Eye On Horror

Blowing Razzberries

March 11, 2024 iHorror Season 7 Episode 3
Blowing Razzberries
Eye On Horror
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Eye On Horror
Blowing Razzberries
Mar 11, 2024 Season 7 Episode 3
iHorror

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This week, the boys are catching up on some older titles! Jay binges The Leftovers and reviews Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman's The Fantastic Four, Jacob attends a screening of Django with Franco Nero and some of his favorite recent SOV movies, while Correia visits a Troll in Colorado and raves about Richard Fleischer's 10 Rillington Place. 

Then the boys get into the main topic: The Razzies. Meant to be a satirical opposite to the Oscars, do the Razzies succeed in calling out the film industry or are they just a lazy exercise for trolls to punch down? Can it be doing both? Join the debate on an ALL NEW EPISODE OF EYE ON HORROR! 

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

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Send us a Text Message.

This week, the boys are catching up on some older titles! Jay binges The Leftovers and reviews Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman's The Fantastic Four, Jacob attends a screening of Django with Franco Nero and some of his favorite recent SOV movies, while Correia visits a Troll in Colorado and raves about Richard Fleischer's 10 Rillington Place. 

Then the boys get into the main topic: The Razzies. Meant to be a satirical opposite to the Oscars, do the Razzies succeed in calling out the film industry or are they just a lazy exercise for trolls to punch down? Can it be doing both? Join the debate on an ALL NEW EPISODE OF EYE ON HORROR! 

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is episode 122 Otherwise known as season seven episode three. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing fine. Just, you know Sunday morning and ready to do another episode with you guys.

James Jay Edwards:

You feeling better from your from your not COVID flu?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, there's more than one disease. And yeah, yeah, no, I'm feeling much better than the flu really kicked my ass. But ya know, I got tested multiple times. It wasn't COVID And, yeah, although I am glad I was vaccinated for the flu because even with it like it just kicked my ass.

James Jay Edwards:

I feel like you had a harder time with the flu than I did with COVID because my COVID just felt like a bad cold but your flu I mean, you look and sound better so I can tell that it really kicked your ass back then.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I'm I had a fever and I feel like it was elevating my hair because like I looked like a Eraserhead everyday while I was sick.

James Jay Edwards:

Also with us, as always is your other other host Jon Correia. How you doing Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I'm so tired. I'm so exhausted, boys. I mean, I'm in Colorado right now. So I'm an hour ahead of you guys. So I got to supposedly sleep in a little bit, but I did it. But like Yeah, the last week has been over the last couple of weeks has been incredible and tiring. And I can't wait to share any news that might come out of it. But for now, just know. Your boy is working his ass off and is verys tireds.

James Jay Edwards:

You're you're setting me up for my dad joke of you're in the future.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, you want the lotto? You want the lotto numbers? Whoo.

Jacob Davidson:

But have you have you seen Sasquatch there?

Jonathan Correia:

I didn't see a SAMsquanch but I did see trolls because if you guys didn't know there's this artist who made these giant wooden trolls and all these different parts. It was like a big project. It was Thomas Damco look it up there. They're pretty freakin incredible. And one of them is out here in Breckenridge, Colorado. And they're so cool because they're just like gentle giants like he's just chillin there he's got his arm around a tree this thing is like twice my height. I said I sent the boys some pictures here I might post when we when we post the episode but ya know, just see you know taking pictures with trolls Have we done a trolls episode I want to do I want to talk more about trolls. We

Jacob Davidson:

got on the right opportunity to do troll trolls episode. And

Jonathan Correia:

don't forget they are making a trolls to a troll to for that awesome kaiju movie that came out about a year or so ago.

James Jay Edwards:

I just think they made a Troll 2 it's the Best Worst Movie ever.

Jonathan Correia:

That's trolls to or wait yeah, that too. And then Jays got his favorite trilogy of all time there. But yeah, just just sleeping a lot hanging out with trolls. I got a a book about Rasputin in that I'm looking forward to read you know, just live in living the best life I guess. What have you guys been watching?

James Jay Edwards:

There hasn't been a whole lot of horror that's come out since last we talked. But I have been binging through The Leftovers. Have either you guys watched the leftovers? No, no,

Jonathan Correia:

it was residual annoyance with the hype around Lost. So when Leftovers came out, I was like am I'm all set. That's

James Jay Edwards:

the thing it's Damon Lindelof or however you say his name

Jacob Davidson:

Damon Lindelof

James Jay Edwards:

Damon Lindelof. Yeah, who had his hand in Lost and let me tell you, The Leftovers definitely sticks the landing a lot better than Lost, a lot better, which isn't saying much because Lost ins ticket Lost what I think happened with Lost is they expect it to only be like a one season thing. And I kept getting renewed. So the writers just kind of kept writing themselves into corners, and they didn't know how to end it by the end. Obviously they didn't because the end was a total cop out. But The Leftovers got put on my radar because I saw one of those clickbait articles about the most evil characters in television history. And one of them was Liv Tyler's character on the leftovers. And I'll say right now, I think maybe I was expecting more but she's not that evil in the leftovers. But it did get me interested in the show enough to watch. There's only three seasons and they're actually pretty short seasons. I think they're like eight to 10 episodes each. So you're not you know, it's not a huge time commit But it's about it's kind of like the the blip in Marvel where like 2% of the population one day just disappears. And it's dealing with the the people who are left and some people lost like one woman in it and lost both of her kids and her husband in the blip while other people didn't lose anyone, but they still have to deal with, you know, the rest of the world, having dealt with and there's one guy, he's a preacher. And when the thing happened, his wife was driving a car and a car that the driver got got blipped away crashed into her. So she ended up in a coma for you know, it's just everybody dealing in different ways. And you'll be interested in Korea, there are two different cults in it. Oh, one of them is a bunch of people who dress in white and smoke all the time they change smoke, and there's some sign that says, you know, we smoke to show our faith. So there's all these people who just start chained smoking. And Dowd is actually kind of the leader of this call and she's more evil than Liv Tyler in this but um, they they basically they're, they're, they want to force people to to remember they are not forced people remember, they want people to get over this blip is what these people are doing. Right. And then there's another coat who follows this. This guy who claims to be able to remove people's pain by hugging them and he actually fathers like a bunch of illegitimate kids. It's it's

Jacob Davidson:

kind of those more than hugging the

James Jay Edwards:

with some of his concubines. Yeah. But he but he people pay him to hug away their pain, so to speak. And the first season takes place in this town in New York. And then the second season they go to this town in Texas that nobody got blipped away or that they call it departures so nobody departed from this town. So everybody thinks they're safe in this town in case this happens again. So it's a big thing that all these people they're camping out outside of this town because they all want to get into this town. And the third season kind of is all over the place. But it's pretty well done. I know that when when we weren't recording off off recording, we were talking with Ian hunt Duffy, last episode about the leftovers. And you know, he was I think his exact words because I've been banging the drum for the leftovers for years, you know, because it is two years ago. Yeah, I just got into it. And it's definitely worth checking out.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, I've always been really excited at the idea of the rapture, you know, Catholic, you know, Doomsday thinking, you know, when all the good people get raptured and go up, what happens to those who are left and you know, that's always fun. And it's kind of like what James Gunn was doing with the Dawn of the Dead remake because his idea was that well the people that would get taken out first and the zombie apocalypse are those helping each other so you're going to be leftover with the worst of the worst and that's kind of like what a rapture is right all the good people could take it out so I like the idea of the rapture is like storytelling but until the leftovers the only one like kind of media we get of that is left be the Left Behind series with Kirk Cameron and then there was

Jacob Davidson:

Nicolas Cage and that other one

Jonathan Correia:

I was about to say that Nick Cage was in the reboot one and now they have fucking Hercules and like another one like those movies are terrible those movies are so bad. So I like the idea of like a non preachy and like you know I do need to get off or get over I should say of my disinterest in Lost because Damon Lindelof has made some really really good his his Watchmen series was so good. So like, guess I should, I should give Leftovers a chance. Maybe that'll be my in between Voyager and Enterprise series.

James Jay Edwards:

The Leftovers The name doesn't do it any favors, because like you said, the Left Behind series does sound like that. But yeah, it's it definitely is better than he will it. It's more satisfying than Lost because it feels like they actually had a three, three season arc planned out, rather than Lost where I think it just got away from them. But one thing that Ian had said to us when we were talking as he said, pay attention to the opening credits in he says Season Two and season three and season three is what I think he meant because every the opening credits sequence is always the same, but they play a different song. And the song has to do with that episode, like one episode, they play over the opening credits, they play the perfect strangers theme song, which believe it or not, actually does have to do with the episode. But the other you know, they play, you know, a different song each time and the end. It'll kind of clue you into what's going to go on that episode. It's really it's really well done.

Jonathan Correia:

What was the vibe of the episode that started with Mambo #5?

Jacob Davidson:

Is that legit?

Jonathan Correia:

I don't know. I haven't seen it

James Jay Edwards:

It is it it is not legit though. He's just that

Jonathan Correia:

would have been great though. Well, I I've been extremely busy these last few weeks I haven't been able to go out and see anything or watch anything at home or anything with my travels and everything but I did accent with HoopTober there's always I always have leftover titles probably because I over stack it. I'd put more than 31 titles so I created a list on letterbox on movies that I said I was going to watch during Hooptober but didn't get to. And one of them was a bonus title from HoopTober called 10 Rillington Place. Have you guys heard of this one?

James Jay Edwards:

I've heard it I haven't watched I have the Twilight Time release of it. Because it was when twilight time was quote shutting down. They had that big sale and that was one things I got but I haven't. It's a serial killer movie, right?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh dude, it is more than that. It is it is incredible. It's it's from 1971 and it was directed by Richard Fletcher who did Conan the Destroyer, Red Sonya. I'm not hyping him up with those titles Amityville 3d, Dr. Doolittle. But he also did the incredible Soylent Green and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Fantastic Voyage, Tora, Tora, Tora, like this guy has like, he is a renaissance man like he's done. He's done like everything. But 10 Rillington Place is incredible. First of all, you have Richard Attenborough, right? Playing a serial killer, like the movie opens up with him murdering a woman. It's fucking intense, in his building, and this is post World War Two England, and John Hurt's character. They're very young John Hurt, moves into the building with his wife, and they have a child like a very young baby. And it just kind of starts off into this like weird manipulation because John hurt's character is very uneducated, they show multiple times that he can't read, but he's trying to work and provide for his family. And at one point, his wife gets pregnant, and she's realistic and is like, we can't afford another baby and all this and so that's when like Richard Attenborough's character, John Christie, you know, being on the bottom floor, his ears kind of perked up. And he's like, you know, I did some medical stuff during the war. And it's just based on

James Jay Edwards:

a real is this is this, like, based on a real case, this sounds super familiar. Like I heard about it on Sword and Scale, or one of my true crime podcasts.

Jonathan Correia:

It's one of those I haven't looked into whether or not it's real, but it is one of those moves, it opens up and says, like, this is based on a true story, and like, a lot of it is based off of like court documents, because it just goes

James Jay Edwards:

It sounds super familiar,

Jonathan Correia:

dude, it's nuts. And like, I'm not spoiling a whole lot going into the fact that like, you know, Richard Attenborough ends up murdering John hurts wife, making it look like kind of a botched abortion, and basically manipulates the shit out of John Hurt into setting him up to look like he was the one that murdered her. And they go through the whole trial where he's sitting there, John Hurt, you know, is character who's, again, not bright. It's in there like no, the truth will prevail, the truth will prevail. And you you see the court happened, and it's just keeps going. And you see him slowly getting more and more destroyed emotionally of just like, oh my god, they're gonna fucking hang me for something I didn't do. And then like him trying to like, rectify it. And then it goes past that for years. It's 10 Rillington place is Honestly, so incredible. It's It's tense. It's dirty. It's monstrous. Like, again, this is Richard Attenborough. I grew up with him as the dinosaur guy, you know, from the Jurassic Park series. This dude like, narrates nature, docs and stuff. And then all this. He played Santa Claus. Come on, on A Miracle on 34th Street. And here he is just playing just the creepiest little bastard. And it's, I can't recommend it enough. I believe it's on Amazon Prime. I think I got it through a fan flicks deal digitally one time and yeah, if anyone wants to sell their Twilight Time copy of it. I'm interested because that was that was some real good shit right there. Highly recommend it. 10 Rellington Place.

Jacob Davidson:

As for me? Well, I've been watching a lot of shot on video stuff. Specifically from the Vinegar Syndrome sublabel Saturns core. Like I saw two pretty out there movies from them. This one called Age of Demons, which I can best describe as if a bunch of punks watching Power Rangers and Kung Fu movies decided to make their own. Because yeah, it's like a. It's like a heavy metal band that bites witches and demons and half a giant robot. And there's another one. That was pretty fun. And, again, pretty out there was called The Zombie Army, which was one of the rare shot on video regional horror movies that was written and directed by a woman named Betty Stapleford. And it's basically kind of a post Gulf War satire where it's like the the Army's reopening a base and they accidentally unleashed a bunch of zombies and the zombies turn the soldiers into zombies. So they send an all women platoon to fight the zombies. And it's all set up like this military base, in effect, Maryland. So yeah, it's this it's always interesting thing to the shot on video stuff, especially the regional stuff, because you know, it's very bare bones like minimal to no budget, but a lot of these filmmakers, particularly from the late 80s for the early to mid 90s had a lot of high concepts and a lot of effort to try to make their weird ass street dreams a reality.

Jonathan Correia:

I always have a bit of a hard time giving shot on video and to a lesser extent regional pictures a chance. I guess I'm a little biased but I always love hearing the stories behind them and how they're made and stuff like do you ever see Knight Chills? Haven't seen that one that d&d? Inspiring?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, I did see that. I did watch that. I got I got that blu ray from Vinegar Syndrome. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

cuz that one that one's really a lot of fun. That one was directed by Katherine Hicks. And when he said female directed regional horror I was like, Oh, dude got to talk about Knight Chills that movies fun where it's like d&d players being stalked by a Knight.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, quick aside. Yeah, just I love the concept for Knight Chills because it's like, kind of a flip on the you know, say satanic d&d plot where it's like one of the players is bullied by the other players and they die in a car accident and their character knight comes to life and starts killing off the other players from the Dungeons Dragons game one by one.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I've never seen so much bullying in a d&d game before that being said when I played d&d, I was the bully in the group so like it I guess that makes sense. perspective wise a

Jacob Davidson:

good thing. Their character didn't come to life and kill you them. Man

Jonathan Correia:

that would have been tragic.

Jacob Davidson:

Who Yeah, no, but yeah, I've really gotten into shot on video and regional horror through sub labels like from Vinegar Syndrome and you know between that and like, America Genre Film Archive, Bleeding Skull, Saturn's Core, Yeah, I always I usually blind by just because I like being surprised and a lot of these titles are just so out there you never know what you're gonna get.

Jonathan Correia:

It really is kind of like the mentality of just like, well we don't have much of a budget and stuff so let's go for the most batshit thing we can possibly put on video as our selling point. And we don't have money go for shock.

Jacob Davidson:

And it's also funny because I feel like a lot of these titles also are kind of vehicles for bands that either were the filmmakers or were tied to the filmmakers because like in Age of Demons there's heavy metal band who also helped make the movie and with Zombie Army there is a music from a band that was involved in the making the movie so like a lot of these I feel like we're a lot of times vehicles to try and sell sell a band or their music.

Jonathan Correia:

Understandable can we'll never forget what I always forget what the name of it was, but there was like, I don't it was a rap label doing a parody of The Blair Witch Project. And it was just different rap artists talking about this like curse of this like Blair Witch type figure.

Jacob Davidson:

idea never wasn't meant the Bare Wench Project. Yeah, it

Jonathan Correia:

was like that and like Eminem pops up and it for like two seconds to talk about about it. And they like never do anything. It's just literally just them talking about this like finger and stuff. And it was just so bad but so entertaining. Yeah. Long, long live regional, uplifting, independent artists.

Jacob Davidson:

Exactly.

James Jay Edwards:

Another thing that I watched it's kind of timely with what's been going on first with Bat Girl and then now with Coyote Vs. Acme. But I saw Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman's The Fantastic Four have either you guys seen this,

Jacob Davidson:

but yeah, actually a friend of mine worked on that. Oh, nice. Olmec it

James Jay Edwards:

is. It basically is the original tax shelter movie. That I think that in order to keep the rights for the Fantastic Four they had to have a movie in production not released in production. So it's legendary Roger Corman and it has since been leaked, you can get bootlegs of it. And it's not a good movie, but it's a Roger Corman movie.

Jonathan Correia:

I will fight you on that. I love that the original Fantastic Four movie,

James Jay Edwards:

a lot of Roger Corman stuff was, it's a Roger Corman Fantastic Four movie is what it is. And what sucks about it is when they're interviewing all the people who put their heart and soul in this way, they really did work on it, no one knew that it was just a tax sheltered review, it wasn't going to be released. So these people, you know, poured into it, you know, and they promoted it, and it just never came out. Even Stan Lee at one point where he, um, he was, I might have been at Comic Con, he was talking about it, you know, and he basically disowned it before it came out. You know, it's kind of sad that it's one thing if you got to put something into production to keep the rights, but it's another to just basically fool people into bleeding over this production when you know that it's just gonna sit in a vault. Well,

Jonathan Correia:

this the silliest thing about that case is, and I, this has to be known. The reason why the 90s Fantastic Four movie was made is because something had to be in production in order to keep the rights. That's the story for every Fantastic Four movie that has been made. And that's why they're always so rushed. The difference is, is that it just needs to be in production, they could have stayed in pre production for decades and not shot a single frame and would have been fine. So the fact that they went ahead and just made it, that documentary is brilliant. And if you can find the filmmaker online, you can buy a Blu Ray copy from him directly. And he does have a nice quality version of the film as well. That will include as like a bonus disc. So it's well worth seeking out. But yeah, they even interview Lloyd Kaufman of Troma about because he was approached to do it too. And he was of the mindset of that's not cool. Making a movie not releasing it. I'm not going to make something that's not going to be released. Whereas Corman was like, you know, money. Why not? Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, I won't see it soured me on Roger Corman, but I kind of took him down a peg or two in my mind, because I've always thought that he was like a for that people kind of a filmmaker. And this kind of bummed me out on him. The fact that he was in on he was on the studio side rather than his people side. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

but I genuinely think that movie was pretty, it was a lot of fun. And I do think it is the best film version of Ben Grimm that we have and The Thing like they really nailed his tragic story and the costume wasn't bad for what it was like.

James Jay Edwards:

It was kind of RAD. The costume because it to make his facial features so they had like animatronics. I mean, the costume is pretty good. I can't believe they put so much effort into something that they knew was not going to see the light of day.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, a lot of Korean

Jacob Davidson:

did although Yeah, it is funny to have that then they integrated that plotline into Arrested Development. Remember, David, David Cross his character Tobias hooks up with not the real one, but like an actress who played Sue Storm in that version of the Roger Corman Fantastic Four movie. And in this alternate universe, also the Fantastic Four movie came out and was on Mystery Science Theater 3000.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, it was played by Who's Who's that comedian?

Jacob Davidson:

Was it? Maria Bamford?

Jonathan Correia:

Yes. Maria Bamford. Edie. She was fantastic because she's going through like all these type of addictions, and David Tobias just thinking, Oh, this is part of your acting process. Gotcha. Okay, so yeah, we're living on the street or something now. It just kept going. Yeah, that was one of the few highlights of season 4.

Jacob Davidson:

because he also meets her at what he thinks is a method one clinic or T or acting course but it's actually a methadone clinic.

Jonathan Correia:

Season Four was pretty solid of Arrested Development, especially once they like re edited it into the format of like previous seasons. It had some really gold moments of Maria Bradford as the actress who played Sue Storm in the 90s Fantastic Four was a great plot Plus, they also had the amazing joke. Cinco de quatro, I still my favorite. So yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

that was going um, let's see also on my end, we had a screening at The Aero recently for the original 1966 Sergio Corbucci's Django with None other than Franco Nero in person.

Jonathan Correia:

So jealous.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, it was an amazing show. And Jay Yeah, Django isn't really outright horror, but I feel like Corbucci had a lot of horror influences because like it's just very haunting with how, you know, a lot of times he's walking alone in like the Badlands and just graveyards everywhere.

Jonathan Correia:

And he's dragging a coffin behind him. Most of them regularly coffin behind him, which that is just an eerie image. Like, I mean, talk about I know, I talked about Roadhouse a lot with like, greatest intimidation lines and whatever, but you're not gonna fuck with a dude who's walking across a desert dragging a coffin behind him, because

Jacob Davidson:

And the people who do he kills!

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, you're gonna be like, Wait, is that for me? Or is there someone else already in there? Turns out it's a giant ass gun, which

Jacob Davidson:

is even a chain gun. Yeah, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

So like, yeah. gencos dope. Yeah. And

Jacob Davidson:

it was very interesting to hear Franco Nero talk about the movie and about working with Corbucci. Specifically on the tenets that well, Django is a very left leaning film and kind of matching Corbucci's politics, you know, he fights the Ku Klux Klan, or like a standard for the Ku Klux Klan, like former Confederates. And he was talking about how like Sergio Leone would visit the set, and how Lucho Fulci or like he would he met Fulci, and oh, man, he had a lot of stories about Fulci, just in that Fulci which is bullshit all the time. Like, he'd meet up with frequently and it says, like, oh, sorry, Franco, I was just having lunch with John F. Kennedy Jr. or with JFK,

Jonathan Correia:

wanted to be a fly on that, on that wall of that set in see all these legendary people coming by just to visit.

Jacob Davidson:

But ya know, I mean, it would, it sounds like it was a hell of an experience, and even talked about working on Django Unchained and just kind of the process that led to that, because like, for a long time, he thought, Tarantino wasn't going to include him. And he even tried pitching Tarantino and idea that his Jenko would be Jamie Foxx is Django is real father. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, it's not not disproven in the movie, you know. I'm just still waiting for Django Strikes Again to get a proper like, home video release, because as far as I know, it's only been released on VHS, and it's the only official sequel to Django. Like, Django movies are its own sub genre of movies. Using that title, including two that involve Tarantino between Sukiyaki Western Django and Django Unchained. But yeah, my VHS of Django Strikes Again is kept in pristine condition.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And also, interestingly enough on the Arrow blu ray, there's, it came with the bonus movie Texas, Aidios, which was also kind of considered a pseudo Django sequel, pretty much just because it had Franco Nero in a similar role. So yeah, just Yeah, Italian movie franchise and get weird like that. But that theme song. Oh, yeah, as banger, absolute banger.

James Jay Edwards:

Let's move on to our topic, which is award season. And you've seen all the Critics Awards and the globes and this, this Critics Choice and the Oscars are coming up. And as an aside here, I don't know if we have any Oscar voters here, but please, please, if you're an Oscar voter, watch Robot Dreams. Because it's the best animated movie of the year. I know that people are gonna fight me on that for The Boy and

the Heron and Spider-Man:

Across the universe, Across the Spider-Verse But Robot Dreams show

Jonathan Correia:

Actually, you if you're a voter watch all the fucking movies that are nominated

James Jay Edwards:

right well, we'll get into that with the real topic but um, the only real exciting thing about the Oscars this year for horror is now we have Academy Award nominee Godzilla Minus One

Jonathan Correia:

and Poor Things.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, yeah. Poor Things. Yep. Yeah, Poor Thing's actually got its its share as well. Yeah. But um, we're not gonna talk about the Oscars, but watch Robot Dreams. We were going to talk about the Razzies, which I don't think any of us are really a big fan of that. And what I was saying we you know, watch all the movies. In researching for this episode. I realize that Razzie voters it's not a requirement for them to watch every nominee. Anyway, the Razzies if you're not familiar with them, which you probably are but if you're not, they are kind of a worst of which I've made my feelings on worst of lists known as well. It's It's just I just don't have time for it. But anyway, the Razzies they do worse picture worst director worst that you know the end. It started in 1980 and let me we were laughing about the Worst Picture nominees for 1980 Let's look at them. You

Jonathan Correia:

might have been laughing I wasn't laughing I got fired the fuck up laughing

James Jay Edwards:

meaning how ridiculous it is but okay, the winner was Can't Stop the Music. Can't Stop the music. I can see that that is, if you're not familiar with Can't Stop the Music. It's basically what Spice World was. But for The Village People I

Jonathan Correia:

was about to say that's the Village People movie, right? Yeah, yeah. And it's Yeah, but the other

James Jay Edwards:

nominees Cruising. Wow. The formula Friday the 13th. What? The Jazz Singer

Jonathan Correia:

directed by Richard Fletcher, who did 10 Rillington Place

James Jay Edwards:

The The Jazz Singer?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, he did. He did the 80s Jazz Singer,

James Jay Edwards:

The Nude Bomb. Raise the Titanic. Saturn 3. Really? Was Saturn 3 thought of as bad when it came out? I don't know. Yeah, it was fun, Windows and Xanadu. Okay. Some of these I can see the Friday the 13th and Cruising. Also

Jacob Davidson:

a part of inspiration for talking about the Razzies now is because the Criterion is kind of taking the Razzies back in that they added an entire section to the Criterion Channel. And the Razzies goes to where they've added several Razzies nominated and award winning movies to the channel so that people can watch them and potentially reevaluate them. Some of them are not bad. Yeah, another guy Cruising, The Blair Witch Project, Showgirls, Heaven's Gate, and, and stuff like Freddy Got Fingered, The Wicker Man remake, and Gili.

James Jay Edwards:

looking at some of these other like not only nominees winners 1981 Mommy Dearest won. Is Mommy Dearest considered a bad movie? I think it's pretty good. It

Jacob Davidson:

did pretty well from what I understand the one

James Jay Edwards:

that that I really don't get 1985 Rambo First Blood Part Two, one the Razzie for worse picture is Rambo considered bad Rambo is a good movie.

Jonathan Correia:

And that's and that's the thing too, is that like, you gotta remember with with this show, people who the voters are not required to watch any of these movies. And so a lot of this is just reactionary to its it's like the earliest form of internet trolling before the internet.

James Jay Edwards:

I was gonna say now I think nowadays, I think people pile on to what is considered bad or what's considered a joke on the internet, but back in 1980, I guess. I know that Siskel and Ebert totally panned Friday the 13th they hated it. So it might be the end Cruising I guess they could have been going on the subject matter.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, and I definitely will get into that in a little bit. Yeah, I

James Jay Edwards:

just don't get Howard the Duck won worst picture in 86 with under the cherry moon. Yeah. Under the Yeah, it was it was a split. Yeah, it tied some of these like Showgirls won which Showgirls is only been seen as a good movie in retrospect, once people started understanding Paul Verhoeven's, career and how everything he does is kind of a parody. And interestingly enough, Paul Verhoeven for Showgirls was the first winner to show up in person to collect his Razzie, because

Jonathan Correia:

of course, he would, of course, that's, that's a total Paul Verhoeven move. And the thing about Showgirls is it's not a badly made movie. This it's it's purely the script, honestly, like in rewatching, Vinegar Syndromes gorgeous 4K. The visuals that the dancing that like Verhoeven went all out on like, making like a classic Hollywood, like musical number movie that just happens to feature a lot of sex. And it really is, like a gorgeous looking film. But yes, the script it's a little rough to put nicely. But yeah, dude, it's, it's again, a lot of this is reactionary to like, just reading headlines because no one's required to watch any of this. And there are times where it does seem a bit skewed into some isms. I mean, Cruising being nominated, Cruising is a fantastic film. And as Jay said earlier, why why would it end up on this list other than perhaps its subject matter, you know, of, of exploring, you know, leather bars and stuff. Tyler Perry's films get nominated all the time. Oftentimes, it does seem to dogpile on women often as well as as well as minorities and so there's times where it's just like, like, I wish there was more effort it feels lazy. A lot of the times these nominations and stuff like it's it's too much of an obvious choice or too lazy of a choice. And it's like, what are you what are your goals here? Your goal is just to be an asshole. Because if if so cool just be an asshole. But is your goal to actually like call out the industry for some of this stuff because there are times when they do call out stuff that needs to be called out like they do special categories. Right? Like, like they'll do stuff like worst excuse for family entertainment, you know, which is, you know, stuff that needs to be called out of just like Dude, you're not putting actual effort into something that families would watch in

James Jay Edwards:

2010 they did worst eye gouging misuse of 3d. And anyone who remembers the 3d trend of 2010 That's a category that was needed. absolutely needed.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, charge an extra 10 bucks to just get your eyes assaulted by post 3d That's just yeah, have hasn't really done sometimes

James Jay Edwards:

it's it's kind of like poking fun at the movie like there was a special category and 97 Worst reckless disregard for human life and public property. Con Air won it but the other nominees are the Lost World Jurassic Park, turbulence volcano and Batman and Robin. It's like all of those movies. It's reckless disregard for property. And I love the Con Air won because okay, they landed a plane on the Las Vegas strip

Jonathan Correia:

of massive plane. Yeah. Fucking love Con Air.

James Jay Edwards:

I love Con Air. I don't know why Nicholas Cage could have retired after 97 and the double shot of Con Air and Face/Off, and his legacy in cinematic history would have been cemented.

Jonathan Correia:

But thank God he did x and we wouldn't know because we've

James Jay Edwards:

gotten some good stuff since.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. But my question to you guys is, if this was better organized, it had more of like a, like a goal of like actually critiquing, being a crit chance to critique and not just like troll or come off lazy. Do you guys think that there that this is a valid thing, because I know we often talk about how worst of lists, lists are tacky and lame. And just like shitty, but like, we all know that making a film. It takes multiple miracles. It's not just one miracle, and it takes hundreds and there's so many hours of blood, sweat and tears put into the making of even the worst films ever. So is there a place for something like this? Or is this just punching down? Well,

Jacob Davidson:

it is interesting, because I do feel like the Razzies in some ways, were ahead of their time, and that they kind of exemplify what we see a lot in social media and the internet in terms of accentuating the negative and commentary and reviews. But as you also pointed out, it does sometimes do a good job at poking fun at trends, especially on the more corporate or studio side of things and just kind of a yeah, just stuff that may be considered an annoyance to audiences. But also on the other hand, it does kind of punch down sometimes, like they only just recently removed child actors from their worst actors category. So there is some mean spirited ness to it. So I don't know. I mean, like I think maybe would have to be restructured or they'd have to kind of reinterpret how they do the Razzies but you know, that maybe, maybe there is something to it.

James Jay Edwards:

I you know, I don't really I kind of think that it's definitely punching down as I think worst of lists are and the thing is, and I guess the same can be said about the best of lists or awards. Film is such as subjective and, you know, opinions like looking at I think I was looking at the the year that Cats was released at one the Razzie for worse film, cats is awesome. I've told you guys that. But a lot of people disagree with me on that.

Jonathan Correia:

Agree to disagree.

James Jay Edwards:

It's it is not only film criticism, I'll just say film opinions is so subjective that you know, if you say these are the worst movies, either I, I do like the special categories, and that's where I think that the Razzie should concentrate because they do. You know, now one that is kind of funny, and unless you realize why it went on, they had worst Bruce Willis performance in 2021 movie, Bruce Willis made like eight movies in 2021. Now, back when he was doing this, no one realized that he knew his diagnosis and he was banking money for when he couldn't work anymore. So in retrospect, it's a little sad and the Razzies To their credit, I think that they do You go back in retrospect like they rescinded Shelly Duvall's nomination for The Shining decades after because they realized that that performance was a product of Stanley Kubrick's abuse. And honestly, I think, Stan, I think that Shelley Duvalls performance in The Shining is really good. If you know the character, you know, she's supposed to be kind of skittish, and you know, and nervous like that. So, anyway, at first glance, the worst Bruce Willis performance looks like it's kind of just poking fun at his body of work that year. But when you realize why he did so many movies, it's a little sad. But as far as as far as just going Worst Actor, worst actors worst director, that I don't think is as necessary as that they're not calling out the industry so much as they are just, they're just emphasizing their own opinions on what is bad. It's a worst of list base, which I don't really like worst of list and because like you said, Any movie that gets made should be celebrated, I think. And I'm a pretty soft critic, I can generally find something about any movie that I like, which except mme web which Madam Web I can guarantee will be a Razzie nominee next year.

Jonathan Correia:

One of the things that I do respect about them is they do tend to keep the nominees being these more big budget studio films. They don't go after indies too often.

James Jay Edwards:

Except the Blair Witch Project.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, they nobody she's Yeah, no, yeah, if we want to bring it back to horror the fact that both Blair Witch is were nominated. And were nominated pretty across the board because I do recall like the first one they gave the lead actress worse actress to Yeah. Which is Yeah, it's so there. Again, there's some aspects where I'm like, Yes, call out the industry for you know, stuff like it 9096 worst movie, worst written movie Grossing over 100 million, you know, which

James Jay Edwards:

like, that's kind of a rad catergory.

Jonathan Correia:

It is. But then you look at the but then you look at the nominees and it's Twister. It's Hunchback of Notre Dame its Independence Day. Its Mission Impossible. Yeah, Time to Kill. Those are all great movies. Like it's just like, wait, what isn't? That's where like, that disconnect kind of is. It's like, is this actually like, and where is that like, criteria for any of these things? I mean, I kind of understand with like, Oscars and stuff that there might be a bit of a criteria but is there even there because like we said, like Razzies, they're not required to watch the movies. Oscars they are, but they don't enforce it. You know? Yeah. Here's

James Jay Edwards:

a great special category 1998 worst movie trends of the year, and the winner was 58 year old leading men wooing 28 year old leading ladies. But here, the other nominees were trailers to give away the film's entire plot, longer movies, shorter plots, THX deafening audio, mega zillion dollar cross promotional overkill, Armageddon, Godzilla, et cetera.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, but I gotta say, the promotional overkill of Godzilla 98 is fucking dope as someone who owns quite a few.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, that's why it didn't win. 58 year old leading men wooing 28 year old leading ladies was the winner. But longer movies, shorter plots. Oh, I'm still on that plane. Come on. Let's get rid of that. I hate that. I was hoping Gravity a few years ago would bring back the 90 Minute Oscar winner. I mean, like I said, Killers of the Flower Moon I love the first two and a half hours. The last hour drag was a long one. I

Jonathan Correia:

just want to know, because because they also have other awards, like the Razzie Redeemer award of people who have made really good comebacks, which was awarded to like Ben Affleck, Sylvester Stallone, Melissa McCarthy, Eddie Murphy, and so on. And I think that's cool. Recognizing like, okay, so you made a few stinkers, but you came back awesome, but I just want to know, because they have worse career achievement. And they gave one to Linda Blair in 83, like Linda Blair do up to 83 that earned her that you know, exorcise

James Jay Edwards:

sequels and movies like Grotesque, you know, like, she was stuck in horror movies, Hell Night night around them. She was no budget horror movies, which, you know, she was considered a scream queen back then.

Jonathan Correia:

But when did Savage Streets come out? Because that should not be used against her because that was 84. So she didn't get a redeemer award for doing Savage Streets after she showed up have although

Jacob Davidson:

I also like when, like an actor or filmmaker kind of takes back the Razzie. Like, like you were saying with Paul Verhoeven, you know, accent Being the first director to accept his. And also one of my favorite stories around the Razzies was how, Halle Berry, one Worst Actress for Catwoman. And so she showed up to collect the Razzie while holding our Oscar.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. The Oscar was it Monsters Ball that she won? I think it was, I think it was. Yeah. Yeah. And she showed up with her Oscar to the client that see, that's leaning into it. Those are people who are kind of not really into the joke, because I don't really think it's a joke. But those are people were having fun with it. And that's, I think, the spirit that it was originally back in 1980. When it was originally when it was originally conceived. I think it was more of like a you know, just like a joke. Let's have fun with this. And I think it got out of hand to where nowadays. It's just really mean spirited, you know, to the point where they nominate little kids who, you know, little kids not going to take it as an honor like like Halle Berry. You know, a little kid's not going to take it or like Paul Verhoeven. They're not going to take it in stride and think, oh, yeah, you know, let's let's lean into this, they're going to be hurt. Well, remember,

Jonathan Correia:

they had been nominating kids for decades, because Macaulay Culkin was nominated for like, three of his movies that came out in 95. You know, so there was definitely like, a lot of that going on. And there are little moments. I know, my girl Sandy Bullock showed up. For what about Steve? And it was because the Razzies is, is done the night before the Oscars, so she won a Razzie for worse Actress of the Year and then the next day won for Best Actress for the blind side. But she showed up to Razzies with DVD copies of All About Steve started handing them out to everybody. So like, I like, you know, stuff like that where people are taking it back. But I mean, it's it's just again, where's the disconnect? I mean, listen I'm a I'm a huge Neil Diamond fan and The Jazz Singer. I understand it has its problems and, and all that stuff. But like that soundtrack is dope, but it's so weird that like Neil Diamond to be for Neil Diamond to be nominated for a Golden Globe for best performance, but then also won for Worst Actor for the same exact performance. You know, it's again, where is the the connection? You know what I mean? Could it

James Jay Edwards:

be that the Razzies saw it as problematic, and it's a day and the globes didn't

Jonathan Correia:

No, they weren't thinking of that scene, which is just, again, you're remaking The Jazz Singer in the 80s. And you're like, Man, I know. The original film was all about blackface, we have to have a scene where we put Neil Diamond in blackface, right?

James Jay Edwards:

No, no, no, but it is

Jonathan Correia:

why. But I will say this, because of that scene, Ernie Hudson had one of his first speaking roles. So I mean, that doesn't redeem it. But it's still really funny that Ernie Hudson is the heckler that calls out Neil Diamond for being in blackface in the movie. I always like pointing that out for you. So yeah. Oh, God. I wanted to ask him that question so many times when working with him, but I was like, no, no, no, let's keep it perfessional. But

James Jay Edwards:

from what you said, it sounds like he's a pretty cool guy. So he probably would have given you a straight answer.

Jonathan Correia:

I know. But it's not always the best look to talk to people about their careers when you're at work. Someday, though, we'll be buds and I'll I'll ask Ernie Hudson, all the questions about Penitentiary 2 and The Jazz Singer that my heart desires

James Jay Edwards:

was sitting in a hot tub with a beer with him.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh man, one can dream right one can dream and

Jacob Davidson:

dream. But at the end of the day

Jonathan Correia:

razzberry the Razzies are punching down. And we're not fans of that. We're not fans of worst of lists. But I do think that there is especially in this age where of moviemaking, where the mid budget film is almost non existent. And everything is either tentpole or made for next to nothing. I do think that there should be more calling out of the industry. And I just don't know if this type of format is the way to go about it. I think what we saw with Madame Webb and Dakota Johnson, and just using that platform to call it out is pretty brilliant. And I applaud her for it. But yeah, I just, it's 2024 Do we really need to be making worst of lists?

James Jay Edwards:

I haven't made them I it because also some of my colleagues in the film critic society who one of whom is a Razzie voter, by the way, but um, some of them on their worst of lists. I was seeing movies that are on my best Beau is Afraid, made a couple of their worst of lists and, and it was on my best of lists, so it's all subjective. Let's take a look at the 2023 Worst Picture nominees and see how many of them we actually liked. First, The Exorcist: Believer, like the first half,kind of fell apart. You

Jacob Davidson:

I never got around to that one.

James Jay Edwards:

Expendables 4 I didn't see so I don't know.

Meg 2:

The Trench.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

we all love Meg 2

Jacob Davidson:

ya know I had a great time with that one

James Jay Edwards:

Shazam! Fury the Gods, for a shazam movie it is what it is it did have you know unicorns and you know Minotaurs and stuff it was cool Winnie the Pooh Blood and Honey for what it was a Winnie the Pooh slasher I thought it was okay but anyway

Jonathan Correia:

but look but continue but like look over this list I mean it's it's all kind of lazy isn't it? I mean like I can understand some of these getting called out you know but like it just first of all I don't know what this what the Razzies have against Stallone and and pretty much everything he does but like it's pretty I know he got a redeemer award but it seems like if you look through the history of it, I mean, that year that Rambo two was nominated, so it was Rocky IV which I again will fight anyone in the back parking lot over Rocky IV. But like even just looking over, you know, all this stuff like Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny is nominated for worse remake rip off a sequel, you know, and it's like that it was it? It was a Indiana Jones movie. That's what it was anyone who critiques it for being too like, oh, there's time travel. Oh, there's things it's like, Bro there was Do you not remember the ghosts spirits and Raiders of the Lost Ark? Like yeah, face melting. There was always that weird shit in there. But yeah, it's just it just feels lazy. I mean, look at the Worst Screen combo they they just said any two people in Expendable 4, you know? Expend four bowls, or any two money grubbing investors who donated two $400 million 400 million for remake rights to The Exorcist, Exorcist: Believer

James Jay Edwards:

Well it's kind of funny though.

Jonathan Correia:

Again it's you know broken clocks are right twice a day so like

James Jay Edwards:

any two money grubbing investors who donated to the exorcist that's good that's good times but yeah it worst remake, rip off or sequel is another is another one of those categories I think might be justified because I don't think Indiana Jones belongs on it. But I understand the spirit of the award is you know, do something original Hollywood so

Jonathan Correia:

but also, why is Salma Hayek nominated for Magic Mike's Last Dance because like she was definitely not the worst part of that movie. By a long shot.

James Jay Edwards:

They're just trying to find ways to nominate Magic Mike's Last Dance, which

Jonathan Correia:

there is very valid critiques. For that trust as the resident Magic Mike fan of the of the group. That movie peaked with that first dance between Salma Hayek and Channing Tatum and it just could not recover from how fucking hot that dance was. He couldn't you cut it. It was too it was too much sexiness.

James Jay Edwards:

All right, well, let's wrap this one up. So, in conclusion, Razzies, kind of punching down. What do you guys think of the Razzies? Are they necessary? Or are they just mean spirited? I'm kind of on the fence with that, because I think parts of them are not necessarily necessary, but they do call out Hollywood in some places. But mostly, I think they are just mean spirited. And

Jacob Davidson:

either way, I'll be watching the Razzie movies on the Criterion Channel. Yeah, yeah, Freddy Got Fingered as a criterion movie.

Jonathan Correia:

I was about to say that like, I do love this kind of taking back that the Criterion Channel is to and especially when it comes to Freddy Got Fingered, Because I do have a gray market blu ray of Freddy Got Fingered, and the artwork is made to look like a Criterion Collection.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you seen someone made a Criterion Cover for the fake movie inside of Boogie Nights angels live in my town.

Jonathan Correia:

That's it.

Jacob Davidson:

I really do love the kind of cottage industry of fake criterion covers, because like I've seen I've also seen one for a Walk Hard the Dewey Cox Story and just a lot just any movie can be improved by giving it a criterion style

Jonathan Correia:

cover. Which I gotta say I just finally convinced someone to rewatch Popstar with me because I've been wanting to watch pop star again. Yeah, Tim Meadows is the goat of music parody actors, and I feel like there needs to be he needs to be included in more projects like I need more Tim Meadows in my life because his performance in Walk Hard and Popstar are just top tier.

James Jay Edwards:

Cool. Well let's let's get out here. Oh and watch Robot Dreams. Trust me. You won't regret it and love Let us know what you think of the Razzies. And if you agree with us, or if maybe you love them, maybe you think they're hilarious, but I don't know. Our music is by Restless Spirits. So go give them a listen. And our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go give him a like, you can find us on any of the socials under@EyeOnHorror or ihorror.com, which is the website that we all call home yet go to iHorror. And speaking of awards, vote on the iHorror Awards. They're all up there, which

Jonathan Correia:

is awesome because they are highlighting horror short films, which is always great to uplift, you know, independent filmmakers. So watch all the films that are nominated for iHorror awards, especially the short films and let's you know, get get these new voices out there.

James Jay Edwards:

Speaking of short films, just real quick, since we're signing off, have you guys watched Gridlock? Ian hunts, the short that he talked about last week. Oh, it's really good. It's I tracked it's about 20 minutes. It's on YouTube. It's good. Check it out.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, check. Check it out. Gridlock. gridlock. Definitely. Yep.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. And we will see you guys in a couple of weeks. Yeah, I'm giving you guys homework. Watch Gridlock on YouTube. We'll see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison.

Jonathan Correia:

And I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Jay Binges The Leftovers Like A Madman
Correia Review 10 Rillington Place (On Tubi and Home Video)
Jacob's Recent Shot On Video Recommendations
Jay Reviews Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman's The Fantastic Four (On VOD and Home Video)
Jacob Attends a Screening of Django W/Special Guest Franco Nero!
Punching Down At the Razzies
Outros
Restless Spirit Goes Hard ASF