Eye On Horror

Salem Horror Fest 2024 Recap

May 14, 2024 iHorror Season 7 Episode 6
Salem Horror Fest 2024 Recap
Eye On Horror
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Eye On Horror
Salem Horror Fest 2024 Recap
May 14, 2024 Season 7 Episode 6
iHorror

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This week, the boys review I Saw The TV Glow, Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes, Infestation, Baby Reindeer, Miller's Girl. Correia discovers a new love in D.E.B.S and now lives with the disappointment of there never being a "based on a true story" Planet of the Apes movie.

Then, Jacob takes us to the always-awesome Salem Horror Fest 2024 for their second weekend and reviews Meltdown: A Nuclear Family's Ascension Into Madness, Purgatory Jack, Ghost Game, Carnage for Christmas, as well as some shorts including The Thaw, The Haunted Baby Carriage From Hell, Mira, Red Gloves, Scratch, Bounce House, The Lure, and More!

So many recommendations! Only an hour to give them all! It's all new on EYE ON HORROR!!

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send us a Text Message.

This week, the boys review I Saw The TV Glow, Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes, Infestation, Baby Reindeer, Miller's Girl. Correia discovers a new love in D.E.B.S and now lives with the disappointment of there never being a "based on a true story" Planet of the Apes movie.

Then, Jacob takes us to the always-awesome Salem Horror Fest 2024 for their second weekend and reviews Meltdown: A Nuclear Family's Ascension Into Madness, Purgatory Jack, Ghost Game, Carnage for Christmas, as well as some shorts including The Thaw, The Haunted Baby Carriage From Hell, Mira, Red Gloves, Scratch, Bounce House, The Lure, and More!

So many recommendations! Only an hour to give them all! It's all new on EYE ON HORROR!!

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is Episode 125, otherwise known as season seven, Episode Six. I'm your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host, Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing good. I'm back from my trip on the East Coast and feeling a little jetlag. But good to be back.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, we're gonna hear more about your trip because we're going to talk about Salem Horror Fest today. But before we get to that, let's welcome are your other other hosts Jon Correia. How you in Correia,

Jonathan Correia:

but how great is early but I'm awake ish.

James Jay Edwards:

It's getting harder and harder to find a time when we can all three do this.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Which is weird because I almost never leave the house. So like it's it

James Jay Edwards:

doesn't mean you don't work. I don't leave the house, but I'm always working.

Jonathan Correia:

That's why I don't leave the house. The work from home is great. remote work is great. I don't miss being on set at all. I

James Jay Edwards:

am embracing the hell out of my slippers all day. And you know, oh dog on my lap while I work.

Jonathan Correia:

The wardrobe is giving you know, I mean, I've been wearing my mystic Museum Y2Kills. sweat pants joggers for the last week and a half and it's fantastic. But enough about my hygiene. Let's talk about

James Jay Edwards:

there hasn't been a ton of stuff that's come out since last time we talked but what are you talking about? But there have been some important things. And the big thing that I think all three of us have seen so let's start right off with a bang. I saw the TV glow. Oh yes. This was one of our most anticipated from from our preview of 2024 episode. What do you think

Jonathan Correia:

I felt attacked? Yeah, no, I

Jacob Davidson:

also felt attacked as 90s Kid Yeah, felt very attacked. This reached out of the scream and grabbed me by the throat. Yeah, it's

Jonathan Correia:

it's so I mean, what a great year for sophomore efforts from filmmakers Rose Glass killed it with Love Lies Bleeding and Jane Schoenbrun absolutely killed it with I Saw the TV Glow. But like for what We're All Going to the World's Fairs was for creepy passes. This movie was for like depressed millennials who work who grew up on Are You Afraid of the Dark and Pete and Pete and all that, like?

Jacob Davidson:

i Yeah, it got a wide demo on that one. Yeah, and it definitely emphasizes itself as a trans allegory. But also, I feel that it's relatable for anybody who grew up, particularly in suburbia in the 90s.

James Jay Edwards:

I liked it. I didn't love it. I was I was expecting more from it. And here's the thing, I actually did love it until the ending. And I was not a fan of the ending. And the thing the thing is about this movie is it. It follows one of the characters basically from seventh grade until, until like his mid 40s. And as soon as it gets to the part where it says 20 years later, and then he's in his 40s. That's where I was where I think it kind of, I don't know, it didn't work as well for me. Up until that point, I was loving it. And I was I was just on the edge of my seat and I'm like, Oh yeah, please, please stick this landing. Please stick this landing. And for me, it didn't quite stick that landing because I mean, it's visually just a stunning. It's purely a Jane Schoenbrun movie visually. I mean, it's got that same neon shadow thing that we're all going to the World's Fair had. The score and the soundtrack. Both the diegetic music and the score are just incredible. But yeah, I mean, I loved it until the ending and I you know, I'm not gonna spoil the ending, because there's not that much to spoil, I guess. But I was just not I, it wasn't very satisfying of an ending for me, which, honestly, the movies about a couple of kids who are unsatisfied with the ending of their favorite TV show, so maybe that was part of the point. That's an unsatisfying ending. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

without going too deep into it. I also feel that the ending ties into the trans metaphor, but also the effect and again, you know, it just it also works on kind of general connection of the malaise or dissatisfaction of growing up and yeah, like Jonathan was saying being a depressed millennial. And I also want to talk a little bit about the show off in the movie, the Pink Opaque, because that show looked awesome. And I would have definitely been as obsessed with the pink opaque if I had watched it as a kid. Oh, the

James Jay Edwards:

funny thing about it is when and I'm wondering if this would be the same thing. So I haven't gone back and watched a lot of those shows that I grew up on, really. But when it does go to 20 years later, he goes back and he watches his videotapes of the show. And, and it's so funny because even what they show him watching, is this really cheesy, and it's the same, it's just like the way they edit it, it becomes this cheesy, childish show, whereas when he's watching as a seventh grader, it was actually pretty eerie.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, no, that that that's where I felt the most attack. Because like, because in early in the in the in the movie when they're showing the pink opaque like there's that kind of 90s Canadian produced Nickelodeon aesthetic to it, but it's done really scary like Mr. Melancholy was fucking terrifying for that finale bit in the movie. And there was it was like really great effects like when they first show it and the ice cream man with everything it was like, Oh, wow, this is like big budget version of that. And then they do like a 20 years later, it's all available on streaming. So I watched it again the other day and they show it for what like what it really is which is just like really cheap and cheesy and just like like not great and like felt personally attacked by that because when Goosebumps and I Are You Afraid of Dark first hit streaming? I was like yeah, let's do this. I was watching I'm like, I remember being way more scared by this is the kid and but I was that kid I was that kid that couldn't watch. Are you afraid of the dark? Because it was on when when my parents got home there no kids stuff on TV. It wasn't that it was too scary. So I used to have a friend that would call me after Are You Afraid of the Dark came on and he would tell me what happened in that episode that week. And so I related to that really hard and I was just like, Ah, you got to stop attacking but also, Mr. melancholy. That was that guttural scream at the end though, like I don't want to get into spoiling the ending. But there's a scream towards the end that just like, hit in the chest really hard. Like I felt that like I felt like I've either done that scream in my life or have needed to do release that it was it was a lot. It was a lot. The

James Jay Edwards:

ending to me, it kind of reminded me a little bit of Love Lies Bleeding, whereas Yeah, you're not sure how much of it is actually real and how much of it is in the character's head. But I think Love Lies Bleeding did it a lot better. Or at least a lot more entertainingly. But yeah, I mean, I liked the movie. I just I was expecting to love it. And actually, I did love it. And I think I was just a little let down. I might have expected more from the ending but you know, and

Jacob Davidson:

in terms of new releases, I saw Infested. You guys hear about this that French killer spider movie?

James Jay Edwards:

I've heard about it. When people will be talking about Sting they talk about InFested.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I still haven't seen Sting, but yeah, Infested was goddamn terrifying. It's been a big year for killer spiders. Oh, yeah. That was kind of the Armageddon and Deep Impact of spider releases this year.

Jonathan Correia:

Spiders and monkeys. Yeah, do Okay, now.

Jacob Davidson:

Now we just need a movie about a spider monkey.

Jonathan Correia:

Just the way Give me 50 grand in three weeks?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, just Infested somehow made me even more terrified of spiders. And it's by Sébastien Vaniček. He and he's going to be doing the next Evil Dead or one of the next Evil Dead so I wanted to see what his work was all about to inspire Sainte Marie me to give him that opportunity. And man I am looking forward to it because this movie was goddamn terrifying. It's basically about this punk who buys a like black market spider for his like little collection of animals in in his rundown tenement and of course it gets out but it's like this like hyper advanced, like spider that breeds super fast and it gets bigger and bigger with every spider that births more spiders. So they get trapped in the apartment of them like there's a quarantine so him and his friends at the fight their way out. And there's this insane sequence where they got to make their way through a hallway just covered in webbing and spiders. And it is just so intense. And there is a few bits of dark comedy to it that I can see why Sam Raimi saw this like yeah, I want This guy do an Evil Dead movie.

James Jay Edwards:

How can you not have dark comedy on a killer spider movie?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah, no just somebody opens the big box of spiders it's it's still funny.

James Jay Edwards:

That's interesting it does sound like the the Armageddon and Deep Impact of killer spider movies with Sting because it sounds a lot like are there any diehard sized air vents in it that they crawl through?

Jacob Davidson:

No although the spiders start to die hurt their way through the building and get get through the vents. Oh

James Jay Edwards:

yeah, it does say Where can you see it? Is this streaming somewhere is it now?

Jacob Davidson:

I don't I don't think it's streaming right now. I saw it at Alamo Drafthouse are actually no wait, it's streaming on Shudder. Yeah. Oh, it

James Jay Edwards:

is. I was gonna say this sounds like a Shudder movie. Okay, cool.

Jacob Davidson:

No, I definitely recommend it. And especially if you want a taste of what to expect from Sebastian van six, Evil Dead movie. I feel like this is a pretty good primer,

James Jay Edwards:

killer spiders and monkeys. So let's let's move to monkeys have I know Korea has a story about Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes. Plan of the apes, Jacob? No, I haven't had the chance. I saw it is it's a I mean, it's pretty good. As far as these Planet of the Apes movies go. It's not the best of the franchise, meaning the four newer ones. I still think that, that Dawn is the best. But for me, the third act had a little bit of pacing. But that's because I maybe I just expect more from my third acts. I expect them to be like a roller coaster that you can't get off and kingdom of the planet. The Apes kind of doesn't do that. But it's it's uh, yeah, I mean, it's a Planet of the Apes movie. It's, I mean, it's got the amazing visuals that normally don't. And it's it's set generations. That's what it says generations after Caesar. So it's a couple of 100 years later. And so the apes are, they're building their civilization, they don't quite have the technology that people do. But it's only been 200 years. And people are with the exception of a handful of them. They're pretty much mute. Now. They're basically the primates of the you know, they're the the apes of the new world. And the apes are the people and it's

Jonathan Correia:

still a couple 100 years before Heston and then land on the planet. It's like the middle of it. So that's really exciting. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

you know, it's funny because I rewatched just to make sure that I was up to date I rewatch Rise, Dawn, and War before this. And it's funny because I, I have gone the last few years thinking that Dawn is War, because Dawn is more of a war movie than War for the Planet of the Apes is. So, and I don't know what I thought war was. But for some reason, when I got to dogs, I watched him in order. And I'm like, wait, this one where they're shooting machine guns and drive and tanks is not War for the Planet of the Apes? So I was getting confused with those but but during Rise of the Planet of the Apes, they kept going back to that rocket that's going to go up up into space that they launch up and

Jonathan Correia:

then they have the newspaper that says Lost in Space. Oh, yeah. So

James Jay Edwards:

the Icarus all through all four of these movies now I guess I've been expecting that to land and have the that moment of them land and have it and it hasn't happened yet. I mean, no minor spoiler for Kingdom if it hasn't happened yet,

Jonathan Correia:

again, it's that hundreds of years before the Icarus is supposed to land anyway. So and I think the director of Kingdom has said that this is this is supposed to be the start of a new trilogy, but also like their hopes is that they're not really going to remake the original Planet of the Apes so much as have like the franchise ultimately lead into it, which that excites me because it's like so are the apes gonna get more and more humanoid as we get closer to it, you know, or like human upright standing like they are in the Heston ones. But also like the timelines get murky, but then again, that that series never was really known for like the best continuity and story in history. But it because in the original series too it was all the cats and dogs were killed. And so people took monk- apes as pets, but then apes got smarter, and then they turned into slave labor. And I'm kind of glad that the new franchise went away with that because it was a bit yeah. But I did go try to see Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes yesterday. And it was funny because the one good thing about being your own boss is sometimes you're like, wow, I don't have a whole lot of work to do right now. Maybe I can go catch a matinee on a Thursday. So I went, I went and I saw I Saw the TV Glow. That's fine. I hate that sentence. I saw I Saw the TV Glow there we go. And, and then it was gonna lead right into Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes which was in the same theater, I was in the same seat, It was great. And the previews go they do the stupid you know Nicole Kidman thing and then all sudden like the screen comes up and goes "based on a true story." And I just even he was like, Am I in the wrong theater? Because there's no way there's a Planet of the Apes movie that's based on a true story. And for a moment I existed in a world where there is a Planet of the Apes movie that's based on a true story. And then it went from the files of Winston Churchill that were undisclosed in 2016. They started playing the Ministry of Ungentlemanly where well Warfare, which I heard so ago there's Nazis in this movie? And then like yeah, at AMC, people running around being like, oh, that's he fucked up. Yeah, they started playing the wrong movie. I guess there was a problem with the file or something so ultimately couldn't watch Kingdom but it's fine. I it's A-List they gave me a free popcorn voucher. It's all good. But I don't know if I'll ever recover from the fact that like, the possibility was there that there's a Planet of the Apes movie based on a true story. And now I have to live in a world where that is not possible. And I'm tearing up a little bit man like that hurt so yeah, I went home, kept working. And I instead rewatched Rise and Dawn of went to watch war this weekend before seeing kingdom. But time these plan of the Apes movies will be true someday. Yeah, well, I gotta say, first of all, I don't know if I'll be alive then. Sadly. But the thing I love the Planet of the Apes franchise since one of my favorite, but boy does that that franchise like so much of it should not work. But it does. First and foremost, that first movie should not be called Planet of the Apes, it should be called something completely different. Because the way it's edited, you don't see a single fucking ape for like 20 minutes. And then when it does, it's shot and edited. Like it's a shocking reveal. And I imagine going to see the original Planet of the Apes. And then like you're just thinking it's just some sci fi movie of astronauts crashing and then all sudden, the camera zooms in and the head turns and it's an ape. And you're like, Wait, is this a planet of apes? Holy shit, it would have been cool. But also the Planet of the Apes is a really cool title. So I'm very torn on that. But I think the biggest thing that they tried to sell as James Franco as a believable scientist in Rise because like, boy, boy was that a hard pill to swallow because like, don't get me wrong the emotional bits he's really good with like John Lithgow and Caesar and all that. But there's times where he's talking about the science shit where it's like, okay, Pineapple Express. I don't think so. Like no. This isn't believable, man. Like if you're talking about different weed strands, maybe but like, but still, Dawn is really good. And Dawn's the same thing. Because Don is so well done. Oh to that opening of Dawn when they have the music homage cue to 2001. When they're going through the forest, I would say that I was just like, I'm in it. I'm in it. And then it got to the point where I'm like, This is so beautifully done. So well done. But also there's a scene where there's a monkey duel wielding machine guns riding a horse shooting at accomplished Shakespearean actor Gary Oldman, Who's firing fucking rockets at gorillas like, it's stupid. That's a stupid thing I just said, but it's so good. It's so good. And that's that's the Planet of the Apes franchise. It's just like, this is a stupid thing that we're spending a ton of money on. And it works it when I tell you. Well, the reveal of Caesar riding a horse in Rise is one of my favorite cinematics right up there with the reveal of the Doof Warrior. In in Fury Road. It's like there's there on the Golden Gate Bridge. And there's just this fog and this and then he's now out. Of course, you're like, yes, apes on horses. Dude, when I was watching Rise last night, I was like, very 5050 with it, but like, Man, I gotta say if there's if there's some. I think my main issues with Rise is there's too many parts of it that feel too safe, where it's like, Oh, of course the guy in the monkey enclosure played by Draco Malfoy is going to be a bad guy. It's like you made the safe choice of picking the obvious. You know what I mean? Stuff like there's a few safe choices. But when it hits it hits hard because like when Caesar says no, for the first time, I got chills, my nipples got hard. I got I got the chills. I heard Roddy McDowell telling the story of Caesar from the original planets, Planet of the Apes franchise. Like it just started immediately playing in my head of him saying. And he stood up and said the one word against man row. I was like, ah, like it still hits hard. So like, yeah, Rise is still great. It's still a great movie, but like Donna's I'm looking forward to watching the next two. That's a certain dawn I

James Jay Edwards:

think is the most solid of the original trilogy. It's the Empire Strikes Back.

Jacob Davidson:

So that's a good way of putting it.

Jonathan Correia:

Now. Speaking of apes or ape like creatures. I did get to finally see Sasquatch Sunset, and I gotta say it cured my depression that day. Let me tell you that was everything I ever wanted. Riley Keough deserves all the acting awards and I'm not even being sarcastic the fact that she was able to sell that much emotion and that much like tone through the Sasquatch makeup and prosthetics insane. What a fantastic movie. Yeah, it was, it was everything I ever wanted from a Sasquatch movie, which was just Sasquatches, is being Sasquatches, is you know just just Samsquanches living out their life. And it's

Jacob Davidson:

and also now that you've seen it, I could finally talk about probably the funniest scene in the movie to me with where the one Sasquatch, gets bitten by the turtle. Yeah, you know what I'm talking about. And then and then he starts yelling at it like the phone. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

My favorite part was the little Samsquanch because that little fucker, like there would be. There is one scene where it's just like build up scene where like the female Samsquanch is struggling on like, the shore of this river, right? And then Jesse Eisenberg Samsquanch, like fucking around on a log or something. And it's edited like this really, like something bad's about to happen, and the scene just keeps going on and on and on. And you can't tell is it going to be the female Samsquanch, or is it going to be the male Samsquanch, which one is going to something bad, something bad's about to happen, and the entire time that little fucker is in the background, just like throwing rocks into the river? Like not not, completely oblivious.

James Jay Edwards:

You don't mean the baby when you mean the adolescent? Because there because there isn't. Yeah, yeah, there

Jonathan Correia:

was a baby thats born. Okay. No, no, the adolescent one. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

My favorite scene is still when when they find the logging road, and they let out every bodily fluid they possibly

Jacob Davidson:

do. They're so mad about that road,

Jonathan Correia:

you know, I'll be I'll be honest, I My schedule is so fucked. Sometimes like micro naps happen. And I like my eyes closed for a moment. I clocked it was only a minute or so. And it was right before that. So I basically head down for moment and then went hmm. And it was literally that road scene. And I just went the fuck? Because I mean, like I just added to the confusion but yeah, Samsquanch Sunset, best picture, Best Actress and also

Jacob Davidson:

like it's just amazing the work that went into it because I went to the screen with a q&a and they were saying that Jesse Eisenberg got the Marcel Marceau, the famous French mimes choreographer to do all those movements for the Samsquatches.

Jonathan Correia:

That's incredible. I have I have some charcoal drawings of Marcel Marceau in our house. Yeah, that's awesome. I didn't know that. Yeah, yeah, it was just done so. So well. Need more.

James Jay Edwards:

Another new release. I saw. Have you guys heard about Miller's Girl.

Jonathan Correia:

That's the one that everyone's being all like, ah, gap ickies. About Yeah, it's

James Jay Edwards:

it's Martin Freeman is like an English teacher in this. It's a high school like a prep school. And Jenna Ortega is kind of the little Lolita femme fatale. Well, Sr. and minor spoiler, she kind of plays him. She she's really smart. She's one of like, the star pupils. And so she's, he's, she's like a really talented writer. So he kind of takes her under his wing and, you know, mentors her and gives her extra assignments and stuff like that. And there. Yeah, it goes about as well as you would think with between a teacher and a student. But, you know, when they make a movie about it, but it you know, by the end of it, you know, you're kind of feeling sorry for Martin Freeman. Because he, I mean, he's not completely innocent, but he's also not the bad guy that he's been made out to be, in a lot of ways. I don't know. It's, I mean, it doesn't go completely fatal attraction or anything, but it's Jenna Ortegas character is pretty manipulative. Let's just say that. But yeah, it's, it's, it's a crazy one. It's not quite horror, but, you know, just

Jacob Davidson:

in terms of straight up horror, I was at the 45th anniversary screening of Alien that they were doing for like AMC, and, of course, still a classic. But what was cool is that before the movie, they did an interview, or rather Fede Alvarez did an interview between himself and Ridley Scott, where they talked about the original movie and a lot of the making of the movie and even discussed a little bit of how that played into his upcoming and are very highly anticipated. Alien Romulus. Yes I'm, I continue to be extremely hyped for it as a direct Alien film. And, yeah, also the 4k Alien DCP looks and sounds amazing, you know, you just hung on every sound. And it's it's fun seeing a repertory screen like that. And just watching people get scared so badly they jump in their seats like I still saw people jump during the chestburster scene. It's so great

Jonathan Correia:

seeing it because I went to the Egyptian screening of Alien and it's just such a great crowd movie to watch with, especially ones that are like, very attentive and into it. Like it's so fun seeing the reactions and like the scale like when they go into the what is it the creators room, you know, and it's just Space Jockey, Space Jockey. There we go. The Space Jockey seeing and seeing that on a giant screen is always just like incredible. Oh, yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I went to a midnight screening of Alien a few years back, when the theater that did midnight screens around here was still around. And the scene that really got people then even people who had seen the movie before is Dallas's demise in the air vents when he Oh, yeah. It's right on top you and he turns around and you know, oh, yeah, right there. That was that's the scary see. Jazz hands.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and it's and what's really scary is you don't see what happened to him. At least it in the theatrical cut. Know

James Jay Edwards:

It. Yeah, it cuts right there. But you know, you know, because it cuts to them with his flame thrower going. And this is all we found. You have to have either you guys watched that Netflix series, Baby Reindeer?

Jonathan Correia:

No, no, but I've heard a lot of the controversy, or Yeah, it's stuff around it.

James Jay Edwards:

It's weird because it is, um, it's ostensibly, it's funny, because I was telling my wife about it after I was three episodes in and I'm like, Oh, it's a movie about a dude who gets a stalker. And then literally, the next episode I watched, it turned into much more than that. And I don't want to give anything away. But basically, there's this comedian who, he's a comedian. So he has to have a day job. And his day job is as a bartender, and this woman comes into his bar, and he's nice to her. So she starts stalking him, basically. And this opens up a huge floodgate of stuff in his past and hers, that that just all boils to the surface. And it's based on a true story that the writer director actor had, you know, really went through in his life. And at one point, he, this is where I say it, the stuff from his past boils up, he is sexually abused by a very prominent British television writer. And that's one of the things people are trying to figure out who this is that that abused him if people have all their theories and stuff and this guy's not talking he's like No, no, I'm never gonna say I'm never gonna say but Correia you said that they found the woman the stalker, someone found out who it was. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, I guess it's very passing what I've been saying about it because I try to avoid spoilers for things I might watch and you know, I've been hearing good things about so bit or at least that a lot of people are watching you know, Baby Reindeer and all that but I have been seeing like the him coming out and saying Hey, guys, don't try to find the lady like leave them alone. You know, all this stuff. But like, that's not going to help that's only going to fan it and then apparently Yeah, Piers Morgan interviewed her and like now she's suing Netflix for defamation and stuff because they it's based on that but like is very not true. A lot of it like I said, I didn't really look into it too much. In case of spoilers, he's

James Jay Edwards:

come out and said that the depiction of her in the show is not like what she is and so that leads me to believe physically, or like, you know, her personality wise I didn't really get the impression that the stalking was fun because Because eventually she does face consequences for it. So it must have been bad unless the consequences were made up for the screen as well but yeah, I can see the person that that character is based on not being happy with how they're depicted.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh yeah, who whoever wants to be depicted in that light you know, as a stalker as a as a professional stalker myself I personally wouldn't want to see that

James Jay Edwards:

be depicted as a stalker. I wasn't saying oh, well,

Jonathan Correia:

you're only a stalker if you get a charge but like me and Lucy were cool. No. I have a new favorite movie and it's it's older and it's only loosely connected to the genres we cover. But you know what? Have you guys ever seen D.E.B.S. the The Spy spoof movie that came out in 2004 No,

Jacob Davidson:

I didn't see it but I've heard a lot about it. So, D.E.B.S.

Jonathan Correia:

is this like Charlie's it. It was advertised as a low budget Charlie's Angels rip off that was geared more towards horny male teenagers which is why I never really watched it I was like this looks bad. It's it follows a team of teenage crimefighting super spies that are like in super spy school and they're going after like this main villain right very typical story. The advertisement is completely wrong. This movie was written, directed and edited by a lesbian person of color. And it is so campy it is so it has so much queer humor in it and its central story is a love story between one of the main girls and the arch villain who is played by Jordanna Brewster and her teammates also include like Meghan Good and Devin Okie as well and it also stars like Jimmy Simpson, Holland Taylor, Michael Clarke Duncan like this. The cast is stacked and it is so much fun it's such a fun movie. I highly recommend seeking out D.E.B.S. and it's spelt kind of with like the periods in it like M.A.S.H. D.E.B.S. do with dots in them. But let me tell you, Debs was such a pleasant surprise. I had so much fun with it. So if you're if you're a fan of like, spy movies, Charlie's Angels movies or just queer cinema like the D.E.B.S. is a hell of a fun time. Like, oh, man, there's a there's a great scene where like the main spy girl who's starting the relationship with the with the mega villain. One of them catches their interests like, cure us. She's like, it's not what you think. No, I think you're a slut like No, no, it's not we think she's like at a gay slut at that, it's like I'm telling you go go find I think it's the DVDs a bit hard to find right now. But like, I'm sure if you check record stores or thrift shops or digitally like you'll find it somewhere because it this thing deserves like a criterion 4k it is so much fun. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

I've heard it loaded along with, But I'm a Cheerleader and movies like that.

Jonathan Correia:

It's it's that kind of like campy tone but with like spy stuff. It's yeah, it's it's really it's the love story is genuinely sweet, like and genuinely like, like believable. It's good.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and speaking of movies with camp and a genuinely sweet romantic storyline, I also rewatched Sam Raimi, Spider-Man 3 as a part of that re release. And, you know, it'll held up a lot better than I remembered like, I saw it in high school and I was pretty disappointed but now it's actually pretty solid Spider-Man superhero movie.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it's a bit bloated.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah, that's definitely overstuffed due to studio mandate, but it works a lot better than I remembered.

Jonathan Correia:

I always say like the the Sandman was done so well in Spider-Man 3. It's really sad that like, it kind of gets distracted with like, five other villains. But

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, three villains is too many villains for one movie that that is a lesson that has been learned before.

Jonathan Correia:

Has it though, because we still keep doing it.

Jacob Davidson:

That's yeah, but ya know, but for what it is. Sam Raimi really managed to stick the landing for for as best he could under the circumstances because it it does kind of bring the Mary Jane, Peter, and Harry romantics subplot to ahead. And also even though it was mandated, he did a pretty you did a pretty good job with Venom and I like how it kind of moves around like a claw. And, ya know, but the same and stuff like the effects still look astounding. It's, it's incredible. And also it has one of my favorite, Bruce Campbell cameos where he's the snooty French waiter. Yeah, yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I wonder if anybody's noticed all the different roles that Bruce Campbell is played in? In the Spider Man movies just you know, hey, wait, that wrestling ring announcer is also the scenery French waiter and he's a street guy.

Jonathan Correia:

And then he's what is it in Dr. Strange multiverse

Jacob Davidson:

Pizza Papa! feeds Yeah, but the pizza balls and then Dr. Strange makes him beat himself up because it's Sam Raimi movie.

Jonathan Correia:

Nothing was better than going to see that Doctor Strange movie opening weekend and everyone sticking around for like the post credit scene thinking they're setting something up and it's just Bruce Campbell's continuing to punch himself. Like seeing a roomful of Like you could tell who was like the Sam Raimi fans and who were the Marvel fans because like the Marvel people were waiting like, and all the Raimi fans just like went fucking nuts. Yeah, exactly. No, I did. I was just like, Yes. More Campbell.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, let's let's spend the rest of the episode talking about Salem horror fest, which Jacob was at last weekend. How was that? Would you see see anything good? Oh,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, it was great. And yeah, I only got to attend the second weekend. And yeah, the other there was a lot of good stuff at the first week and I wish I could have saw and, ya know, I'm a big fan of Salem Horror Fest last year. Myself and director Robert Tiemstra had a short in The October martyr. This year, we were just attending because we liked Samlem Horror fest. And I've got family nearby, so I just stayed with them.

James Jay Edwards:

And this is Salem Oregon right.

Jacob Davidson:

No Salem, Massachusetts. How dare you?

James Jay Edwards:

Sorry, I couldn't resist

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah, I really, I really do appreciate what Salem Horror fest does, because it really gives a foundation for a lot of up and coming especially LGBTQ filmmakers, and just in general horror filmmakers who are kind of working down to the wire and it allows us to see a lot of interesting movies we would not otherwise be able to experience and this year was kind of split up across several different locations like they did some screenings at the Salem public access television building and they did some screenings at this kind of goth clothing store called Die With Your Boots On and they even had screenings at the Peabody Essex Museum so I gotta let exercise as who you know, just running around

James Jay Edwards:

let's just take a second to appreciate that amazing name of a goth clothing store die with your boots on Oh

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, no, it's great. I mean,

Jonathan Correia:

can you can you own a goth clothing store and not have like, either the most ambiguous like dark title like absolute absurdity or like something where it's like crazy like that like it almost it's kind of like how every dog wash company has to be some form of a pun. Oh

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, no, I mean like if your dog watching company got out of pun if you're a golf clothing store you got to just like be like one word like bleak or just yeah like play on words you know with die if your boots on and they had some good boots, boot

Jonathan Correia:

scootin boogie down to

James Jay Edwards:

I was thinking the Iron Maiden song die with your boots on so that's the difference versus die with your boots on.

Jonathan Correia:

who grew up in the woods, how to tell who grew up in the woods without saying

James Jay Edwards:

little as a little heavy metal hesher

Jacob Davidson:

ADHD. But anyway, ya know, there were a lot of great films this year. I guess I'll highlight I could have highlighted a few. The first one I saw and one that I haven't been able to stop thinking about since it's called

Meltdown:

A Nuclear Family’s Ascension into Madness. And it's basically said some time in the 50s. It's about these two political families in this small town in the 1950s. And they're having a dinner party, but somebody has spiked the drinks with LSD. So they start to unwittingly trip balls, and a lot of darkness gets unleashed in the process. And it's it was a very kind of small production like it's almost felt like a stage show. And it can be best described as Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf on acid in the most literal sense. And it was by Colton van til, and I really dug it. There was a lot of interesting visuals as the family gets more and more into their trip. At the same time, there are also some funny lines like this bit where one of the wives he was listening to record saying, This music is like speaking to be in Technicolor. So the point of that but then gets intense to like, this other guy who's running for mayor starts talking about and World War Two, how he was allowed a POW to celebrate Christmas with them, and then they had to fight over a gun and it was really disturbing. It just it just resonated with me and visually striking. So again, these are all festival movies. I'm not exactly sure when they're coming out but definitely check them out on letterbox or put a book bookmark on them because there's going to be plenty of fascinating films coming out of Salem this year.

James Jay Edwards:

Are these shorts or Features?

Jacob Davidson:

not all of them. Although I did go to the shorts block, and I did see some fun ones there, like others, this one called The Haunted Baby Carriage From Hell, which was about this gay couple that moves into a haunted house. And there's this like old timey Victorian baby carriage that keeps on going around and bothering them. But it doesn't really do anything except bug them. So just kind of ruins like their dinner parties or just makes people think that they're going to try and have a baby, which just kind of pisses them off. So it was a pretty funny horror comedy short. And oh, there was this really cool. Stop Motion anime made a movie called Mira by Eva Louise Hall, which was about a street performer who plays accordion, who becomes friends with a mysterious other street performer who does music. And it becomes kind of a reflection of like this starving artist or like the pain of being a musician. And it has had kind of a Henry Selick vibe to it. So you know this, it looked really cool and had a very spooky aesthetic. And let's see, in terms of Giallo fair, there was a short GL throwback called Red Gloves, which was about a dance troupe in the 1980s in New York City. And the top dancer is being stalked by a person with red gloves. And I love the poster. Again, very throwbacky and it even has a tagline dancing yourself to death by Santiago Saba saying, oh, yeah, that sounds dope as hell. Yeah, no, no, no, some amazing shorts in the block. And a couple more I particularly have to mention, there's one called The Lore, which puts the short and short it's only two minutes, including credits. And it's by Tony hip. Well, it's about a guy going fishing at night fly fishing. And he has his bait. And something happens. Don't want to give it away. But yeah, it's only two minutes, but it's managed to fit some a couple scares and some laughs in that short timeframe. And there was also an intervals block for like shorts that were 15 minutes or longer. So you know, they're not quite a feature not quite as short. Probably my personal favorite is this one called Bounce House, which is about the apocalypse, like civilizations ended and almost everybody's dead. And it's about this girl, who is just kind of riding out the apocalypse by herself and she's got and she's living in a bounce. Well, she's playing around at a bounce house wall like the world's ended around her, and then this survivalists girl meets up with her, and they kind of figure out what their next steps are, and also just kind of unwind from the apocalypse by just bouncing around a bounce house and is by Christopher J. Ewing and Kelly Blum. And again, just really kind of nailed that balance between horror and comedy. And, yeah, you know, the world ends you know, why not just mess around with a bounce house while everything's falling apart around you? I said, Really, Doug, this kind of throwback period horror movie called The Thaw by Sean Temple and Sarah Wizner which set in Yeah, Jonathan, you appreciate this as a New England horror. Basically, it's the 19th in 19th century Vermont. The Winter's coming and this family has this technique to survive the winter where they take kind of a sleeping potion in order to hibernate through for the winter, but they only have enough for the parents and the young daughter is going to have to try and survive the winter and take care of them. But like the dad gets thought out too early, and it's not good. Like, shit goes bad head,

Jonathan Correia:

always down for some New England horror, so I'm super down for that. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm calling CPS on those parents. They're just gonna go to sleep and leave their kid to fend for herself. Well,

Jacob Davidson:

like teen she's like a teenager but still Yeah, it's like, especially the Vermont winter in the 1800s it's not not a fun time.

Jonathan Correia:

I like teenage in the 1800s that's like mid 30s. Oh, right. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

True. Survive low ages survivability. So you gotta grow up fast.

Jonathan Correia:

It's not selfish. Making your teenager work. I mean, that's just New England. You know? It's a I old enough to work. Cool.

James Jay Edwards:

That's the equivalent of a middle aged kid. Taking care of their elderly parents, I

Jacob Davidson:

guess pretty much, basically. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, as if that traditionally, I mean, that mindset has been in New England since up until at least 2004. So pretty much, we only just started matching everyone else's timeline once the internet got a little better and around 2008 2009 ish. That's when our dial up really like picked up steam. That's

James Jay Edwards:

what you were for dial up DSL.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, how times change. We ran

Jonathan Correia:

out of the AOL discs, the free trials so all of New England had to update

Jacob Davidson:

That's just how it goes. And let's say there was this other grade interval short called Scratch by Michael janati. As basically about a father son duo taking the RV out to the woods to you know, camp and bond. And it's a full moon. And I think you can imagine where I'm going with this, like, werewolf crashes their camp out, as always. Yeah. And it's and it was a incredible, really tightly wound, werewolf horror story, because, I mean, it's just like, father and son, like the keys are outside and the Wolf's outside, but they have to somehow figure out a way to get the keys and stop the werewolf from getting in the RV. So it was a very well done survival story and the effects on the werewolf itself, especially for short, we're very well done. And yeah, I saw most mostly shorts are like a big chunk of what I saw at Salem horror fest for that weekend were shorts. But the worst, I did see a few more features that were pretty cool. Like I I personally liked this very out there, kind of Neo noir called Purgatory Jack, where it's by Brett and Butler and Jason G Butler, the butler brothers. And it's about this kind of afterlife where anybody commits suicide is like in this kind of industrial wasteland. And it's kind of a Casablanca area where like, where there is like this 1920s detective who goes by the name Purgatory Jack does cases for new arrivals to this afterlife. And there's a there's like an underworld like a criminal underworld where these like bikers exchange in body parts because it's like, they're all dead. So like, a lot of them need new body parts. And this Popstar dies and is trying to figure out why she's there. And also if somebody she knows is in Purgatory, so it leads to this kind of caper, because she's still not technically dead. And there's these rules where like, she's got enough life enter that all these other like dead people want to, like get her lifeforce. And like, I'm always a fan of these types of kind of world building supernatural, low budget movies, especially dealing with the afterlife. So I have a lot of charm. And yeah, there's a lot of amputation and bodily dismemberment. So you know, you can't go wrong there, especially with these mix of characters because it's like you got a 1920s Detective fighting these kind of Hells Angels, ghouls. And let's see another highlight. There is this interesting kind of take on haunted house slash home invasion movies called Ghost Game by Jill Gevargizian. And it was produced by Eduardo Sanchez, who did the Blair Witch Project and is written by horror writer. Adams is there and it's basically about these 20 Somethings aimless slackers who decided to do this new internet challenge called the ghosts game where you break into people's houses and you pretend to be a ghost so you like mess with the people inside and like move stuff. Or, you know, you readjust the like temperatures on the water here you're just like messed with stuff so that they think that their house is haunted. And like this group of kind of amature goes gamers decide to do this in a haunted house where this are like an allegedly haunted house where this author and his family are moving in so we can work on his new novel. And it was very interesting like it played with the sub genres so much he couldn't tell like where it was going into either territory and also like, where the subversion slide also had a fantastic opening cameo by Dr. Rebecca McKendree. Like talking about out the haunted house in question as kind of a like documentarian, always good to have that. That sounds

Jonathan Correia:

like my kind of like, messing with people just go and just like little slight moving stuffs and little mischievious is,

James Jay Edwards:

is that a feature? Yeah, it's

Jacob Davidson:

a feature. It's being released by Dread. Oh,

James Jay Edwards:

cool. Okay, good. So we'll be able to see that soon. Okay. Yeah, cuz that sounds good.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, again, these are all just festival circuit movies. So you know, there'll be out sooner or later. And see I got a couple more. Are you guys familiar with the works of Alice Maio Mackay. Sounds familiar. Well, she's a trans filmmaker from Australia. And yeah, she's done a ton of feature length movies. Despite being so young, like she did, T blockers, So Vam, Bad Girl Boogy. Yeah, I

Jonathan Correia:

just saw T Blockers the other day. Yeah. Nice. I was like that name sounds really familiar. I think I saw something. I love T Blockers. So this is a new one from her.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and it's funny I saw T Blockers at last year Salem Horror Fest. So yeah, that Alice is really keeping her movie coming in through Salem Horror Fest. And yeah, no, it's a Christmas slasher, about a true crime. podcaster, who goes back to her hometown, for Christmas to see her sister. And she's trans and it's like this small kind of backwater town so like, people keep on giving her shit. And there's also this, like, kind of urban legend about a toymaker who dresses as Santa Claus and went on a killing spree. And when she comes back, the killings begin again. And so she decides to investigate and try and figure out who the who the real killer is. And yeah, it was a fun setup. You know, as you know, Christmas slashers are classic plotline. But I think it really stood out on its own. Like there's even like some kind of small town horror because like, deals with like just kind of the general assholes who run the town and you know, like her kind of unite with her friends to try and stop the killings. Also, it was edited by the People's Joker's Vera drew which really added to kind of more fantastical qualities to it, especially when there's like a flashback or like dream or nightmare sequence. And you basically got to do it in a creepy ceramic, Santa Claus mask and red suit going around smashing people with a hammer. That's

Jonathan Correia:

awesome. I love T blockers a lot. And just like the a lot of the indie films that are being made by trans filmmakers, and yeah, how they're getting so good and I love seeing filmmakers like her who are just like, getting better with each film. It makes me really hopeful that someday we might get a man hunt TV show like Last of Us, man hot by Gretchen Felker Martin. Oh, yeah, yeah. Oh, man, dude, all I want is like a big budget TV adaptation of that and video games because I think it would be cool. Granted, they're very it's a very graphic book, but it would be

Jacob Davidson:

I've seen the cover and it is very suggestive. Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

the the end of the world that's back. Yeah, there's, there's there's a lot of testicle stuff in there. It's great.

Jacob Davidson:

And, yeah, the last thing I did at Salem horror Fest was attend a repertory screening of Tales from the Crypt Presents Demon Knight, which was co hosted by the podcasts. Girl That Scary and flirty massacre podcast and they did an episode which they called a girl that's a massacre. So it was it was kind of fun on that but it was just really cool that they were able to screen Demon Knight in a place like the Peabody Essex Museum so that like it was good screening area. And also just there's something funny about seeing something like Demon Knight at a museum. And it was also fun for me, particularly because, well, Rob had never seen Demon Knight before. And I'd also invited a bunch of friends of mine from high school who were in the who were still nearby to come with us to watch it. So I got to see it with a bunch of people never seen before. And just in general, Demon Knight is such a blast with a crowd. So is it's always a good time, especially Billy Zane. You know, just humans. You're not worth the flesh. You're pregnant on

Jonathan Correia:

Mandy. Ernest Dickerson is one of the like unsung masters Oh yeah, like I everything is surviving the game. I mean, come

Jacob Davidson:

by Bone. He owns that movie rules. Bones is so fucking good. Sure is. not. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I huge, huge praise through and and all the work he's done but yeah Demon Knight especially it's just it's so much fun. It set the bar too high for the Tales from the Crypt movies.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, kind of a downward spiral you know with Bordello of blood which fun in some ways but not as good as demon night. And then Ritual.

Jonathan Correia:

Woof. I feel like that. I feel like that when they slapped on the name after it. I'm pretty

James Jay Edwards:

sure they did. It feels like it. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. So again, Salem Horror Fest is one of my favorite horror film festivals made it out again this year. And hopefully I'll make it out next year because they always got a great selection and I gotta give a big shout out to Kay. She's doing fantastic job running the fest and can't wait to see what the future holds.

Jonathan Correia:

Kay rules. We're big fans. Oh, yeah. All

James Jay Edwards:

right. And with that, let's call this one an episode. But before we go, we do need to do one quick shout out. And I don't know how Correia feels about this. But our buddy Glen Douglas Packard is going to be directing. What is it Mickey VS. Winnie? Is that Yeah. Well, you don't know how Correia feels about this. My buddy's making a movie. I'm excited that I know how you were kind of anti Winnie the Pooh or the blood and Honey what I see this as is basically this isn't an inevitable movie. You know, as soon as Steamboat Willie went public domain someone was going to make this and I'm glad it's Glenn. And I'm glad it's happening this soon. It's like we're just like all you know, let's get this out there now. Yeah, it's gonna be awesome.

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know how Glen and Anthony kept that secret from us. But I was like, What the hell, guys? I had to learn for dateline. You're making a

James Jay Edwards:

deadline? Yeah. Dang it. Oh, that's awesome. But anyway, I keep an eye out for that. Glenn Douglas Packard. Is it an iHorror production? Or is Anthony

Jacob Davidson:

I believe so. I mean, they're producing it, I think.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, I know Anthony's producing it but yeah, that's the way I see it as this movie is inevitable. And I'm glad that Glenn's getting to make it because it's it's gonna be awesome.

Jonathan Correia:

I've been harassing him for years. When's the when's his follow up to Pitchfork gonna happen? I did not expect this to be the follow up but

James Jay Edwards:

in a this is what Alien VS Predator, Freddy vs. Jason now you got Mickey VS. Winnie.

Jonathan Correia:

It's, it's gonna be a fun time.

James Jay Edwards:

It's gonna be good. So okay, and with that, we'll call this an episode. So our our theme songs by Restless Spirits ago. Give them a listen. And our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go give him a look. And you can find us on any of the socials under Eye On Horror or at iHorror.com which you can also find the latest on Mickey VS. Winnie. And we'll see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your eye On horror.

Intros
The Boys Review I Saw The TV Glow (in Theaters)
Jacob Reviews Infested 2024 (On Shudder)
Jay Reviews Kingdom Of the Planet of the Apes (In Theaters)
Planet of the Apes - Based on A True Story
Correia Finally Watches Sasquatch Sunset (In limited Theaters)
Jay Reviews Miller's Girl (On Netflix)
Jacob Goes to 45th Anniversary Screening of Alien
Jay Reviews Baby Reindeer (On Netflix)
Correia Discovers a New Favorite Movie in D.E.B.S. (2004)
Jacob Revisits Spider-Man 3 Theatrically
Jacob Goes to Salem Horror Fest 2024!!!
Jacob Reviews Meltdown: A Nuclear Family’s Ascension into Madness (SHF)
Jacob Reviews Short Films From Salem Horror Fest
Jacob Reviews Purgatory Jack (SHF)
Jacobs Reviews Ghost Game (SHF)
Jacob Reviews Carnage for Christmas (SHF)
Demon Knight Fucking Rules! (SHF Screening)
A Mickey VS. Winnie Movie!?!?!
Outros
Restless Spirit Goes Hard ASF