know, it's more like buzz about a title than it is just go in strictly by what the cover looks like.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, and also just for historical context, we have to remember that VHS was like, the first like, what, and with video rental stores, it made home viewing accessible, you know, because before then you could only really see movies in theaters. And that's if it was playing in your area, you know, and then on top of that it will or it would be television viewings where would also be edited for time and commercials and stuff. So when VHS came out more people were able to watch movies at home and it was a huge market. So yeah, they had to stand out because a lot of these movies weren't getting theatrical. They were made for video, so they had to, you know, catch the eye and, and I think nostalgia does play a big part because how many of us remember poking the Bleeders cover to move the blood around?

Jacob Davidson:

I did that

Jonathan Correia:

or playing with the Jack Frost and Jack Frost 2 covers to make his mouth opening close, you know?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Yeah. Which is why I love vinegar syndrome because they any of those other labels that Benji was bringing up that they kind of brought that back in a way is particularly vinegars syndrome, like they actually you know, brought the lithographic 3d cover for their Jack Frost release. And also Demon Wind, which is another favorite of mine. So

Jonathan Correia:

this is a great cover. Oh my god. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

just the demon bursting through the window. I love that. It was just a big you know, it made it made it fun. It made it it made even you know just a cover art entertaining, like it had real hook

James Jay Edwards:

your Korea's point, you're right, where back when home viewing was a brand new thing. That is the only way you could watch it. especially things like I remember when we first got our first VHS VCR and I was probably 13 maybe 12. But I'm the guy at the store gave my dad a free rental. And he came home with the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. And, and I had heard of this movie, of course, you know, from all my friends talking about it, but I had never seen it because it you know, this was a good 10 years after the movie was made. It had long been out of theaters. They're never going to show Texas Chainsaw Massacre on TV at least not back then. So I'm like I'm gonna get to see the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. This is awesome. You know, and you know, and it was it was I'm at home watching the Texas Chainsaw Massacre. That's awesome.

Benji Carver:

Yeah, that's definitely in the Forbidden Zone of VHS. I remember sneaking that by my dad one summer. And then and then actually, shockingly being like, wait, this isn't the part two that I thought it was gonna be like the super gory version.

James Jay Edwards:

On that massacre is not by today's standards. It's a pretty tame movie. I mean, it's got its moments, you know, the sledgehammer into the head, you know, and the sawing of the of the guy in the wheelchair, but for the most part, it's a pretty tame movie.

Jonathan Correia:

It's just a dirty and filthy movie.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, and the fact that I had heard so much about it and I'm like, Oh, I'm gonna get to see it. I'm gonna get to see it. I'm gonna get

Jonathan Correia:

to see it you know what I find because like James brought it up earlier it's it's just one of those things where it's like horror cult, you know exploitation and and a bit of sci fi fans we're kind of the only people keeping VHS alive because outside of us I think the only people that really still own VHS tapes are like grandparents who never moved on with the format's, you know, or people who just want stuff's super cheap. It's it's very it's a very niche thing and it just is a testament to how dedicated horror you know genre fans ar and that we keep this dea format alive. That's like fo three or four generations bac and then there's, you know because I know there's there' some things where it's like, oh the Reese the there is a blu ra of it, but they edited the scen out and it's only on VHS There's a lot of that with lase disc collectors, we're not goin to get into LaserDisc bu especially the Criterion, lase discs, you know, their specia features or commentaries on i that were never seen on an other format again. So there' always little things like that but VHS didn't have the specia features for the most part

James Jay Edwards:

Well, the commentaries, you would have to take a plug out and plug into a different jack. And that's if you had a VCR that had four channels of audio in the back. I mean, there were some movies that had directors commentaries, but you had to like take your system apart.

Jonathan Correia:

Wait, what? I didn't know that.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I didn't know that either.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, you had to it would send it through a different a different audio channel and you would have to take cables out, you know, and you had to have a VCR that would read it.

Jonathan Correia:

I know. The other day, I found a VHS that was basically just like the bonus features disk and it was a VHS for MC hammer's song to The Addams Family. And it came with like the music video and a making of doc and like, I think maybe an alternative like music video. It was like the MC Hammer music video and then like The Addams Family music video for the song,

James Jay Edwards:

trying to be thriller.

Jonathan Correia:

I just know, it was the best three bucks I've spent recently.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, well, and that's the thing. Like when I, when I would rent out a bunch at movies, or, you know, there were certain movies that would have their special features after the movie on VHS, you know, you had to play it linearly. But watch the movie and like Stay tuned, because for special features after the credits. Like, you know, like, I try to fake air, like when I was young, like i'd rent the Star Wars movies. And the VHS would have like, you know, kind of making of practical effects stuff after the movie or also, like a lot of specific horror labels would do special features like Full Moon features, you know, they had those making of effects after like all the Puppet Master movies or that sort of thing.

James Jay Edwards:

Now, Korea, you brought up a good point where core fans are keeping this outdated format alive. And it's what's especially funny about it is it's not even, like you can say with vinyl records. They sound better than CDs, but VHS no one's gonna go say and a VHS looks better than even a DVD much less a blu ray or 4k. So it's, it's totally accessibility in in that or the weird special features. What is a note? I think we're all collectors. What's the most any you guys have paid for a VHS tape?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, man. I honestly haven't bought a VHS recently, but I did buy a VHS copy of Michael Mann's The Keep, you know, especially because this was back when you know, I mean, there wasn't even that Australian DVD. And it was because again, you know, it's about accessibility. It's a hard movie to find. And I think I paid like maybe 10 or 20 bucks for it.

James Jay Edwards:

I paid and this is probably this is in the mid 90s before DVD, I mean, DVD was a thing but not as much of a thing. I paid 30 bucks for a VHS copy of Last House on the Left. And I also paid 25 for a VHS copy of Savage Streets

Jonathan Correia:

worth every penny

James Jay Edwards:

savage streets was Last House on the Left. It was like three years later they came out with a DVD for like 10 bucks. I'm like all you gotta be kidding. But you know, these are movies I really wanted to own or in the case of Last House on the Left I really wanted to see it I had never seen it Savage Streets. I had recorded it up off HBO years before and more that tape down so I had to own it.

Benji Carver:

I think it's interesting cuz I mean, the two that I've recently bought were Switchblade Sisters, the Rolling Thunder pictures, one has all this Taranino stuff on top of it, and then Dance With the Devil which is pretty to Durango because that version it there's a DVD of it as well but it is a it is it is the most completely yet not complete. Like there's a couple moments it's still missing. From that and I know Severin is just about to release their blu ray, I just got

Jonathan Correia:

their 4ks of his movies. I haven't watched him yet, but

Benji Carver:

you're in for a ride your ride. You'll definitely need to take a shower afterwards.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I can't wait and watching all the clarity of that restoration.

Benji Carver:

I wish I had my Spanish poster of Savage Streets behind me here today because I that is my proud frame frame of play. Call it

James Jay Edwards:

at one point I saw a guy on Twitter ask What movie do you think you've watched more than anybody else in the world? And my answer is I would not be surprised to learn that I've watched Savage Streets more than anybody else in the world except for maybe the filmmaker because you know clearly they have to watch it more when they're making it but I there was a point when I would watch that maybe twice a day just I would just have it on nothing else would be on TV. I put Savage Streets on and you know go about you know, playing guitar, you know, doing homework or whatever. And savage streets is just hanging out.

Benji Carver:

Well, something I think you touched on Jay I think that's great. Is the you said he had a mic off of HBO rip Lee's the early days of ripping stuff was um when you got that free weekend on HBO Have you got that? My grandma would actually do that for me like she always had cable and she got those free weekends. And so Kingpin is probably the most watched movie I've ever seen, because of that, that in Bio-dome, but I biodome ran out of tape. So the last 10 minutes is always missing. So for a long time, but I think that's something that's also there, that's an established thing, even for myself. You've seen the show now of with what I what I'm doing there is it's kind of giving you that feeling of when you pop in that tape, there's these trailers, there's these extra features that are on there. That's almost like your channel shifting or it's like you don't have that with other media where you can have some tape over something becomes someone's wedding video, or not someone's wedding video. I'm like, we played around with that a lot with our From Dusk Till Dawn episode where it was like, Oh, it's like a stag night like a bachelor party video that just keeps cutting in and out like have found the found footage movie. Like we had like bikers and they need strippers. And then we had like, how to strip you know how to strip video.

Jonathan Correia:

And you did a great job of curating I know Jacob already brought up the short film and I brought up the trailer for flesh and blood, but you also got me to drop almost 30 bucks on a blu ray of Cohen and Tate which I had never heard of before watching that trailer the other night and I was just like, What the fuck is this movie I need and I was not going to pay 30 bucks for a scream factory so I got the arrow video release but

Benji Carver:

well if not to self promote the Patreon we made a special alternative version with Cohen Tate and dual off of Swedish TV rip found and because I felt like in this alternative universe of the hitcher that these two movies would exist kind of thing. We're running out of time so let's actually talk about about what you're you know we don't want to let you out of here before we plug what you're doing because it fits into our theme here.

James Jay Edwards:

What is work mentioned TV let's let's talk about that for a few

Benji Carver:

Warp dimension TV is um let me look up what I put on funny enough on the Patreon what i what i said like what what is it I I really have said it is a fetus last acts TV takeover, secret cinema, mostly live is probably the most accumulated because we're trying to also do not just VHS Wednesdays, but like there are movies that maybe on DVD that are only available to ribbon and talk about what would the VHS mostly of the side of these episodes. It's just to really give a sense of schedule dcommunity. There's some great stuff that is coming out there because of the last year of streamers being able to show you their mixtapes, essentially or what is curated instead of just going to the streaming platforms of like, oh, what's good tonight, it's more like, Hey, we found something that we can build an episode around. And so and for example, tTeh hitcher episode that Korean Jacob saw, it's like what can we build around it? So we have like footage of car crashes we have, you know, things like no trailers to end and yeah, to entice people to Hey, this exists. Um, there's so much great Jennifer Jason Lee movies that were in the 80s. I didn't even know about like, thanks to Brooklyn, I know the book more than the movie, Heart of midnight. I've never even I don't even know this movie, it looks like a David Lynch knock off. But, um, just things like that we just built around it. Um, but then where it came from was this Warp dimension Fest, which I was on. And that we're doing, we pushed it to may 7 to the ninth. It's a three day festival of new material or movies that we could be finding, we don't have a date, we're not like when he's like, we need to find just new stuff. It's just like hidden things. It could be your old family wedding video that turns into a total horror horror movie. So um, we have some stuff coming along. I think what we're finding yourself though, with that festival is we'll have we'll have a good solid three days, but we were a lot longer because I think there was so much material people were trying to get out. And they were stuck inside kind of thing with festivals, and people haven't been able to make as much in the last year. So um, so that's when we kind of shifted into dwarf dimension TV is have a weekly show bring this VHS aspect as well to it. And yeah, and then give you trauma like when I saw and Jacob that's a great example of fear. When I was kid BJ video. That was essentially my library is a little kid that gave me also my biggest fears and weirdest moments of like, this poster that I think might have been like a witchcraft six. You guys remember witchcraft. Oh, yeah. Like there's like a dude. It was like three or four years old as my memory and this guy's getting like blown over a pot. And he's got like a skull on his where his face should be like a skull that's always burned into my memory or blackout where there's a guy in a GIMP outfit, and he's got a zipper. Yeah, I'm just like, oh, blackouts.

Jonathan Correia:

dope. I watched that one recently.

Benji Carver:

So I think the cover is more known than the actual movie. Um and so yeah BJ video being sort of like this beginning of this weird inception of it

James Jay Edwards:

well thanks again Benji Always a pleasure here we need to have you back we need to have you be a three peat. We joked about last time you were on we kept we kept talking for like an hour and a half after you're gone we could have gotten two episodes at you. I have a feeling this is going to be more of the same. But where can we find Warp Dimension TV

Benji Carver:

so two places you can find it I'm always at Another Hole in the Head com or HH com which is sort of the inception of that search to selling juniors work and I we've helped create that he helped create the warp dimension with me together. And then every Wednesday night via zoom right now is we call the zoom underground. You can go to my Instagram or my Twitter and it will be that link for the March we call March VHS madness right now and in the link so we have upcoming as Roadhouse. So I think this is what might come out after Roadhouse but then dance the devil is actually going to be after that the Angel Heart and then existence will be our we're capping it between general decently March kind of on that, but then also our Patreon which is at warp dimension TV I it's really the best deal. I always ask for donations during our live show. But for you know, starting at

7-7:

07 you get curated. Like it's almost like your own mixtapes, or those tapes that you know, like my grandma gave me when I was a kid. I promised to give you the last time as the Bio-dome on that, but I think that's

Jonathan Correia:

not the first 80 minutes just to last 10 minutes about oh, that's it.

Benji Carver:

I love it is it is a special film. Mainly because of Taylor grown. I think Matilda ground is the hidden key to that film. Um, but I think if you if you've missed the live show, you can definitely get the mixed tapes and all the special things as well. But it is it's not like Netflix. It's not like Oh, hey, it's a streaming. It's more like, and you get like, I've been always finding these like crazy, like, you know, international posters, like the Crack House German posters and saying that we just found a Japanese hit your poster. So things like that just to highlight but you'll get movie reviews by me as well. There's a long review. I did The Hitcher my reflection of 20 years of it recently, so it is more just than just like, Oh yeah, it's this next next Netflix subscription kind of thing. So

James Jay Edwards:

could you remind people of what your Twitter and Instagrams are so if they want to find you?

Benji Carver:

So I'm at Twitter, it's @moviehopping. And at Instagram it's at it's @moviehoppingBenji so now they don't have to dig back to find the last episode you were on.

Jonathan Correia:

And and I got a I got to say also with this warp TV when you say that you curate and do stuff before it's not just showing one or two trailers before it that was a solid hour block. Shorts, and commercials and trailers like, like you get your money's worth. Yeah. And then and then you add like an awesome discussion with laser craig after the movie, and then another one right after. So like your night is like scheduled. Yeah, when you join that,

Benji Carver:

I hope people check out the live show the live shows where it's really special. And we try to keep that free right now. For folks, especially but now everyone's going outside to be safe. I'm still I really felt like that. That has always been what has gotten me through these this last year is me and Laser Craig. And George in the beginning, George is great. He's always the man behind the curtain. But he like moves around all the time. Um, but yeah, but I do like to say I would like to say thank you to Georgia selling Jr. And to my grandma, my grandma Lou. She's not with us anymore. But she's definitely I think the person talking to you that really inspired me to create something like this for you all

James Jay Edwards:

on that. Thanks again, Benji, for joining us. We'll have you back. I'm sure that this is we're not done with you. Our theme song is from Restless Spirits. So go check them out and our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go check him out. You can find us at the Eye On Horror Facebook page, @EyeOnHorror Twitter. The @EyeOnHorror Instagram. The iHorror Facebook ihorror.com What else we got Korea?

Jonathan Correia:

I think you got it.

James Jay Edwards:

You're the social media guru.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I also make I make lists on letterboxd of all the movies that are discussed per episode whether it's a quick mention or big digests so if you haven't been listening to the episodes, you can look at it it looks weird, because it's you know, we'll have Like Hereditary right next to Magic Mike double XL. The fuck did they make that connection?

James Jay Edwards:

We were probably talking about sweat

Jonathan Correia:

4DX

James Jay Edwards:

Alright, so um Benji. Thanks again. We will see you guys in a couple of weeks. So for me James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison,

Jonathan Correia:

I'm Jonathan Correia

Benji Carver:

and I'm Benji Carver.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Jonathan Correia:

Wait, wait James don't play the end music yet. Alright, guys, I've been trying to do this a bit secretly with the after music. But I accidentally bought a bootleg of the Anchor Bay release for Dawn of the dead. I don't want this. I actually got it. I got a legit release shortly after. So I'm giving it away for free if you want a free bootleg copy of anchor Bay's release of DAwn of the Dead. It's a good rip. I just don't want to message us on social media, any social media platform, I'll see the message and I'll ship it to you for free. I'll fucking sign it. I want to get rid of this thing. I've been leaving secret messages in these episodes for over a month now. And no one has claimed it. Please get this alright. Cue the music.

Intros
Correia Gives Into Jay and Watches Blair With 2
Jay Finally Gives Into Correia and Watches Gus Van Sant's Psycho
Fantasy Island Reboot
Jacob conquers his The Fear
The Vigil Review
What Has Benji Been Watching?
The Hitcher
VHS: Why We Love An Out Dated Format
Warp Dimension TV
Outros
A Desperate Plea