Eye On Horror

Revisiting 1BR with Naomi Grossman and Alok Mishra

January 02, 2023 iHorror Season 5 Episode 21
Revisiting 1BR with Naomi Grossman and Alok Mishra
Eye On Horror
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Eye On Horror
Revisiting 1BR with Naomi Grossman and Alok Mishra
Jan 02, 2023 Season 5 Episode 21
iHorror

Welcome to the season finale of Eye On Horror! This week, the boys discuss the Adult Swim Yule Log, Christmas action movies, current awards screeners, and some recent horror video games. We are then joined by actress Naomi Grossman and producer Alok Mishra to talk about their film 1BR! We chat about the making of this 2020 horror movie, the effect of the pandemic on its success, and what we should expect for the 1BR franchise (is a sequel in the works??). Listen in for all the details!

Vamos Argentina!


https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Welcome to the season finale of Eye On Horror! This week, the boys discuss the Adult Swim Yule Log, Christmas action movies, current awards screeners, and some recent horror video games. We are then joined by actress Naomi Grossman and producer Alok Mishra to talk about their film 1BR! We chat about the making of this 2020 horror movie, the effect of the pandemic on its success, and what we should expect for the 1BR franchise (is a sequel in the works??). Listen in for all the details!

Vamos Argentina!


https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is Episode 99, otherwise known as season five, Episode 21. Otherwise known as Season Five season finale. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host, Jacob Davison, how you doing? Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Doing good back in LA. After, you know visiting folks in Connecticut, and getting ready for the first night of Hanukkah tonight.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, nice. You brought the cold weather with you because it is cold out here. I mean, and I know when it dips into the 40s as Californians cry but yeah, Burr. Also with us, as always is your other other hosts Jon Correia. How you doing Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I'm nice and toasty. I got a new poncho.

James Jay Edwards:

A new one? You have two now?

Jonathan Correia:

I now have two I have an indoor poncho and an outdoor poncho. This is my this is gonna be my outdoor poncho. I'm breaking it in. It's a little stiff. But yeah, this is what I'm gonna be wearing at testing events from here out.

Jacob Davidson:

No such thing as too many ponchos.

Jonathan Correia:

Listen, it is, to quote the Mighty Boosh it is impossible to be unhappy in a poncho.

James Jay Edwards:

So yeah, cool. What are you guys been doing? One thing I want to talk about here? Because it's all over the internet. Let's start off with the Adult Swim Yule Log.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

You've seen it, Jacob.

Jacob Davidson:

I've seen it. I've seen it. All right.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

No. How do you watch it? Do you do you need the Adult Swim app?

Jacob Davidson:

It's on HBO Max.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's on HBO Max and I heard it's also on I guess they aired it at like 2:30 in the YouTube. But I can't confirm that because I watched an HBO morning on Cartoon Network. And at first the first like maybe Max.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, same here. three minutes is one of those you logs. There's like music and it shows a fire. And you and I can see you going okay, this is dumb. I'm turning it off. Don't turn it off. Yeah, it it becomes I mean, I don't want to give too much of it away. Although you can't really give anything away because there's a little everything in it. It's like it's a kitchen sink. But there's a horror movie in this you log thing. Yep. And it's it's it's nuts. It's so crazy. And to add some detail this Yule Log special was written and directed by Casper Kelly. The guy that gave us the unforgettable Too Many Cooks.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. And also that what is it? Pictures of a bear? What What's the full name?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, like Unedited Footage of a Bear.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, yeah. So you kind of know what you're getting in with that because that guy that guy's crazy himself. And

Jacob Davidson:

he also was the guy who did the Cheddar Goblin commercial lest we forget.

Jonathan Correia:

That's right. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

So he's a hero of yours then right?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes, he is.

Jonathan Correia:

Always comes back to Mandy here.

Jacob Davidson:

Yep. Mandy's eternal just like Cheddar Goblin.

Jonathan Correia:

I love Yule Logs, one of my favorite if I'm, if I stay in LA I always go to the Drawing Room which is a bar my buddy works at that opens at 6am. So I always go there on Christmas morning and we watch the KTVLA yule log which is great because it's literally just them filming someone stoking the fire it's terrible. It's great. I love it.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you seen the yule log that is Darth Vader's head from basically from Return of the Jedi when but it's just however many hours of Vader's head burning

Jonathan Correia:

just on a loop.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. The other big thing that came out this week is and not super horror, but still a spectacle.

Avatar:

The Way of the Water

Jacob Davidson:

aka Avatar Two!

James Jay Edwards:

Avatar Two yes which the long awaited avatar two, what 13 years late

Jacob Davidson:

13 years!

James Jay Edwards:

you have you guys seen this

Jacob Davidson:

yet? I did. I saw an IMAX 3d Just yesterday.

James Jay Edwards:

That's the only way to see it. I mean it avatar it's an avatar movie. It's what you expect. It's James Cameron showing off his you know, multi million dollar budget. And the only way to watch James Cameron

Jonathan Correia:

that is an understatement, multi million dollar budget

James Jay Edwards:

100 million multi 100 million.

Jonathan Correia:

Doesn't it have to make over a billion dollars just to like, break even.

James Jay Edwards:

It wouldn't surprise me

Jacob Davidson:

something like that.

James Jay Edwards:

It's but it's a visual feast. And the only way to watch James Cameron show off his budget is on an IMAX screen in 3d with super Dolby. I mean, it's just, you know, I mean, I'm as theater phobic as the next person in this pandemic time, but you definitely need to see Avatar. I mean, it should go without saying that an avatar movie should be seen on the biggest screen possible, but man, it's an impressive feat of filmmaking.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm excited about the tech and the the pool have, you know technology and where filmmaking can go? I just I have issues with the white savior storyline and just white creators just making films that are indigenous stories and based on it, it's similar reservations I have to Dune and others, you know, but I'm sorry, I'm that Spoilsport. Where I think

Jacob Davidson:

no, no, no, that's a valid criticism.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, it is. And I mean, it's, it's not I wouldn't really call it white savior, because the white guys are the bad guys. Mostly, especially in this one because, you know, spoiler alert for a movie that's 13 years old, the, quote, white savior last time he assimilated into his avatar. So he is one of the Navi now, you know, and they kind of show that he's kind of outcast, because him and his kids all have four fingers when regular NaVi have three. So, you know, he's kind of they're kind of treated differently. So I don't know if I would consider this one as white savior as the first the first one. You were saying that you were saying the northmen was Lion King. The first ones Pocahontas.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, it's Pocahontas. It's legitimately Fern Gully

Jacob Davidson:

Dances with Wolves.

Jonathan Correia:

It's like Dances with Wolves. Last Samurai like it's it's the white savior trope to a tee but it's it's FernGully as fuck, but I mean, it's or district nine. I mean, like it's yeah, it's such a widespread trope and yeah, but

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, but I will say I did really like the creature effects like, it's not yet it doesn't exist. It's not exactly horror. But there is a scene that kind of skirts horror where like, there's a killer whale crab shark thing that tries to eat one of the characters and it's pretty thrilling, very Jaws like and also I really want avatar to to succeed because if avatar two does well, then it looks like there's a pretty good chance that there will be an Alita sequel. And Damnit, I want that.

Jonathan Correia:

Didn't him and Rodriguez take a blood oath.

Jacob Davidson:

They took a blood oath. They say that they will make that sequel over a blood oath. And I'm holding them to it.

Jonathan Correia:

That's a bit much guys.

Jacob Davidson:

Tomato tomahto either way, I want it.

Jonathan Correia:

i Hey, listen. I'm always down for blood oaths. Yes, always. But that's just still seems a bit much but who am I to judge?

Jacob Davidson:

Look, it's James Cameron. He does what he does.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, he if James Cameron wants to make an Alita sequel, it doesn't matter how avatar two does. It'll get made true. What else you guys been seeing? No, not no.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, well cinematic void with the American Oh, man. It's it's great. Basically, Elliott Cinemateque been doing a very fun untraditional Christmas action movie series recently. So I got I've seen a couple of Gould plays a teller working at a bank on Christmas Eve. And he them. Like they started off with one of my personal favorite Canadian tax shelter movies. The Silent Partner with Elliott Gould, Christopher Plummer and a very young John Candy. Have you guys seen it? sees that Christopher Plummer, who's dressed as Santa Claus is planning on robbing the bank. So when he does rob the bank, he takes the money and shortchanges Christopher Plummer to pin the money on so he could take the money. And Christopher Plummer is this psycho criminal who starts playing this game of cat and mouse with him and wants the rest of the money. So it is incredible Kino Lorber did a release of it a little bit ago and you know, just in terms of specially can exploitation movies, it's like, way up there.

James Jay Edwards:

I've been pretty much buried in award screeners. But there are a couple things that I saw that, that we already have talked about, so I don't want to get too deep into them, but I caught up with them. One is Guillermo del Toro is Pinocchio. Which it is a beautiful movie. And I think they made that GDT made the right choice putting it in fascist Italy because it works. So well. They're Yeah, yeah. And, and Mussolini is even in it. And the other thing I saw, which we talked about on the top 10s list, but not really in depth is The Menu.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, that was one of my favorites this year. Yeah, it is.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, I don't think it would have made my top 10 If I had seen it before, but it's definitely it's funny because I was expecting it to be some kind of cannibalism, most dangerous game kind of a thing. And it's neither. It's you know, it's weird, because it's like, it's not what I expected it to be. But what it is made perfect sense if that makes any sense. You know, it surprised me. But then I was like, Okay, well, how else could you have done this? But yeah, it was it was terrific. And the other thing I watched, which we haven't talked about yet, for my word screening is Wendell and Wild have either you guys seen this?

Jacob Davidson:

No, but it's on my list.

James Jay Edwards:

Yes, it's US Netflix animated with Key and Peele, they play these two demons that they they basically are there's this girl who lost her parents and they're they want to open up their own demonic amusement park and they to get her Help. She's She's a human there, they say they'll bring her parents back. But I mean, it's more complicated than that. That's the that's the elevator pitch for it. But um, it's I mean it's it's funny because it's definitely a horror animated but it is, but it's totally good for kids too. It's like one of those gateway kids horror you know, it's, it's spooky but it's not going to really terrify the pants off anyone but it's a it's a fun little little Netflix cartoon.

Jonathan Correia:

Which we need more of we need more stop motion Yeah, more Kinder trauma. We need more kid friendly gateway horror film. So yeah, that's that's on my list to watch this

Jacob Davidson:

week. Yeah. Also, I just saw Violent Night. Oh, that was that. Yeah, the David Harbour badass Santa movie. It and yeah, it was a lot of fun. I really dug it. Because yeah, it's Santa Claus. Die Hard. And yeah, no, it's just David harbor plays a great Santa for one thing and also it's just very, very interesting to see John Leguizamo play the kind of Hans Gruber bad guy for a change. Because he nailed it.

James Jay Edwards:

He's the bad guy. Yeah, he

Jacob Davidson:

played Yeah, he plays like the mastermind of the like heist that Santa Claus wanders into but also he really hates Christmas. Kind of. So it kind of ties into that. And ya know, he he's having a great time hamming it up and, and somebody else pointed out it's funny because he actually played like one of the henchmen in Die Hard 2. So I'll but ya know, I'm hoping that we get more violent nights and just a an excuse to have David harbor as Santa Claus just killed the shit out of people.

James Jay Edwards:

More violent nights. Have either you guys seen it came out earlier this year, but it's not new at this point at all that movie, Margaux. It's about the smart house. You guys. Have you guys even heard of it? It's it's the one about the smart house. It's named Margaux. No, okay. It's, it's pretty bad. It it's kind of a cool concept. It's like all these college buddies are getting ready to graduate they go off to this. It's it's not it doesn't it's not owned by any of them. But they go to the smart house and you know, this smart house like um, they have to download an app on their phone to open it and all this stuff. And this house talks to them kind of like you know, like a Siri kind of a thing. And of course the house goes crazy and starts you know, killing them and stuff. But where it lost me was it kept doing this thing where it would use this liquid to like 3d print things. And then it also had these Doctor Octopus arms that would come out of like tables and stuff that would like do things for them. And I'm like, this is like, it's one thing to have like a smart house, turn on your TV or you know, turn on your music for you. But now we're getting into Jetsons territory. And that's just kind of like one part they're going to have breakfast and and Margaux is like, I have over 5000 Michigan rated recipes. Let me know what you want. And I'm like, I'll come on, you know, I don't know. And then the payoff when it gets to the payoff, it's it just gets downright stupid.

Jonathan Correia:

It sounds very much so like a horror version of like that Disney Channel movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. Smart House.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, that one was like a kid's horror movie because it's like they get a smart house and then like Katie Segal you know from married with children and all that is like, the the like aI representation of the house and like they start she goes, she goes bonkers and whatnot.

Jacob Davidson:

Like she wants to be the family's mother because the family's mom died and she kind of goes all how Hal 9000 on him.

Jonathan Correia:

I just remembered that one scene where they like pour a bunch of like food on the ground like watch and like the ground shakes and like absorbs they just like never have to vacuum and it's just like,

James Jay Edwards:

it sounds like that one's a more realistic house than that. Yeah, it I mean it. It's a great concept. And I wish that they had gone a different direction with it than they did. But but they didn't. They went the direction it went. So

Jonathan Correia:

the real terror about smart houses and smart devices is the mass amount of data collection that happens with Oh yeah, no one wants to talk about that. I've been extremely busy with work these last few weeks, but I did sneak in another 2022 viewing Have you guys seen Lucky McKee's Old Man? It's interesting. It's about this guy who's hiking through the woods and he ends up in this cabin that has an old man in it played by Stephen Lang. And he's like always walking around into this like red one piece underwear thing that you know, with the butt flap and everything old timey and he's very off the grid just in this cabin. And immediately there's like this back and forth of like, am I dangerous? You know the old man's like, am I dangerous? Am I a danger to me while holding a shotgun in his face. But as the movie progresses, they get to know each other a bit more. And things get really weird. Especially with that third act, the plot and then the twist are a bit predictable you know, it's it's kind of been done before but Stephen Lang gives a really great performance I'm I'm very used to Stephen Lang as like the badass marine and avatar or, you know, the badass blind guy who's very does fucked up shit in Don't Breathe and stuff but he's always like that that older muscular dude who's like badass and this he's very frail He's very kind of fragile, and yet he's still very powerful and dangerous. And there's a there's a few scenes where he's just like, very vulnerable and trembling. And it's, it's a very great performance. It also has Marc Senter, who plays the lost man named Joe. And almost the entire movie takes place just in this cabin with just these two. And there's some great back and forth it's some great acting great monologues would I highly recommend it? I don't know if you if you got some, you know, I I didn't absolutely love it. But I didn't hate the movie. You know, it's pretty solid. For Lucky McKee movie, it was very tame in the blood and gore. But what it did it it did it you know, but it's interesting, Old Man, it's worth checking out. I enjoyed it. I don't think it would have made my top 10 though. I also was up very late last night and I bought this video game called Sagebrush. Jacob, you're the other video you're the video game guy. Have you heard of Sagebush?

Jacob Davidson:

To be honest, no,

Jonathan Correia:

I would highly recommend Sagebrush it's right now on the PlayStation Network for 59 cents. So what do you got to lose? You can play the entire game in like two hours. But sagebrush it's a first person narrative driven like exploration game where you go to this compound that was the site of a very traumatic thing that happened with a cult back in 1993. Very Branch Davidian inspired and you spend the whole game just exploring the compound

James Jay Edwards:

this is like made for you.

Jonathan Correia:

It's super made for me, dude, the the art style, the like graphics and art style is very, like 90s computer super pixelated, but 3d models, and you're just uncovering clues to what happened there. And you don't encounter anybody you don't. There's no like monsters or anything to pop out. But like, you know, the sun goes down as the story progresses. And it's just very unsettling. You're reading a lot of you're picking up and reading a lot of notes, you're finding tape recorders of various cult members talking about it. And it mainly focuses on this one called member Lillian, who had her doubts. And there's, you know, it's very classic, you know, like the cult leader, there's a deceiver amongst us. And you know, their scripture is radically changing to more and more fucked up shit. And I was up late editing the latest episode of talking Titans. And I ended up staying up a little bit long because I was super caffeinated. So I was playing this at two o'clock in the morning, last night, and I got freaked the fuck out. Like, there's one part where you open a door, and there's like a room with a bed and there's like a VHS camcorder and you turn on the light and the whole room glows red. And it's just like, oh, this is not that not good stuff happened in here. That's not even the most disturbing room in the game. And then later on, when it's like pitch blackout, you have to go back to that house. And the only way you can really see it is because if if you left the red light on, you can see the windows off in the distance glowing red, and it's just sagebrush, again. 59 cents, even when it's not on sale. It's like five or six bucks. Like it's two hours. It's like it's like a whole movie that you play. It's gonna save

James Jay Edwards:

somebody who knows the story should do a recording of it. And you know, because I don't really have any interest in playing this game. But I would like to see somebody else play

Jacob Davidson:

I know there's lots of I'm sure there's lots of Let's Plays of it on YouTube. You know, there's a market for it.

Jonathan Correia:

Come over, I'll play it for you.

James Jay Edwards:

What platform is it for?

Jonathan Correia:

So it's, it's on PlayStation. That's where I played it. It's also on Steam and it's on all the others. It's an indie game. It was made by this it was just one guy. Pretty much that made it and he voiced when a voice to like the cult leader think it's sisters someone I saw on the credits a lot of the same last names. But yeah, I did a little reading he spent like a year and a half on it. And it's it's very effective. It's it goes to show like you don't need the flashiest graphics, you don't need the like most insane like boss battles or anything sometimes like just having a very strong narrative narrative and a very strong like idea works very effectively. And yeah, I it again, it creeped the shit out of me. So

Jacob Davidson:

it's definitely sounds like one of those games that gets in your head. Yeah, I'm on the other side of things. I actually got another horror game recently. Have either of you heard of the Callisto protocol

Jonathan Correia:

that name Sounds familiar.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, it's a new survival sci fi horror game. It was made by the guys who made Deadspace did either you play those?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, I was all about deadspace and deadspace two when those games came out. I am so mad the remaster is not coming to ps4.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, me too, because it's I don't even know how to get a PlayStation five. Even if I wanted to get one. Callisto protocol came out for PlayStation four. So I was able to get that and ya know, it's very much in line with that kind of sci fi horror. And it's a really fun concept because it's basically your you fly cargo for this prison on Callisto, the on the moon, if it's like one of the moons of Jupiter, and your starship is attacked and you crash back onto the prison and then you're arrested and imprisoned. And when you wake up like all hell's broken loose, like there's a riot and explosions and like all the prisoners are free. But there's also this like virus viral infection going around, that's mutating the prisoners and people into these horrible mutants, with lots of goo and tentacles and all that stuff. And you have to fight your way through the bowels of the prison to try and get out. And, ya know, it's very much a spiritual sequel to Deadspace it's got similar mechanics and some pretty decent creature design. And, you know, this is one of the things where, like, I had to put it down after a while because it was just getting me to tense but I mean, I'm gonna get back into it, but ya know, it's pretty effective. And yeah, I've always been, I've always been a fan of that space games. And yeah, it's too bad about, you know, the remake only being PlayStation five exclusive. So yeah, I'm glad I was able to kind of get back into that with Callisto protocol. been pretty

James Jay Edwards:

And now we have a couple of very special good so far. guests. We have the producer and one of the stars of the movie, 1BR. Let's welcome Alok Mishra and Naomi Grossman, how you guys doing?

Naomi Grossman:

Great.

Alok Mishra:

Good. Very good. Thanks for having us.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Welcome to the show.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, thanks for being here. The question that I always like to start with, and let's, let's start with you, Naomi. How did you get started in the industry? How did you get started acting?

Naomi Grossman:

Um, what's before conception? Um, no, I mean, listen, I'm not like Drew Barrymore or anything. But I definitely from a very young age, I knew exactly what I, you know, wanted to be when I grew up, unfortunately, this was in Denver, Colorado, where there was really very little to do other than, you know, Father dwelling mysteries, and, you know, Perry Mason, and regional commercials and, you know, regional theater. So, so that's what I did, for a really long time until, you know, until I could go actually took a brief respite to Argentina, vamos Argentina, we're celebrating World Cup today. But, and then from there, I went to, you know, Drama School in Chicago. And after four years of winter, I was done with that and moved out to LA. To, you know, be a big movie star, but, and actually, I met Alok soon after, one of my best friends in high school games, rather, in college, was one of his best friends in high school. So, um, you know, I got to meet him early on, I didn't realize that I was, you know, networking from the very start. But anyway, that doesn't really answer your question. But, um, but yeah, I mean, I did, I would say I got my SAG card on my 15th birthday, again, that was sort of kiss his death in Denver, because there was really like, no union, there was nothing to do there. Other than, you know, get old enough to leave home and, you know, come to Hollywood, but, but I did that, as soon as I could. I'm gonna

Alok Mishra:

say she's also been very humble. Because she's like, I went to drama school. She went to drama school at Northwestern, with like, you know, people like Zach Braff and Seth Meyers. And you know, those people. So she's being very humble when she says, a drama school. Anyway. So, actually, that I was, you know, I'm in the, you know, my father was a doctor, you know, Indian people want you to be a doctor, lawyer, engineer, and kind of thing and like, and I told my dad, I'll be a doctor, because I was, you know, interested in it intellectually. But I didn't love it. And literally, when I got to the point where I took the MCAT, and scored well enough to get in, and I was like, I'm not doing it to add on it to entertainment. It's been, like, so broke apart for man. But he was very, you know, very supportive. And so what I fell into was something that was sort of interested similar to what I had been doing with medicine in terms of like research and multiple whatever, I hold on to movie market research. So I tested with these for a living. So I did that for like, 18 years until the point where I had kind of a what is it all about sort of moments? And I was like, Look, I test all these shitty movies. I know I can make a shitty good movie or, you know, so I decided I was gonna do it. And you know, One of the things that of this movie as well, you know, me i allegedly, you know, mortgage and already paid off to make this 1BR movie and we're talking about today. So that's, that's my origin story and I'm sticking by it.

Jonathan Correia:

Wow. mortgaged the house against it, huh?

Alok Mishra:

sometimes you gotta believe in yourself you bet on yourself. It's what it is. But the script the script, it's a really good script. And so like, you know, the reason we got that script is that Allard Cantor and Jarrod Murray, who are also producers in the film, they're also David Marmor, who's a writer, director of a fantastic writer, director, there his managers, and it just turns out that Allard went to high school with my ex wife. And you know, before we were an ex, ex wife, whatever, and we went up on those douchebag lunches so you have you talked about yourself and what you're working on and, and he's like, ah, you know, I got to script I'm gonna send you. I'm gonna send you this script Tragedy Girl, and we'll send you 1BR. And like six months later, I haven't read the script. The six months later, into my defense, I was working on something, we're almost ready to go on it and it fell apart. And I was like, What the fuck? I gotta find something else. I'm sorry. Can I curse on this thing? Or is it okay? Go ahead. Okay. All right. So sorry. Anyway, so long short, though, I found that I went back and I started reading all the scripts I was supposed to catch up on and tragedy girls was like a horror comedy. I told them like, look, it's a great script, but I will never do a horror comedy. It's too hard to make both the audiences happy, because I've learned that from testing things, you know, and they're like, Well, we already finished filming that last week. And I was like, Well, what the fuck do I know? So, but I love one viewer that would David Marmor and him and myself and my, my producing partner, Shane Vorster. We're kindred spirits. He's super intelligent. I mean, just super bright guy. And there's a very affable person, like he's a good person. And we were really in this as he was a first time writing director, we were first time producers. And we were literally in it for the long haul. Because, you know, we got the script in 2017. And like the spring, actually gave us a Naomi Naomi right away back. Because I was like, Do you think like, is this good? You know, I think there's a part for you. It's not like the main but you know, it's something that she was like, Yeah, this is a good script. Like, she always says that her dad's an architect, and you like, Wow, man, it's nice to have good bones like that. I got like a piece of property, you know, whatever. So it did. And, like, come December 2017. We were shooting it. So that's how we got involved with it.

Jonathan Correia:

Wow. And then it, it came out on Netflix, very early in the pandemic. I remember, it was one of those ones that like early pandemic, it was 1BR and Host a lot. We're getting talked about a lot. What was that kind of whirlwind experience of

Alok Mishra:

what specifically happened was that, okay, Netflix rejected us twice. I'm just gonna say that, okay. And we were just, you know, begging them. And when we came out, in April 2020, we came out on T bought, like, on like, all the different platforms and stuff. And it did incredibly well. Like, I mean, it was like, number like, you know, two or three, I think three on an iTunes like car and everyone was like losing movie about like, there's like, you know, Naomi Grossman's a recognizable person. So it was Taylor Nichols, and some of them but like, by and large, no one would recognize the person on the poster, for example, because it's her first movie, right for his narrative feature. And so it did really well. And crazily, so to the point that we went back to Netflix are like, wow, like, I would have done the numbers and they're like, alright, we'll take you, we'll give you no money. But we'll take Thank you. So, so we were, you know, over the moon, and we knew basically in May, that they were going to take us in, in August of 2020. And so we literally like Naomi and I, and some other cast mates, like we had nothing to do, right, like, all summer long. And we knew we were coming out in England and places like that. So we're just like, everyday got up of like, I'm gonna sell 100 copies of this movie, but my force of will I'm gonna do it. So I just like, started, like, you know, approaching different reviewers who hadn't seen the movie, for example, I look on Rotten Tomatoes. And I looked for like, a Pete the ship movie. And I'm like, Who gave out a good review? All right, if they like that, they're certainly going to, like, approach people and be like, Hey, I'm just doing a post mortem about our movie and seeing how our Republicans did. And did you send you the movie? Did he send you the movie? And they're like, no, they didn't send me the movie. Let me write that wrong. Let me send you the movie, right. Like watch the movie. And so we keep on pumping out reviews, even after we came out. And often because now we're coming out England, different places. It's always that awareness. Like, you know, we talk about a lifespan of a movie, right? And what people don't realize specifically, is that about 40% That is actually the pre production, the actual, like production and then post production, right? But the other 60% is marketing the film, right and people don't realize that and people don't keep on like putting new things up on social media or whatever it is. Isn't that the weekend? So we did that. And by the time we came out on, you know, Netflix, the very first day, we were on Netflix, we were in their top five. And I was like, I don't know, like 73 million households. Thankfully, there's 2.11 people in each household, right? There's 192 million people that Netflix knows it has. That's not they're not feeling it from them, right? Like, that's what they know. So it's like crazy, like, right? Like, you would never think that like that you could get to that many people, but you can have 190 million people have access to Netflix. And so we figured out that, like, you know, hitting the top five is like rarefied air, you just don't do it, like for a small film like ours. And not only do we do it, well, we were in the top five and got to number one, over eight days, we were basically in the top five, number one eventually. And it was like the craziest thing, like, I mean, I literally felt like we had like, just gotten to the top of Mount Rushmore, or whatever it is Kilimanjaro. And I was just like, I cried, because I was like, we be talking all our plan. We did. Like he worked. Like we went on a food festival run, in addition to that, to build awareness of the film. But these are things that people like don't really realize, if you do have a film that like, you know, tests very well, it's empty in quotation marks right now. You know, when you test a movie, it scores this way. Excellent. Very good, good, fair, poor. Well, we did like one of the test screenings of it that were just like 20 people, and we do a focus group for them. And then we called our data, you learned a lot of stuff from it. And we learned that we had very little rejection in the film. And people would rate it like very good, not excellent, because we couldn't, we couldn't afford to be excellent, frankly. But it was it was very good. So we knew we didn't have a lot of rejection. So that was fantastic. And so we knew when it came on to Netflix, it could do well if we had enough awareness. And that's the tough part of it is like rising above sort of that noise because there's like so many horror movies that come out. I mean, how many like killer shark killer clown? Killer Clown shark movies are there? Right? So many?

Naomi Grossman:

What do you mean, you couldn't afford to be higher on Rotten Tomatoes? Like you don't to buy it?

Alok Mishra:

No, no, no, but I'm saying this. Like, we couldn't afford to be better. Like we had more money. Maybe we could have more time. Make a better film, for example. So that's what I mean. Like we we shot for 15 days. We went back and did four days of reshoots. Actually, we shot in 2017, December, and then we couldn't get the band back together. And so to speak, Naomi Grossman, especially busy, she had been nominated for an Emmy, when we had to actually get her the only week we could do it was the week of the Emmys. You should get to go to a gifting speed and get you know, what's a trip to Barbados.

Naomi Grossman:

This is what he does. By the way, this is what he does. He picks the most important day, like the day my team is going to win the World Cup, and then ropes me into a podcast. He picks the day that I'm going to be gifted like, you know, trips to Barbados, and he makes me come you know, shoot his

Alok Mishra:

shooting. Let's share the little film. Yeah,

Naomi Grossman:

that's the other thing he does. He has a quota like literally a number of curse words that he has to meet by the end of any podcast in order to act like adequately upset my mom. religiously. Yeah, yeah. So

Alok Mishra:

he thinks I can do better he thinks I can be better and the sad truth is I can't I'm just what I am

Naomi Grossman:

she's an englisg teacher she believes in you Alok

Alok Mishra:

whatever believe in somebody that didn't never gonna fulfill that belief

Jonathan Correia:

in your in your defense. I'm usually the one that swearing most of the podcasts so

James Jay Edwards:

he's the reason we click that explicit when we publish. It's always Correia

Jonathan Correia:

there was one or two times where we almost got to the end of the episode and there was just like something that set me off I just went fuckers or something. Jay was like shit, we gotta click that box.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, I always do it anyway. I don't even count

Naomi Grossman:

actually got flagged just yesterday, I posted anymore a little you know, Argentine of course of the thing on YouTube. And it was really just a quick like, tick tock of me kind of looking lecherous with Messi, of course. You know, the star, the Argentine team. And there are people literally commenting like there are children on this app. Like, like, over a woman like kind of like salivating over a soccer player? Like, it's not porn, calm down.

James Jay Edwards:

Anyway, there are worse things out there.

Jonathan Correia:

There's way worse things on YouTube, especially Come on.

James Jay Edwards:

Do you think it was the one thing I was put on our radar by Devin Burrows, who was the composer for The Wretched and he had because when we asked him what, you know, what excites him about what's coming out now. And he had mentioned the film and in particular the score, and that's what put it on our radar. And this was when I FC which went to did The Wretched was putting everything up to drive ins and on pay per view because of the pandemic. Do you think that the pandemic and people, you know, basically being locked up and quarantined had anything to do with how popular not just your guys movie but in Netflix in general? I mean, since they were locked up, there's nothing to do but what street? I know streaming services went through the through the roof. How much do you think that that actually helped your guys' movie get to number one?

Naomi Grossman:

I mean, a lot. I mean, I don't know. Alok is probably done this research. That's the other thing. He does a ton of research. He's amazing at it. He really, you know, I'll sing his praises. There at one point, I remember him calling and saying, Hey, will you buy the, you know, it was like 11 o'clock at night. He's like, Hey, can you quick buy the movie on iTunes? And I'm like, okay, like, he's like, I'll pay you back on Venmo you five bucks down. Like, okay. Literally, His thing was, he knew that, like, at midnight on that night is the night that it like rolls over. And they, you know, the horror charts on iTunes, you know, repopulate or whatever it is. And, and he if he could just get enough people to, like buy the movie all at once, like within the hour, like maybe he could, you know, play the system somehow. And he did. Like, I don't know if that was the well, he made number one.

Alok Mishra:

But we didn't, we went to number two. But like, the thing was, I was just trying to I wanted to try and experiment. I was like, look for five that we were down to $5 to like, do whatever that's like for $5. I'm willing to spend like $200 to see if it actually bumps us like because we were something went down in price. We were like at number like five or something like that. But we were able to get like number two or three or something because like, I don't know, 40 people, like bought it all at once. Just like right before midnight, and like these coats has already gone to bed at three o'clock in the morning. I just wanted to experiment. And so yeah, so we did it. Like they didn't move back. And they got that on the movie, you might not you know, but anyway, I do stupid shit like that all the time, just to kind of like see what's what. Yeah, it was an interesting thing. What was the initial question? Sorry, you were saying I was gonna answer but I forget what it was it?

Naomi Grossman:

No did the pandemic probably. It's so meta, like, we're all home. We're all streaming, why not stream a movie about a woman trapped at home. Like, and

Alok Mishra:

also, you can't trust your neighbors. Like, that's the whole thing. Like there's a responsibility to not put a mask up and do different things. And so this was very meta, we couldn't have planned that the pandemic was going on. And this would be like what it was, but it actually did become something more than it was for for just that reason, you know, so that's, that's actually, I think, to your point, it is the the Not only were the streaming services like doing go off auto business, as they call it here in the town or whatever. But they were they were, you know, we they were lacking content to which may have been one of the reasons they said all right, let's take a chance on your kids, you know, and again, hey, you know, money. But so that's I was very, I think it was very, that was very much the case to also say about the wretched the Pierce brothers who are buddies, we actually came out we premiered both premiered at Fantasia Fest in Montreal, and we took our whole cast up there and they brought their people and so we were like no mono mono the entire time and we were just like you know, first we were just like an Eric competition or their friends were like friends we can't we became friends we became friends and like literally just saw another movie by their producer here at beyond fest here in LA, which was Feed Me just some fantastic films about cannibalism that you know, it's like flicked up like that movie is great. It's great you got to watch it if you like you know if you want to say something really cool, though identity that produced it also did wretched and the Pierce brothers have moved on to amazingly greener pastures, and that they're doing a film for Screen Gems. And who were the guys that wrote? Black Phone and Sinister

James Jay Edwards:

They're Scott Derrickson and Robert Cargill

Alok Mishra:

Robert Cargill loves our movie do by the way, which I'm fanboy get up here in a really nice Twitter thing about that, but they're doing they're producing their new movie that screen Jim's putting out and so much bigger budget and the wretched was so big kudos for that. So that's the reason we all became friends and then that maybe the reason that the the the composer mentioned mentioned us it's a way bringing it full circle.

James Jay Edwards:

It probably was just, I don't think any filmmaker should ever be considered competition. I think everybody should be part versus a community, not a competition. That's,

Alok Mishra:

that's what we've learned. I mean, I have a four and a half year old, right? I have a four and a half year old. And I was trying to explain to her because we had gone to Universal Studios on on Thursday night, and she saw the jaws thing and she's we've been there like eight times this year, we have a path. And I was trying to explain to her, we watched Goonies, and then we watch Gremlins, and I was trying to explain to her well, there's a guy, Steven Spielberg, who helped these people along and all these people guide me to Star Wars. They're best friends. And then he made a movie called radiant love. I don't tell him like these the 70s they had this whole motto or whatever, where these are John Millia. Spielberg and Luca literally exchange points on three of their movies just like sight unseen, like they look, you have Jaws coming out. I'm gonna give you a point. You know, Star Wars coming out. I'm gonna give you a point you have some shitty surfing movie. I'm really good. Like, ran away like a bandit. Fucking like money. And like Spielberg and Lucas were legless. Look at the bigger because they did a round robin. Look at the left holding the bag really? Big. So but but yeah, you're right. You're right. We should all help each other. That's the main thing. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

But it's such a small community, too. I mean, we're talking about all these different connections. And then after we interviewed Devin, he ended up his score was put out by Ship to Shore, which is my buddy, Justin. So I mean, it's it's small worlds all over. Which, which is awesome. And then you just, I meant I'm loving hearing the grasp. Because this is a grassroots campaign of you guys getting this movie out. I mean, even you guys coming out on the podcast today, you reached out to us, because you guys are gonna be doing another big push to even more ao V. D, and streaming services. Soon, too, right? Yeah, we're

Alok Mishra:

gonna be on. So as of January one, we are leaving We're big fans of Tubi Yeah, Netflix for now. But I have a suspicion we'll be back. They took us off for six months before and then brought us back on and then the numbers were higher and whatever, I get the method to their madness, but that's okay. The main thing is that we're on Shudder at present, we're going to be on January one, we are launching on Peacock, Tubi, three V, flex, Roku TV, Pluto TV. And then zumo I want to say that I think we love Tubi that's all of them. Just one, but but it's gonna be on a bunch of different ones. And I'll say that for independent filmmakers, these platforms for the way we make our money. I gotta admit, we didn't make ship from Netflix, I'm just gonna tell the truth. But for these light platforms, if you watch the We have so many movies on it. I mean, so here's the thing, I was whole movie, you get paid off of basically how many commercials there are. And I'll say this, too. The commercials are very short to the point that you can't even go pee, and then come back. And you'll you'll have missed the movie. Like you'll have to like rewind the movie, because they're they're that short. There's, there's there they come in, you know, fairly frequently, depending on the platform. But the most that we get paid on if you can like really watch these two platforms having a meeting with the to be original. It's like, you know, a in particular, Tubi. We would really appreciate it. Thank you. year ago, something like this during the pandemic. And I tried to scroll. Like I had Apple TV. I was scrolling through to be an hour and 25 minutes later, I got to the end of the horror movie section. And I can't tell you how many like shark movies found movies. Clown shark movies, like I said before, they're literally clown shark movies. Like there's so many movies on there. And the woman who was I was meeting with was just so impressed that had gone through the whole thing. I've never met somebody who actually girl through the whole thing will you do? Well, for certain point it became a mission because I was like scrolling and scrolling and scrolling. I'm like, What is this? I'm doing this an hour. When can this end? I gotta get to the end. Doesn't my quest sorry, though.

Jonathan Correia:

I think too deep cuts to buddy. Justin LaLiberty with Vinegar Syndrome posted about how he found a movie on there and it opened up with this is a VHS promo for a movie, a VHS screener. They just straight rip the VHS which is fun. I respect the shit.

James Jay Edwards:

It's it's ballsy. Yeah. So we we kind of have this we love movies that do what we say becomes a different movie. And that's kind of what 1BR does. For me not knowing much going into it. It is not the movie I expected it to be I expect it to be kind of like a singular stocking kind of almost like a like a you know, guy living in the walls kind of thing. And it is not that movie. It's it's more visceral, it's more brutal and it's more cerebral. And also, it leaves itself open very much to a sequel or not just a sequel, but to a bigger universe at the end. And you guys have a sequel in the works correct?

Alok Mishra:

We do, Naomi Do you want to say something about it

Naomi Grossman:

mean, it's so under wraps, you know, a look like to Well, I don't want to steal one of his curse words from him, but he likes to, again, Mom, I'm using quotes. So don't think that I'm saying these are not my words, but he likes to JJ Abrams the shit out of everything. So he won't even tell me I haven't even read it. All I know is Genesis back. Back and she's looking for love. No, I don't know, I know. You know, let's face it. She's a widow. So

Alok Mishra:

I don't know how much we want to give away. I mean, do we want to give away we can give away? We know

Naomi Grossman:

that right? We've seen the movie. So we know that. Although you're right, just because you die in a horror movie. You can't kill a good horror movie like, No, you're right, we could see him in a prequel we could see him as a, as a drunken apparition. There's a million ways to go, we can see. But also jammas could also I mean, there's a lot of I know nothing.

Alok Mishra:

I'll say this, I'll say this. So the first one was alien. The second one is aliens. Like, it's definitely like a bigger, sort of look into that universe and things you thought were one way could be a little turned a wet rat turned around in certain regards. It's, it's a fantastic script, like I read it three times. And then we just had a couple of notes and and give it back to Marmor, our brilliant writer, director. And he just like, he's gonna, we're getting something on the 23rd, which is this week, December 23. So, you know, hopefully, after this is airing, you'll you'll it will be passed that. And we already have the script in our hand. We're already budgeting we're already like figuring stuff out. But it's gonna be it's gonna be super cool. It's gonna be, like I said, bigger universe, much bigger budget, in comparison to the first one, which was like, you know, sag ultra low budget film, this is gonna put us into a couple of categories above that. But yeah, like, look, I mean, the other thing we're actually thinking about tonight is kind of a first I haven't really mentioned this any other place is definitely a theatrical run for it. Awesome. We, we think that it, you know, everyone was like, terrified, and you did so well, can't you do this? Well, like, terrifying, do amazing following. They didn't do any fucking like, basically marketing for that movie. But just on the strength of how well it had done, like in the, you know, streaming platforms and stuff, they was able to have this amazing. I mean, I think it's almost $13 million now or something like that. And, you know, frankly, there's not enough studio content for the theaters right now. Like, they don't have 52 weeks of content. And so we really feel like, you know, a 1BR or something that's had a lot of exposure and a lot of like, sort of like notoriety and, you know, in a nice, respectful way, can actually do fairly well, hopefully, you know, in that in that context, and you know, pay off pay off the bigger budget for money grubbing producers. And we shall see, we shall see,

Jonathan Correia:

hopefully don't have to mortgage the house again for it, right. No, that's not

Alok Mishra:

happening again. That makes that may or may not be divorced. I mean, whatever. It's all good. I have a lovely four year old daughter. She's amazing. So it's ammicable. That's the good news. It's ammicable. She's not taking me for like dental cleaners. But let's go look. What I've done it any differently. No, I wouldn't have done anything differently. Fucking producers and directors in the indie space. It's like the wild wild west. Sometimes you just gotta put your balls on the table and say, I'm gonna do this and you do it. And then it turns out, okay. So anyway, that's it. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And did you drop hints on the title? Because we were talking earlier about what the title could be, you know, cracking the is it going to be 2BR?

Alok Mishra:

It's not 2BR

Jonathan Correia: it's not 1BR:

The Second Story

Alok Mishra:

Everyone's great. But I will tell you a little something. I will say this, the title 1BR was very purposeful, and so much is that on certain platforms, you will be numbers first, and then alphabet after that. And so 1BR is typically like, for example, peacock does it this way. And peacock also puts your Rotten Tomatoes score up there too, right? So if you have a 1BR and is 88 percent Certified Fresh, we had a pub, we had a publicist at one point and told us like, ah, horror, it doesn't really matter what the fucking score is. And we're like, Are you out of your mind? Like, you know, it matters because not only because, you know, these new platforms have that up there. But like for Netflix, for example, they have different categories, right? They have like 40 different categories. I looked at this every morning right to see how many categories we are propagating. That's it right? And one of them is critically acclaimed movies, critically acclaimed thrillers, critically acclaimed, independent films, whatever. So you have another category that you will be in, because you've done well on Rotten Tomatoes. So if anybody ever tells anybody that Rotten Tomatoes doesn't matter, they're a moron.

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, there are people I know who, who actually seek out the poorly rated movies, just because, I mean, I'm one of those I love bad movies, but I also love good movies. So it's, yeah, I having a high Rotten Tomato score is

Alok Mishra:

But here's the here's the thing. It doesn't never going to hurt you. hurt you if your movie is skirting the line between two genres, right? So they may be right with horror movies. Like I say, people like the shitty movies, or they like they seek these things out. Right? But if you have a psychological thriller with elements of horror, right, and it splits two lines, then you have a different audience who's going to look at it and be like, Well, what's this about? It doesn't really start anybody I know, like, I know their face, but I don't know them by their name. So what oh, 88% Oh, okay. That's a good chance, I'll spend four bucks, or, you know, whatever it is. So that's the mentality that needs to be there. And I don't think sadly, a lot of filmmakers, filmmakers, journalists have their distributors who may not be leading them down, leading them down the right right path. And you have to like stand your ground, like as filmmakers is with creatives, like you have to be like, no, no, like, I used to fucking test movies for 18 years. I fucking know what this means. So fuck you with this you know? Fuck you playing fucking too much. I'm sorry Naomi's mom. To

Naomi Grossman:

some of these will go on these counters the next one alone so

Jonathan Correia:

no, Naomi I would be I would regret if I didn't bring up your iconic role as Pepper on American Horror Story because first of all I mean Freaks was my gateway horror as a kid. So when you showed up in season two as as pepper, the Pinhead ah, was immediately love and you're you were one of the first characters to actually come back in the show. And so now you've been in asylum freak show. And now you even had your own story for stories, right?

Naomi Grossman:

Yeah, I, um, you may have missed me and And it's such a great legacy legacy character. How willing apocalypse. I was. People actually were like, Oh, it was so nice to see you playing yourself. I was like, I sound a virgin. Like, that's, that's I was still a character. I was like, but I was a Satanist. Yes. Actually, I was. I remember preparing for that role. On a floaty toy, reading the Satanic Bible in my pool, you know, neighbors walking by like, what's happening? Like? I'm not to be confused when when they recognize me in 1BR during the pandemic, and they were like, oh my god, she lives next door. We were already afraid enough of are you to come back as Pepper again? I mean, you've already our neighbors. But ya know, so indeed, I was indeed the first crossover character of from Freak show. From asylum to freak show. But then yes, came back in in Apocalypse. And then yes, in stories as well. That's awesome. done it a few times. Like, I mean, yeah. Don't get me wrong. I'm enjoying having hair. I'm actually very thankful that this is not a video today because I'm sporting some really dumb looking Princess Leia. Little hairdo now, but

Jonathan Correia:

Nah it's cute. Don't worry about it.

Naomi Grossman:

Um, I mean, it was an early morning. Like I said, the game was at like, seven in the morning here in LA. But uh, yeah, we, um, oh, I didn't know. Listen, if there's anything I've learned. It's just hair. Like on any moment, all you got to do is say shave her head. And I'll say how short like, let's do this. You know what I mean? Like, of course, and but people always say that, would you be willing to come back like, I need I want to pay my mortgage as much as anyone. So yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

of course. And, and I relate to the satanic book. I brought a copy of Satanic Feminism in the 1800s with me on the road. So I was like, in the hotel in Texas reading that, and I definitely got of looks

Naomi Grossman:

Awesome choice. Yeah. Oh, yeah. In Texas, no less. That's great. Yeah.

Alok Mishra:

Well, I'll say something about that, actually, in a weird way. So I'm working on a project with Peter Polk, who's our executive producer of 1BR there's also Ty West's producer. And he did like you know, X for example, and Pearl this year and like all Ty West stuff, and we're working on like a TV show together with Eduardo Sanchez, who did like Blair Witch, for example. So, Eduardo tells us like, and we are working with another person we can't mentioned. But the point though, Eduardo tells us, Hey, I'm coming into town. I'm doing an episode of This American Horror Stories. And I'm coming into town this week, let's let's meet up, let's get some drinks and tacos or whatever the fuck we're gonna do LA style. And then Naomi comes to me, and she's like, you know, just between you and me. Book this thing. I can't talk about it. And it's this American Horror Stories. And I'm like, What are you shooting this because Edwardos coming in. And it turned out he was directing her episode. Oh, she plays Rude Ruth or whatever. That's a character that she plays in the episode. And so we all went out to tacos together. And then we went back to Naomi's house in a pool where she reads The Satanic Verses or whatever, we went swimming. And we like, you know, had some, you know, whatever fun, you know, adibles are legal here.

Naomi Grossman:

What does that mean? Whatever fun.

Alok Mishra:

I mean, we drink some stuff. And we drank the beer. And we have

James Jay Edwards:

Naomi's mom is listening. Careful

Alok Mishra:

Someone ate an Edible, and it wasn't Naomi. But anyway, long story short, they got to talk to each other because they don't ever no one ever knows when they're shooting something like, never gonna talk to the director ahead of time or whatever. And he was like, Look, you just gotta watch the Cannibal Holocaust. Get ready for this role. But watch this movie. That's what he told her. So,

Naomi Grossman:

you know, Alok is referring to the fact that the show is so secretive and you know, and it's true. And but it's also true that the that actors rarely, you know, we usually get to meet the director like on the day, like five minutes before he's calling action. He's introducing himself so it's very rare to have that kind of special one on one time to you know, sit and allegedly have some fun together, or whatever.

Alok Mishra:

That was the craziest thing is that like, I literally just pieced it together. It's like you're coming out here. Naomi is actually shooting this show. I think that they're doing the same show.

James Jay Edwards:

Put it together Colombo style.

Alok Mishra:

That's what I did. I was like

James Jay Edwards:

alright, cool. Well, thank you for joining us today. Especially after your after your your big win in the World Cup

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah Congrats, Argentina!

Naomi Grossman:

Thank you,

Alok Mishra:

Bob. Bamos Argentina.

James Jay Edwards:

sequel to 1BR You say you're shooting this coming summer. So when do you expect the street like early next year?

Alok Mishra:

Well, it's spring or late spring, or we're thinking at this point, let's see. I would love to bring it out in October if we can get finished in time, which I think is a pretty aggressive schedule. But we have more money this time. So we have more people working on it more full time. And so it's not like you know, who was before we like you know, we don't have money, it takes a lot of time. If you have money, it's quicker. But I'd like to bring it up then. Or in January of 2024 We'll see what makes sense we don't want to like you know, under undercooked this thing we want to make it so it's like everything you know, who should be and you know, there could be other ones coming in addition, so that that particular brand

James Jay Edwards:

again, it leaves itself open to a whole universe. So I mean, I can see like you said JJ Abrams the shit out of it, I can see a Cloverfield thing happening where you go to different parts in the universe. So

Alok Mishra:

I mean, look, you can go to different countries if you wanted to,

Jonathan Correia:

with, with how it ends. That's not just a very LA it's a very LA thing. The how with the ending in the in the building owners and stuff, you know, you see that a lot definitely renting in the valley. That definitely brought back a lot of like, I've been to that showing I've been to that open house I've been to I know that building.

Alok Mishra:

Everyone who's lived in LA has lived in that apartment complex. Like planes, stucco, shitty, whatever. But no one was that friendly.

Jonathan Correia:

No one is that friendly! No one is that friendly in LA that was a huge red flag for me in the beginning. I was like, none of us are that friendly in LA

Alok Mishra:

I mean, the point the funny thing is when you look at if you really look at how unfriendly people are on LA, it does set up all kinds of really, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

thanks for joining us and we will keep an eye out for that. Where can people find you on the socials if they want to keep up either for the latest 1BR news or the latest in what you guys are doing.

Naomi Grossman:

I at NaomiWGrossman across all platforms. I think I still have my blue checkmark. I don't know I haven't checked.

James Jay Edwards:

You haven't paid for it

Naomi Grossman:

Elon hasn't taken it away by now. I didn't pay the $8. So I just have to hope.

James Jay Edwards:

I think they have legacy people who had it before. but there's like a disclaimer now saying it says exactly the opposite of what it means. It says this has not been vetted, which it has been vetted if your legacy but of course, I don't know he's trying to get the eight bucks from

Naomi Grossman:

you been vetted by the puppeteer. You know, Elon, okay. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

How about you Alok

Alok Mishra:

1BR_film. We're mostly on Twitter, sadly, I don't know if that's the best idea sadly. We're so close to getting to 5000 and get that fucking blue checkmark. And now I don't know. I don't know. Like if I can pay for it now. And there's no challenge to it. But we're there. We're, you know, we're on Instagram or on Facebook. Facebook and Twitter are kind of what we're mostly on. Let's say if you watch a movie and you liked the the please tell your friends. I will say this the other score when you're testing movies, for example, that matters? Would you definitely recommend it for a friend. And generally we find with this movie, it's a discovery movie people like don't think it's they think it's gonna be like, I don't know, something supernatural like that. And turns out to be something completely different. And each actor kind of almost turns to some extent without giving too much away. And because of that, people tend they like it. They love it in a weird way. And then they tell their friends hopefully, and that will would ask if you do like it, please tell your friends. Please tweet about it. Please mention on Facebook, please mention on social media, it helps a little film like this kind of like go to another level. And like I said, if if you know the sequel is going to come out hopefully this year, or very beginning of next year. And that enough people will have watched it that will really enjoy this equal play. That's that's our that's our idea. And that's our

Jonathan Correia:

hope, and really watch it on Tubi right

Alok Mishra:

Tubi and Freevee Tubi and Freevee Tubi and Freevee but Tubi more than anything else because they pay more

James Jay Edwards:

and watch watch the whole thing. Because with well, you know,

Alok Mishra:

here's the thing, here's what we know, clandestinely, but, you know, we have like kind of a 75% retention rate. Really like 75% of people actually watch the whole thing, allegedly. But we think that they like it so much. And they tell their friends that hopefully the second one will be even more popular, hopefully, let's say Fingers crossed.

James Jay Edwards:

Word is. If they don't finish a movie, it's because it's too scary. Have you guys seen that? That's ridiculous. They say this is the scariest movie on Netflix. No one can finish it. Oh, no, people turn it off because it sucks. Well, you know,

Alok Mishra:

there's a lot of things on Netflix that stuck.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I know. I just like to try it.

Alok Mishra:

I mean, it's what it is, you know, it's so funny. Like for this this movie that like was a no budget film that had like we I don't think we even talked about it'd be horrible challenges that we had making the film and stuff. You know, we lost we lost our entire cast three days before we were shooting. I don't know if you guys saw that I shared that article. I forget if I sent it to you or not. Let me write an article on a movie maker magazine about all the horrible shit that went wrong with this film. And one of them was we had a fire. We had a Mulholland fire that happened. Right during pre production. And we didn't know if our production office had burned down or not. And we were like looking on Google Earth to see if it had burned down. But we knew we were like right next door to the veterans graveyard. They would never let that burn twice like convinced on this thing like that. They were like dumping a lot of water on it. But but but and then that was one thing and then like literally we're the Monday we're shooting on Thursday. We lose our lead actress, the woman who was posted play Sarah, actually famous TV actress I cannot mention because of libel or some bullshit. She made us hire her friend or boyfriend I'm not sure it's

Naomi Grossman:

Do we have time for this the story? Alok. We were literally signing off giving them

Alok Mishra:

I was telling them a story

Naomi Grossman:

again, we've just come from a soccer game.

Alok Mishra:

I was drinking.

Naomi Grossman:

Aleggedly had some whatever fun there.

Alok Mishra:

And funny story.

Naomi Grossman:

It is I there may be some editing necessary now.

Alok Mishra:

We'll end with a story real quick. So we basically lost all of our cast our Sarach character or Brian character, and our MS Stanhope character. And what had what had happened was that

Naomi Grossman:

not your Janis, but not

Alok Mishra:

Janis lucking is awesome. Thank you to Taylor Nichols. Nichols or you know, leader. The point that was that? What happened at this TV actress that dropped out, she made us

Naomi Grossman:

Actors just wanna work. That's why you know, hire her quote unquote, like friend, boyfriend. We don't know what the fuck he was. He was on some fucking CW vampire show that we were like, well, if it's good enough for the shitty vampire show, if hes good enough for the CW, it's good enough for us to be fine, but he dropped out. And then we went to a bar and hanging out to kind of regroup and see what's going on. And we got a call and then it's Dan and character. Her husband had collapsed, rushed to the hospital. He was dead. And so she was out too. And so now we're like, starting on Thursday, and we're like, What the fuck are we going to do here now? And so we back Everything I'm doing next Monday, and we call Nicole Brighton, who was really David warmers first choice to give him credit. But we were like this other TV accurate. You put this in the black right away. So we of course we want her that long story short. We got Nicole come out. She got three hours to rehearse with David Marmor. That was it. And then back to Friday, we've moved everything a week from Monday back to the burbs on Monday. And on the Friday sitting there, we still don't have Brian, we still don't have Miss Stanhope. I get a bunch of like, reels from like friends, like, Oh, here's an older actress you might like. So I watch Susan Davis, who was the mom in Wargames. I watched her reel. And there's a number at the end of it. And I call the number thinking it's gonna be basically you know, her agent or manager. And it's not. It's a it's her. And I'm like, horribly inappropriate, but I'm gonna pitch it a movie, and I'm gonna pitch us. And so we did. And she was like, Yes, I I've never done a cult review before. This sounds fantastic. At 930 in the morning, sign up by 1130. Fast forward to the end of the day. We're trying to sit there looking worried about the Brian character. We're trying to start on Monday, again, like I said, and finally get a call. We called our friends a Blumhouse. And they were in places like those who were helping the CIA's and the WM ease of the world. William Morris, stay open. And finally get a call, like 730 at night. And it's it's Gersh. And it's basically the guy gels Maddie who plays Brian? He says yes. And we're like, okay, you got it. We got him. I think we're going to start this movie, Well, why didn't you call us till now? He was driving down from San Francisco. And he had to pull over the side of the road and read the read the script on his phone. And he only read his part. And he just said yes. And I asked that Naomi, I was like, Is this what happens? And she was just like, Yeah, we just read our parts. Sometimes they make sure it's not a porn, or a snuff film. So that's how it works. But he said yes. So we were like over the moon. Anyway, that's when you make when you ask questions, like, Oh, would you be willing? It's like, I'm starving over here. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

One of my favorite interviews that we've done was Charlie Clauser, who did the music for the Saw movies. And, and he said something he said, Hey, if I'm breathing, I'm doing these some movies. Yeah, it was great. Yeah. Okay. Well, thank you again for joining us today.

Alok Mishra:

Hope that last story wasn't too much. I'm sorry.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, you're you're good. You're good. Thank you for joining us. Keep an eye out for the sequel to 1BR coming soon. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So check them out. Our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So check him out. You can find us on all the socials at Eye On Horror or at ihorror.com which is a site we all call home. And yes. Thanks again for joining us and we will see everybody again in two weeks. So for me James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison

Jonathan Correia:

and I'm Jonathan Correia.

Alok Mishra:

Alok Mishra

Naomi Grossman:

Naomi Grossman

James Jay Edwards:

your Eye On Horror

Welcome back!
Adult Swim Yule Log
Avatar: The Way of the Water
Christmas Action Movies
Awards Screeners
Violent Night
Margaux the Smart House
Lucky McKee's Old Man
Sagebrush Video Game
The Callisto Protocol
Welcome Alok Mishra and Naomi Grossman
Origin Stories
Producing 1BR
Netflix and Marketing
Pandemic Influence
Playing the System
Pandemic narrative
1BR on VOD
Love for Tubi
1BR Sequel??
Naomi and the Legacy of Pepper/AHS
Outros
Wait, One More Story From Alok
Actual Outros
Restless Spirit Goes Hard ASF