Eye On Horror

Welcome to the Hotel Full of Horror

September 26, 2022 iHorror Season 5 Episode 17
Welcome to the Hotel Full of Horror
Eye On Horror
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Eye On Horror
Welcome to the Hotel Full of Horror
Sep 26, 2022 Season 5 Episode 17
iHorror

This episode, the boys review Pearl, Barbarian, 1992's Mikey, talk about what famous families The Skarsgårds could take in a fight, and celebrate Scream Factory's Tenth anniversary. Then they go into their main topic talking about Horror locations of Hotels, Motels, Air BnBs, and rentals; talking some of their favorite titles, why these settings are inherently uneasy, and more on a new episode of Eye on Horror!

https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, the boys review Pearl, Barbarian, 1992's Mikey, talk about what famous families The Skarsgårds could take in a fight, and celebrate Scream Factory's Tenth anniversary. Then they go into their main topic talking about Horror locations of Hotels, Motels, Air BnBs, and rentals; talking some of their favorite titles, why these settings are inherently uneasy, and more on a new episode of Eye on Horror!

https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror

Follow us on the socials: @EyeOnHorror or check out https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror
Get more horror movie news at: https://ihorror.com

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com This is episode 95 Otherwise known as season five, Episode 17. I'm your host James Jay Edwards and With me as always is your other host Jacob Davison, how you doing Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

I'm doing quite well I had a very blessed day which I will be going into once we get to the main conversation

James Jay Edwards:

blessing or anti blessing

Jacob Davidson:

angels to some demons to others.

James Jay Edwards:

Good call. Also with us yet again as always is your other other host Jon Correia How you doing today? Korea?

Jonathan Correia:

I'm doing all right. Am I sticking my neck right now because I fell asleep on the couch watching M*A*S*H in a weird position and now my neck is all messed up. And you know, now that I said that out loud, I realized I have I've become my father. I became I became Joe I'm gonna go have an existential crisis on the corner for a little bit. Excuse me guys.

James Jay Edwards:

Did you have dreams of Radar's bear butt

Jonathan Correia:

no, but I did watch the tub episode where he where he's like, you gotta leave right and hug guys like yeah, and then he doesn't he's like, What does that even negative? Like you said you wouldn't be gotten really is like one of the greatest shows ever. I'm on season seven now. And it just dude when they brought back up the death of the colonel

James Jay Edwards:

Henry Blake. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. When radar was like when they're like what are you gonna remember after this? He's like one very terrible day I was like, No, don't make me relive this shit.

James Jay Edwards:

That is I remember watching that that's speaking of being old. I remember watching that when it was like first broadcast and I was like, holy crap did somebody died because it was unheard of in TV. You know back then that they would kill a main character even if they were leaving the show. They didn't kill them. You know, so Oh, as as tears tears. What's been going on this week? I know there's something I think all three is. All three of us have seen it the big release this week as Pearl you guys Oh, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I did not. It was it was either Pearl or Moonage Daydream and IMAX and I'm sorry, Bowie's gonna always win. That that play.

James Jay Edwards:

Pearl is I mean, I haven't seen Moon as J dream. So I don't I can't actually say whether Pearl. It's really good. You have to see Perl on a big screen. And I'll tell you why. It has a completely different vibe from X. I mean, it's still clearly like a proto slasher. But it is it's more of instead of being a tribute to like those 70s Grindhouse movies like X was it's a tribute to like classic Hollywood. I mean, it's Technicolor brightness, it's almost and there's more than just the Technicolor that parallels to the Wizard of Oz there's like all sorts of Wizard of Oz shit and it you know, bright reds and blues and yellows and it's you know, kind of Gone with the Windy and oh, it's it's a beautifully made movie, Mia Goth walks the line between, like, complete clowny melodrama, and like Oscar winning performance. She's She's brilliant for, for who the character is. There's one monologue in particular, where you're like almost in tears watching her. And then you get to the final shot in the movie where it's basically it's, it's this uncomfortably long shot of her face smiling and you can i It might even be in the trailer, you can see the shot all over the place. And that's what the closing credits go over. So she holds this face for like, probably seven or eight minutes. And it's like, and it's it's just so campy. But oh, yeah, Pearl is terrific.

Jacob Davidson:

Ya know, I was fortunate enough to be at the pre screening they were doing at the new Beverly with Ty West. And it was a double feature with X, which I had previously seen back in March. And it was, it was interesting seeing it in that format, because it works either way. You could see X then Pearl, or you can see Pearl than X it works both ways. And yeah, no, I totally agree, though, that the movie is itself, just kind of one big throwback to the Golden Age of Hollywood and kind of those picture shows. Because it said in 1918 And yeah, like and the whole theme in the movie is that Pearl wants to escape. So she watches lots of movies and she sees like all these kinds of classical, mostly dancer music centric films and

James Jay Edwards:

she doesn't watch movies she watch his pictures all right, right she goes to the pictures.

Jacob Davidson:

Just go into the picture show.

Jonathan Correia:

Have you guys heard about this new thing? It's called moving pictures. I swear to God the train was coming right at me.

Jacob Davidson:

Pretty much. Yeah, and I and I do think it's interesting how it kind of threads the needle from that era into kind of more modern horror psychological horror because this this feels like if RKO Pictures had made a slasher movie in the in the 20s or something. It just get a tie. You know, it's like similar with how x was a throwback. This is a throwback that blends in the horror.

James Jay Edwards:

It's a throw not quite as far back as it set like x is a throwback to the 70s it's set in the 70s this is a throwback to about 20 years after it's set, I guess but it's a beautifully made movie it is I mean that the the way that it shot the way that it's acted the way that it's scored it I mean it's and it's a big screener, you should see it don't don't wait for for video on it. It's a it's a big screener. It's it's weird because it's like yeah, sure it pays tribute to like Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind and all that stuff. But also, you'll see little nods to like Psycho and Carrie and there's even one scene that's a lot like a scene from Hereditary and your you know, it's it's he he wears his influences on his sleeve. Or not even maybe his influence is more like film history. It's almost like you can tell Ty West is a film scholar. He knows his cinematic history, because there's no way that everything in this movie is an accident. There's no way

Jacob Davidson:

oh no doubt. As for me, like I said I went to Sunday Mass today and the sense that for the 35th anniversary of Clive Barker's Hellraiser, the American Cinematheque arrow theater did a double feature of the original Hellraiser with

Hellbound:

Hellraiser 2 both on 35 millimeter. And it was one of the best word viewing experiences I think I've ever had, just because, well, I mean, if you've seen Hellraiser and Hellraiser II, you know, that, like the second the sequel starts off exactly where the first Hellraiser ends. So, it's basically just watching one big movie, and both were beautiful 35 millimeter prints.

James Jay Edwards:

And those are the two good ones. No razor fringe,

Jacob Davidson:

pretty much pretty much and funnily enough, they actually had Peter Atkins, the writer of hell Hellbound: Hellraiser 2 their to kind of talk about the production history because even talked a bit about a Hellraiser 3: Hell on Earth and Hellraiser Bloodlines and the difficulties they're in that went into those productions. But yeah, on on Hellraiser and Hellraiser 2 it. It is funny, though, watching where the franchise started, and where it turned into, because, you know, the biggest thing of all is that pin in and the Cenobites don't really play that big a role in the first film, then, you know, the later sequels had, you know, like, pinhead is basically there for like five minutes. And the focus is on Frank and Julia Khan, who are the real villains of the first couple movies, which I feel is just such an encapsulation of Clive Barker's themes that there are monsters, but then there are humans that are worse than monsters.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, no, that's, that's every Clive Barker story down to a tee, which is great.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And also, I do have to give a big shout out to Claire Higgins, who played Julia Khan, because like that is one of the best villain performances, in my opinion, because especially the evolution because in the first movie, she's like, this housewife that capitulates to Frank to help him get blood, and then she starts to get real into it in every way, like the sex the violence, and then she comes back and help out Hellraiser too. And she becomes Hell's girl boss and starts, like, showing her charisma. And you know, she manipulates Dr. canards, and I just really wish that she had stuck with the franchise and come back for the third movies like they had originally planned

Jonathan Correia:

that I think that's gonna be my next franchise because I know I just did Chucky and Children of the Corn but I think Hellraiser in its sequels, because I've only really seen the first two I think I tried watching third one once and fell asleep and then just haven't gotten back to it. So I think it's a it's about time I solve the puzzle box and go for it. Well, for me, this week was the beginning of HoopTober is those of you know, there's the annual 31 days and 31 movies and 31 days, where Cinemamonster on letterbox picks out categories and it's you Usually stuff like six, six moves from six decades or a different countries stuff like that. And then he'll throw in a few randos in there. And as always, there has to be a Toby Hooper movie because you know, it's who Tober Of course, so I made my list a few weeks ago and you can start on the 15th especially if you got a busy schedule and can't watch movie every day in October. So I started on the 15th and I went, I've been going hard I'm about think letterbox says I'm 15% of the way through my list already. Yeah, so just and I gotta say, you taking a few opportunities as always to watch movies that I own but haven't watched. So for my for my two Christopher Lee Movies. I'm watching the two final performances as Dracula with Dracula A.D. 1972 and The Satanic Rites of Dracula, which I watch A.D. 1972 The other day, what a fun movie.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I really dig that one. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

I know. We got lambasted with the critics back in the day. But it's, it's it's it's a historical piece now, you know, like how, how they used to be historical pieces, but now it's been so long that it's a time capsule of the 70s It's real fun. But I have to say the highlight of my week so far, has been 1993's or 1992's Mikey, Do you guys remember that one? Oh, yeah, I

Jacob Davidson:

know Mikey, the killer kid movie.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, so I know we did an episode on killer kids a while ago but I had never seen Mikey and my goodness Mikey was a lot of fun. Speaking of Hellraiser, Ashley Lawrence plays the teacher in it. Oh, no. Sure. Yeah. And she's real good. And Mikey kills her with a slingshot. Which was really fun. Oh, spoiler. Sorry.

James Jay Edwards:

And that's the best way for a killer kid to strike.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, like real Dennis the Menace?

Jonathan Correia:

Let me let me tell you something. This movie is Dennis the Menace meets The Good Son, like in the best ways possible. And one of the fun things about it too. Is it stars? It stars Brian Bansal who was Family Ties he was he was in Family Ties. But for me and my childhood, he was the kid and Blank Check. Which was the movie of course of the kid who cashes like a check. And they give him like, way too much money. So he just spends it. And that movie always had like a really weird like, kind of romance thing with him and an adult woman and I was very uncomfortable, especially as an adult will look back I'm like, why the fuck would they make this? Guess what? He did it? He did it before in Mikey he was having like, hey, like he fixated his like because the whole thing is like, Oh, you have to love me unconditionally and fixates on like the his friend next door is older sister, but at least in this movie, she's a teenager so it's like not as many years apart but Blank Check was really weird because he was like 12 And she was like 30 Something

James Jay Edwards:

Hear me out. Mikey meets Esther from Orphan.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. No,

Jonathan Correia:

actually it's pretty funny because there's there's a lot of similarities in the stories between Mikey and Orphan because Mikey is adopted into a family and he's got like a shady past because

James Jay Edwards:

he's not, though is it? No, no,

Jonathan Correia:

no, I this one, he's actually a kid. But there's, there's a great kills. There's some great dialogue, especially when he does kill Ashley Lawrence. It's great because she's Mikey's teacher. And she's like, he's Mike. He's like, you know, I Oh, you are a great teacher. I always liked you. But there's one more thing you can teach me and she's like, What Mikey, and he just goes, how to die. And it pulls out the slingshot as it slowmos, like the ball coming at the camera then hits her in the face.

Jacob Davidson:

So so she just dies from like, it's not even like a rock. It's just a ball.

Jonathan Correia:

They show it later. It's like a big metal marble. They show her body later and it's like lodged in her face. So like I had had some old dude, I think it's like eight people and one cat that he kills. Oh man. Yeah, he goes Mikey goes hard dude. Like he had some great one liners like it was it was a lot. It was a fun movie. I highly recommend it MVD put out a great blu ray for it.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you guys seen that new movie on Shudder? Speak No Evil.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, I actually saw that. Several months ago at Sundance.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, did you watch it Correia?

Jonathan Correia:

The only the only new movies I saw is one we're going to discuss later and Moonage Dream.

James Jay Edwards:

Speak no evil is like it's a really uncomfortable movie. It's um, it reminds you it has like Funny Games vibes to it. You know, it's it's, it's about this. Let me see if I can get this right. It's about Danish couple who goes and visits a Dutch couple. Yeah, yeah, that's it because they're in Denmark and the Dutch couples in Holland. So they meet them on vacation and then they invite them over and they don't even know these people but they go visit them and like it Shit happens. I don't even want to like get into the shit that happens but it's just really uncomfortable. really disturbing it. It left me feeling at the end the way I felt at the end of watching Compliance. Which speak no evil is probably more of a horror movie than Compliance. You know, it's more of a traditional you know, it's actually a horror movie Compliance is question Probably a horror movie. It's

Jacob Davidson:

more psychological.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, it's just disturbing as fuck, but Speak No Evil is just one of those. I mean, just some of the shit that happens. And yeah, it's one of those like, you're on the escalator. And you're like, No, no, no, let's turn around. Let's turn it.

Jacob Davidson:

And to be honest, I didn't know I didn't really like it that much. I mean, yeah, I mean, if I was good, and I thought it did an excellent job and, you know, raising the tension and creating, you know, the social anxiety situations, but I just feel like the premise or thesis didn't didn't really have as much a payoff. And some of the characters weren't really that well developed. So I didn't really feel as strongly about what happened. So, I mean, it was okay. I just didn't figure it was that great,

James Jay Edwards:

right? I just, it's one of those. I mean, I agree with pretty much everything you said, you know, the characters are kind of vague and places. I just think that it it is. Yeah, the payoff is a little anticlimactic, I should say. Yeah. But it just the whole thing. It's, it just goes places like the last act goes places where you're just like, No, no, let's not go here. It's yeah, it's just really disturbing.

Jonathan Correia:

Wait, wait one second. I just realized something. I watched a movie after we recorded our last episode, and I need to mention it. I'm sorry if I'm cutting anyone out. Oh, no. Go ahead. Go ahead. Have you guys heard of Full Eclipse?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh shit. I love Full Eclipse.

Jonathan Correia:

I bought it on VHS forever ago, I finally watched Okay, fully clips. It's from Anthony Hickox, who did Hellraiser three is one of the reasons why bring it up. I

Jacob Davidson:

And he did Waxwork 1 & 2

Jonathan Correia:

he did Waxwork he did Sundown, Yeah, and, and Jill the Ripper which I also watched on VHS that same day, it was a it was a double feature I did on my own. Mario van Peebles plays a good cop and he gets kind of recruited into this like secret unit of cops. And it turns out they're all like juicing up with like, werewolf serum or whatever. So so they turn into like super werewolf cops. And like, it's the dumbest premise, and it's executed perfectly.

James Jay Edwards:

Is this a VynSin movie? It's it needs to be I was gonna say it sounds it sounds like something they put out. Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, it was an HBO TV movie. So it hasn't really gotten a wide release since but it's

Jonathan Correia:

from like 1993 If you can find a copy of it on VHS or DVD it is worth the it's got everything it's got it's just one

James Jay Edwards:

Justin if you're listening to this.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, no, he's the one that recommended it. Oh. So when that put it on my radar. Yeah, dude. It's got everything it's got wannabe John Woo. jumping through the air slow mo gun action. It's got a terrible like crazy, like gangs that are getting torn apart by X Men like werewolves

James Jay Edwards:

are the werewolves? The cops? Yeah. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

they're souping up because they got to take the law into their own hands because LA is too crazy. It's like it's like a great companion to Predator 2. You know? Yeah. It's, I cannot recommend this movie. Not like it did not deserve to be as good as it was like it really I was really expecting it to be like, Oh, this is gonna be really cheesy. I was like, holy shit is actually really solid.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and it's funny. You mentioned X Men because apparently it was a major influence on Anthony Hickox when he was making the movie because he couldn't get the rights the X Men so he decided you know, and superhero horror werewolf cop movie?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, what if I had made Wolverine a bunch of cops? And of course, Mario van Peebles, you know he is he's always an agenda watch especially when he's in bad movies like he's always the best part like what was it Universal Soldier 2 the return and terrible movie but he was very interesting to watch because he was like a program. Like why? Anyways, that was my ADHD moment of holy shit I need to mention

Jacob Davidson:

spoofy Yeah, and also putting it out into the universe somebody for the love of God get the rights of Full Eclipse and put it on Blu ray or 4k or whatever you can for K please. 4k Full Moon full Eclipse. And speaking of home video, today is the 10th anniversary of one of the most popular genre labels out there Scream Factory.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah 10 years. Like I think they I think they said on the thing over 650 titles they put 150

James Jay Edwards:

is what they said. Yeah, that's that's a lot.

Jonathan Correia:

I own about half maybe.

James Jay Edwards:

I think we've all been collecting Scream Factory probably since the beginning. What were your guys's first screen factory titles? I

Jacob Davidson:

actually got a bit of a story with mine. I was at rockin shock 2012 Is the horror rock'n'roll convention in Worcester, Massachusetts. And it was the first time I think they were kind of establishing themselves so they were doing like drawings for free copies of Halloween 2 and Halloween 2 since it was their first releases and I just so happened

to win a copy of Halloween 3:

Season of the Which,

James Jay Edwards:

of course you won something.

Jacob Davidson:

It's just it's just my lifestyle. I just, I just go to places and they give me free stuff.

Jonathan Correia:

Listen, I don't believe in the luck of the Irish anymore. It's the it's the luck of the Davison. Yeah, it's gotta be

Jacob Davidson:

It's good stuff. But yeah, I got the I got the copy of Halloween three seasons of the witch. And, you know, and especially at that time, I thought it was a pretty well put together release because you know, a lot of the stuff put out by like the studios were pretty basic. You know, you got the movie, get maybe an interview trailer. These enough, okay. But Scream Factory went all out, you know, Halloween, three seasons of which you had, like a new restoration, you had interviews with Tom Atkins, and a whole bunch of people involved commentary, set, set location visits, all kinds of stuff. And I was just like, oh, wow, what are they gonna put out next? And the rest is history.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, mine was also Halloween three. And it was when those were the only two that were out. And the thing was for me, Halloween three. In my opinion, there had never been a decent release of it. Um, Halloween two, I had already had a DVD of it that I thought was, you know, pretty cool. But Halloween three. I was like, Okay, no, this is this is the first time I've seen a release worthy of it. So yeah, I went ahead and bid that. And then when they did the whole Halloween set, I ended up with all of them. Yeah. What are you Korea? What was your first screen factory?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, man. My first was They Live

Jacob Davidson:

nice,

Jonathan Correia:

I remember getting it and it had the sticker on it. That's it that had the buy. And, and like, I think that that was that that was about the time where I became like a collector collector, because like, I had been collecting DVDs and blu rays for a few years. But like, that's when I was like, really starting to get into like, Alright, I'm buying a lot of these and buying them for this special edition. But I have to say, I think, you know, they've put out so many great titles, and they keep re releasing them and like putting out the new the newest restorations and stuff. But like the one that like really stuck out for me was Phantom of the Paradise like, oh, yeah, that like, mostly just because like that was one that like I never saw a copy of it anywhere in small town woods of New Hampshire. And so when I found my DVD copy of it randomly one day, like I was so stoked, and I was lending it out to everybody so that DVD and that case was so worn out just from being lent out to everybody over the years. So to have like a brand new, great looking blu ray of it was just,

James Jay Edwards:

that was actually going to be my next question. What is your favorite release they've done and mine. It's obvious to anybody who's listened to my voice over the last however long we're doing doing this five years Alone in the Dark is mine just because it was it was a holy grail moment for me when they when they put that out. So yeah. What about you, Jacob?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, you know, that is a tough question.

James Jay Edwards:

There are so many to choose from.

Jacob Davidson:

But yeah, I do feel like some of the favorites are the stuff that do feel like a holy grail or like an impossibility made real. Which is why say one of my favorites is the 4k UHD release of Alligators starring Robert Forster. Because, you know, for the longest time, nobody thought that would ever get a release. And lo and behold, they come in with a 4k release. And it just kind of blew people away. And most recently, they actually put out a Blu ray of Seward, Gordon's Space Truckers. Yeah. Which, yeah, which was a childhood favorite of mine. I used to watch all the time on the Sci Fi Channel. And I dream for years have a proper High Definition home video release video, because like I had this really old and crappy DVD pan and scan of it from like, 2007. So it just wasn't cutting it anymore. And, you know, that's the thing I love about them that they do these kinds of restorations and help these movies, find new audiences and you know, stay preserved so that people can watch them. So

James Jay Edwards:

I felt the same way about the Town That Dreaded Sundown when they did it. Oh, yeah. Why? I mean, I mean, I love that they did X I love that movie, but I'm like, What made them think to release the Town That Dreaded Sundown and make it look this good? Because it really has no business looking back at that. That would be like cleaning up the Legend of Boggy Creek, which someone else did. But it looks

Jonathan Correia:

incredible. I can't wait for that 4K

James Jay Edwards:

another thing that I saw this past week. That will be out by the time this this posts is Don't Worry, Darling. Are you guys familiar with this? Who I'm familiar with this?

Jacob Davidson:

Have you seen it? No, not Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

There's actually been a lot of behind the scenes drama because I guess Olivia Wilde who directed and I loved booksmart her first movie. This one's more psychological drama. I wouldn't really call iHorror But it's psychological drama. booksmart was flat up comedy. But I guess she fired Sheila Boo from it. And then Florence Pugh who is the female lead, won't do any promotion or is doing very little promotion for the movie. So there's all this behind the scenes.

Jonathan Correia:

I feel like a lot of that behind the scenes drama, though, is just internet speculation. It could be I feel like especially like the Lord's Florence pew thing, it just feels like people are like, Oh, she's not there, there must be some drama going on. Like they, they did a whole thing that like Harry Styles spit on Chris Pine, and it was like, debunked the next day. And it's like, Guys, you're reaching and grabbing. And just let it be.

James Jay Edwards:

It's funny, because the setup, here are my feelings. It's a tale of two halves. The setup and like the first half, is really intriguing. You're sitting there going, basically what it's about is about this 50s Col de sac development, like this housing project where all these people live. And every day the men leave and go to work. And the women take ballet classes and go shopping or sit around and you know, at the pool kind of thing. And then the men come home at night and then you know, they end that's how they live their lives. And all the men work at this place called the victory project. So it's like a housing development for the people who work at this place. And things start happening that make you kind of think, Okay, this is this place is not on the level. And this the setup is brilliant. And then, like we were talking about with the Geare Brothers taking the hard turn, it's not the movie you think it is. And you know, it's the whole time you're waiting for the other shoe to drop. You're like oh, okay, no, this is not, you know, there's going to be some Shama launch shit going on, you know, in this movie at some point, and there is, you know, it's not at what everything seems. But I don't want to spoil what it is, you know what, what the actual deal with the town is, but it it as the mystery unravels. The whole movie kind of unravels, as well, it just kind of doesn't really, it doesn't really solve the mystery as well as it should. Florence Pugh is amazing in it. And also surprisingly, Harry Styles is amazing at it, too. Which is weird, because he's like a pop star. And you know, that's like saying Justin Bieber's gonna be amazing. And, you know, when he acts in this thing, hey,

Jonathan Correia:

he, he was great in that episode of CSI that he was in.

Jacob Davidson:

Remember that? Oh, yeah. When he gets just shot up with like, 1000 bullets.

James Jay Edwards:

Harry style, and he does kind of turn into Harry Styles, because there's this long prolonged dance scene that he does where he actually, the dude's got moves. But um, you know, it's a, it's a well made movie. I mean, I think she's a competent director. I think that the issue might be with the writing on this one, because it just doesn't. Yeah, it didn't quite stick the landing for me. But it's, it's an intriguing premise, and it's actually an intriguing movie we're seeing in theaters. You could probably wait for VOD unless, you know, you have nothing else to see in theaters and you want to go and speaking of hard turns. Another thing that Korea and I also saw this week, which Jacob has seen, and it's going to lead us into our topic, Barbarian.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, buddy.

Jonathan Correia:

Now we're gonna say this right now, we are not spoiling anything about this movie that hasn't been in the trailer, you need to go into this thing as blind as possible.

James Jay Edwards:

Yes, absolutely. And that's the thing. If you have not seen barbarian, we're going to be pretty vague about things. So you don't really have to worry about listening to us talk about it. But please try to learn as little as possible. I mean, even looking at the cast list, IMDb, you're going to it might raise some flags. So yeah, it's but it is. I'll just say one thing. Whatever movie you're expecting out of Barbarian? It's not that movie. It is something completely different. And it doesn't quite take as many hard turns as Retaliators but pretty damn close.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, now that's the thing I really love about barbarian in that it's a it's a movie in disguise in a way like you go in with an expectation for something and what you get is not what you'd expect

James Jay Edwards:

it Yeah, absolutely. And it is yeah, it I mean we can't even really talk about it very much, you know, but yeah, it's it's it's definitely the surprised movie of the year. I mean, in more ways than one

Jonathan Correia:

ya know, Barbarian is is so well done. And the thing about it is I like to say movies like this they have a lot of confidence like the movie has fucking balls for pull for even just attempting the stuff that pulls off the tonal change

James Jay Edwards:

even if you think it doesn't pull off that tone change it doesn't give a fuck what you think it's like we're doing this Yeah, you're right. I mean confident is the perfect way to describe Barbarian

Jonathan Correia:

it is it is confident in mixing genres. It's confident in its in what it what it needs to do, because it does it It's not linear. It's not you know, and when it when it makes these sudden jumps, it's very jarring. But it doesn't. It doesn't care what you think it is what it feels like. It's like, no, I need to do this. Oh, we're in the middle of this now I need to do this now. And it's

James Jay Edwards:

like what you're not keeping up with try harder. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

And it's very effective in that way. Like, is there there are parts where I laughed my ass off and there are parts where and you know, this hasn't happened a long time. I screamed and jumped in my seat.

Jonathan Correia:

It was a great one to see with a crowd even if the crowd at AMCs suck. But it Yeah, it's it's definitely one, please go in as blind as possible. See what some people wear your mask when you go and enjoy because it's going to it's going to slap you in the face so many times and you're not going to know what's going on. What's what's next. It's great.

James Jay Edwards:

And basically, you know, what you see in the trailer is essentially, this girl shows up in Airbnb and it's been double booked. And there's already somebody there. Which is going to lead us into our topic.

Jonathan Correia:

Actually real quick. Who is it? Bill? Skarsgard? Bill Skarsgard Yes, first guard. So like just all the Skarsgard are just like hot like like we like we knew this but like god damn was that boy charming in the in that movie. Like I was just like, Damn, dude, the Skarsgards fuck, like,

James Jay Edwards:

but he's, he's charming. But he's also intentionally Miss He is the least developed character. And now we're starting to like spoil. So we don't want to talk too much. But like, He's the least developed character in the movie.

Jonathan Correia:

And I didn't care. I was lost in those eyes the whole time.

James Jay Edwards:

But the thing is, I think that's on purpose. Because they want you to be suspicious of him. Yeah. And there's a reason and we can't talk. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Hey, man, I just I just paused for a moment to say that Bill Skarsgard and the rest of the Skarsgards could get it. No need to suddenly go into spoiler territory here. Bud,

James Jay Edwards:

but let's go basically what we're talking about Airbnbs and hotels and hostels. And any place where you stay temporarily. This is we're checking into the horror hotel. And let's start off with this. Because I have my answer. I want to ask you guys, what do you guys think is the first horror hotel movie?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, the first one that comes to mind of course would be Psycho.

James Jay Edwards:

That's my answer psycho because it's got basically everything you know, it's got the crazy owner, it's got the voyeurism. It's basically anything that you think of that can happen when you're in an environment under someone else's control happens. So I feel like there's

Jonathan Correia:

there's there's got to be movies before Psycho that are that take place at a hotel or motel or something where

James Jay Edwards:

you're gonna go back to The Old Dark House, aren't you? That was no Korea.

Jonathan Correia:

I wasn't gonna go there. But like, I'm trying to I'm like, there's, there's, there's got to be because before we started listing off movies, I just want to talk a little bit about like, why, like, what is it like about hotels, or just like places that you go to stay at that inherently have that. And I and I was trying to I that was one of the things I was like kind of getting my brain going when we came up with this topic all week. And, for me, at least, I feel like it's, it's that hyper awareness because you're essentially, in a place that's supposed to be your home away from home. So there so you have that, like false sense of security, but also because it's not your home. There's this like, other worldly like thing in the back of your mind, where it's always just like, there's something wrong with there, whether it's like you're looking for bedbugs or cockroaches, or like, you know, the mini fridge doesn't work, you know, you're always looking for something wrong. And not only that, but like you're you're in usually in a space where there's a lot of people going out, you know, it could be outside your door at any time. And there's like no control over it. So there's just like something inherently with these these type of environments where it's just like uneasiness. You know,

James Jay Edwards:

that's what I was gonna say. I already alluded to it earlier. I think it's the fact that you're in a space that you're supposed to use, like, as you said, a home away from home, but it's someone else's. It's someone else's in control of it.

Jonathan Correia:

Someone else has the key.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, someoneelse has the key someone else could be peeking through the wall. Someone else could have a camera up there. Someone else could be hiding under the bed. You know, someone else could you know, there could be a trapdoor under the bed and they can just come into your room you know, it's it's not being in complete control like you would if it was your house?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I think it's it really boils down to trusts or you know, fear trust, because you are trusting the caretaker whoever to put you up for the night and you don't know this person. You just met this person probably. So you just have to trust that this person. Is this going to lie to you? Stay at this place for a night or whatever, and they're not going to kill you. Hopefully. And also going back to what Korea was saying, I actually did think of like a real life instance of hotels. Hotel of horror. Well before psycho, because there was that serial killer HH Holmes, who had his own horror hotel where he would lure victims.

James Jay Edwards:

Was that actually a hotel though? Or was that just his house that he would lure people into that had

Jonathan Correia:

knows it was a home it was a hotel that he built at the World's Fair the World's

James Jay Edwards:

Fair You're right. Yes. Yeah, it was built to house people go into the world for your right yes, it wasn't Hotel.

Jonathan Correia:

HH Holmes has like a long history of doing like really weird and fucked up shit. But like, of course his magnum opus was the things also he's from New Hampshire. So you know, shout out to that. I always say New Hampshire we're known for Adam Sandler and HH Holmes but

Jacob Davidson:

take your pick.

Jonathan Correia:

He got caught for stealing a horse that's that's what didn't read he got he got executed for that but anyways, but But yeah, and it's and it's not only that, but we also know like we don't know what else has gone on in that hotel room because we all know like hotel rooms you know that's where people go to make with their you know, their cheating partners or never shine a black light. Yeah, there's always night inheritance with it. So yeah, and then it's so yeah, I mean, it's yeah, and then like then you get into like the more specifics where it's like Airbnb is it's creepier because you are in somebody else's house. You it's not like a place that goes by that is like really relegated by government agencies or anything and then you have hostels where it's, it's the same thing, but you're sharing it with a bunch of strangers. You don't know what those strangers do. I've had some really weird hostel. Nights boy in mind in

James Jay Edwards:

a hostel is like a dormitory where you know, it's like you're literally in a room with a stranger. With no with 15 others. Yeah, well, yeah, but with strangers. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah. It's weird. But yeah, so Well, what are some of your guys's favorite? Do we want to be specific we want to stick to like, do we want to do it? Like, what's your what's your, what's your favorite motel? Or?

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, okay. Um, well, the first one that came to mind and I've been very excited to talk about is of course, motel hell, you bastard. You

Jonathan Correia:

beat me to it.

Jacob Davidson:

I know. I'm sorry. It's just it's such a fun movie. And so like it was very ahead of its time in terms of being kind of a horror comedy because it's sort of a riff on like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and Psycho and a bunch of stuff. Because, yeah, you got farmer Vinson and his motel Hello, who sets up these traps for guests and just kind of people in the vicinity so that he can make his famous you know, as the tagline says, it takes all kinds of critters to make farmer Vitsin fritters and yeah, you know, it's so it's definitely on the goofier side of things but it does have kind of a style to it because it's like this like moralistic farmer and his kind of Igor ish asst who are like luring people in so that they can make these famous foodstuffs. And it's and yeah, it's it's like a little old shack, motel out in the in the wilds of the highway and, and also just does have the unique feature because they got that farm, where they like plant the people up to their necks and like rip out their vocal cords. Like gurgle is really disturbing. Also, motel Hell has the pig head chainsaw flight, which I've is just such a badass horror sequence.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm not sure if I understand the difference between a motel and a hotel.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, honestly, I don't really know either. I just assumed that a hotel is bigger than a motel like yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

it's motels are generally like single storey or maybe even just two storey and they're more like they're more driver. Friendly.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Okay, so

James Jay Edwards:

What does that movie with? Is it is it it's just vacancy that actually I just watched that and it's not Oh, Owen Wilson. That's is it called Vacancy vacancy? Luke, Luke Wilson. Luke Wilson. Okay. My other choice was Patrick to me, Dan Wilson's talk about scars. We need to have a fight between the Wilsons and the scar. Scars marks. When are you?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, I mean, they they're built for they do they do way more action movies.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, did you see The Northman? Yeah, like wasn't Skarsgard can take all three Skarsgard could take down all the Wilsons and Bill and the father could just be hanging out in the back just like, you know, making weird eyes at them, you know.

James Jay Edwards:

Anyway, Vacancy it's one of those ones like I was talking about you don't know where the kids Hammer, you know, basically the gist of the movie and it's like 20 years old at this point. So I'm going to spoil a little part of it. The people on hotel make snuff films. And there's cameras in that peek into the rooms. So that's another one of those things where it's like, you know, you don't know who's watching when you're in these places, you know,

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, I just watched Vacancy as a part of my HoopTober. And I love the premise and I loved a lot of the movie. I think it suffers from casting though. I think that that Luke Wilson came back and so was pretty good at it. But I think Luke Wilson was just like, kind of miscast it. And it's it was it was a bit rough. And I heard there was a lot of like, behind the scenes, like they didn't really have much chemistry. And there's a lot of behind the scenes drama between the two. But like, just the basic premise. I like I was reading about the writer, and he said that he saw like, a motel and it was like super rundown. But it was still openings, like how are they making money and like that was like the inspiration for it was just thinking, Oh, well, they gotta be doing something seedy, like, maybe making snuff films in there. And they show the snuff films that they made for the movie. They're fake, but like, those were the most horrifying parts. It was just like, wow, they went really went for it with it. So it's a decent movie. I just, I just wish they had different actors, you know? I feel like feel like someone has to mention for hotels, at least The Shining and Doctor sleep, right? Like someone just really, but someone has to at some point mentioned it. So that one's interesting because it's one where it's empty as fuck. Like, we never really see the hotel open. Except for like, maybe the opening of The Shining, you know?

Jacob Davidson:

And even then, nothing really crazy happens.

James Jay Edwards:

And everybody's moving out. So it's still not in full swing. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

but man what glass? I mean, we've raved about the shine. That's what was one of the reasons like as much as we all know, shining Doctor sleep, you know, next level shit right there.

James Jay Edwards:

One where that I know that you guys both brought up as well. That we're the hotel is basically just the setting. It doesn't really revolve around the hotel all but Identity. Oh, yeah. basically kind of like a Shaolin thriller that just happens to take place at a hotel. I guess that would be a motel wouldn't

Jacob Davidson:

it? Yeah, but Identity. Yeah, I feel like it got its do not too long ago. It's kind of I feel like it's more of a cult movie nowadays. But it is a fascinating premise, just because it's like, you know, you got all these random people ending up in this motel on a dark and stormy night. And some as somebody is bumping them off one by one.

James Jay Edwards:

And also you realize they all have stuff in common. Yeah. So you're like, Okay, this isn't random. These aren't 12 random people, or was it 12 or eight or I don't even remember? Yeah. If I stopped to count them. I probably could. But yeah, there's also what a cast in that too. You know, John Q sack, Ray Liotta Alfred Molina. Yeah, yeah. Oh, who is? Who's the girl that I'm picturing her face, Amanda Peet? Yes, I almost said Amanda Seyfried. And I'm like, No, it's not her. Yeah. Nana Pete.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And back on Stephen King. You know, it feels like he definitely drew a lot from hotels and motels being horror, because I'm sure he used it on a couple other stories. But the in terms of the other big film adaptation, there's 1408

Jonathan Correia:

I still haven't seen that one.

James Jay Edwards:

Is it? 1408 or 1408? I'm really asking. I don't know I've always said 1408. But isn't 1408

Jacob Davidson:

You know, it's been a long time since I've seen it. I don't remember how they pronounced it's

Jonathan Correia:

like we're back in the 70s debating how to pronounce 2001 A Space Odyssey is it? Is it 21

James Jay Edwards:

There's a scene in Honk For Jesus Save Your Soul where they get into an argument over whether it's Amen or Amen. Anyway.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, well 1408 was called 1408 I felt like it's a pretty effective horror movie because you know, it's like, John Q sag specifically is looking for haunted hotels and stuff because he wants to he's like a skeptic wants to prove that there's no supernatural. And you know, Samuel Jackson's like the manager who very reluctantly gives him the room at the hotel. He specifically

James Jay Edwards:

wants to stay in that room and take no for an answer. And Samuel Jackson is like there's this expensive bottle of scotch or something that they're drinking and he's like, he's all you like the scotch. Oh, yeah, he's I'll keep the bottle just don't take the room.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, like he repeatedly warns him not to do it. But of course, he does it and all kinds of insane supernatural, like Euclidean crazy, crazy shit happens, you know? Like, he can't get out of the room and he starts seeing things and like ghosts and stuff start appearing to him. Well, he's,

James Jay Edwards:

he's like, he writes books, like like travel books of haunted hotels and stuff. But he is also kind of a professional debunker like, he doesn't believe in this stuff. It's just what he writes about. So he wants to write about this room but he doesn't believe any of the crap about it. But Samuel Jackson does.

Jacob Davidson:

Exactly and guess who was right. Yeah. Spoiler alert. mean in the trailer, you know, like in the like advertising they made it pretty plain.

James Jay Edwards:

Do you guys remember that movie from from the pandemic year? That IFC movie The Rental? Yeah. Oh, yeah. Another Airbnb where they find cameras in the showers and shit. It's like, that's,

Jonathan Correia:

that was great. That was the Dave Franco, director that right? Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah. Yeah. No, I thought that did a pretty good job of playing with the premise because, yeah, you know, it was like the whole thing like cameras and stuff and an air b&b or hotel. That type of horror, but the caretaker. Yeah. Creepy caretaker. And yeah, some of the drugs but I think it did a pretty good job of kind of putting those on its head and kind of keeping you guessing that one was

Jonathan Correia:

real saw that I was surprised by that pleasantly like, I didn't have any. When I say I was surprised, I never think something's going to be bad going into it. But that was it for how solid it was. I was like, Well, you know, it was real good. Another one that's really dope is William Friedkin's Bug, who

Jacob Davidson:

never saw that one. Oh, my God. Oh, Yo,

Jonathan Correia:

dude, it's Ashley Judd, Michael Shannon. And she plays like a waitress that's living in a rundown motel room. And she you know, she's suffering from trauma and alcohol alcoholism. And Michael Shannon is like a drifter. And like, they He's says that he's being watched by the government. And like, they both just kind of feed into each other's paranoia that like, like, the room is not only bugged by the government, but like that the that there's like, actual insect bugs in there that are part of it, too. And it gets like into some real gross body horror. Like, I feel like bug isn't talked about enough as like being really solid. Yeah, it

Jacob Davidson:

doesn't come up that much.

James Jay Edwards:

And by the end of this thing, they've got tinfoil up on every damn surface in this. I mean, it just gets they go hard. Yeah, it totally does. What about Bad Times at the El Royale? Do you guys remember? That's a fun one. That's, uh, I love that movie. I,

Jonathan Correia:

I always felt like I liked that movie more than everybody else. Like, like, I think we all did. I feel like a lot of people crapped on that movie, or were just like, it was all right. But like, I remember having a lot of fun with it.

James Jay Edwards:

I remember it was my number two movie of that year. I love that movie. I just, and again, you know, talking about, you know, being watched and cameras and stuff and, and that's just scratching the surface of all the fun shit that goes on at the

Jacob Davidson:

right. Yeah, and it also has what I love about a lot of these types of movies when they do you know, kind of like a full house, hotel or motel or whatever. And that it's like, intersecting characters, you know, like, it's an opportunity to just have a bunch of different characters with all kinds of different personalities and paths or whatever, meet up and interact and often collide in weird, scary or fun ways. And think bad times at the El Royale did a pretty good job of pulling that off, especially with the cast. You got like Jeff Bridges and Jon Hamm,

Jonathan Correia:

Chris Hemsworth,

James Jay Edwards:

Cynthia Erivo. Dakota Johnson. Oh, yeah, that's Dakota Johnson. hit and miss for me, depending on how she's cast. I think she's kind of limited on what she can play. But if you put her in the right role, she's great. And they put her in the right role in bad times. They'll right now. Okay, she's great in that. Korea, who do you think could win in a fight the Hemsworth brothers or the Skarsgard? Brother?

Jonathan Correia:

You know, it's tough. Skarsgard you know, I'm

James Jay Edwards:

gonna be on the Hemsworth

Jonathan Correia:

it's like, listen, it's just like Chris is you know, yeah, of course is a powerhouse but Luke, Luke, so Right.

James Jay Edwards:

That's the thing. You put four against the northmen. And then, and then just takes

Jonathan Correia:

care of the rest. Also, you have to remember there's like eight of the Skarsgard it's like there's a lot they might

James Jay Edwards:

be out numbered. Yeah. They got the numbers and the thing is, even if they're not really brothers, anyone with that last name could join and

Jonathan Correia:

basically yeah, I mean, like you also don't want to leave out the dad because the dead like yeah, I'm Come on. I would be remiss if we didn't talk about two of the best Italian horror movies that take place in American hotels with City of the Dead and The Beyond. Oh, yes. Yeah, talk about those two, two totally different movies, but I just wanted to throw them out there because they need to be brought up. The Beyond especially is just such a visually delicious movie with it takes place in New Orleans. Lucio Fulci directed and it follows a woman who inherits a haunted hotel, that might be the gateway to hell and boy do they show it like when they go into into the gates and stuff and like all the it's a faulty movie.

Jacob Davidson:

And it was also kind of, well, I guess Oh, massaging the shining because there's a particularly haunted room in that hotel. Because it also Yeah, ties in Have the plot that like the this painter named Shrek lived in the hotel until he was melted with acid by an angry mob because they thought his paintings were doorways to hell or something. Yeah. And yeah, no, I think it did a pretty good job of playing with the premise even though the hotel isn't really open for most of the movie, it's just kind of like the renovation is what's causing the terror like there is like even the opening scene, there's like a dude who's like painting a house, or he's painting the wall. And then he sees a ghost in the window and he falls and like, breaks his back and is having these visions.

Jonathan Correia:

It's so good. And the iconography with the white eyes and everything is so awesome. And then of course, city of the of the dead, is also really fucking great. You know, that's just beads into the classic like, history of witches in England, especially Massachusetts and whatnot. And yeah, either way, the beyond is fucking phenomenal. And if you ever get the chance because Fabio Fried's, he has been doing it a lot. If you get to see it with his live scoring, especially he's live rescoring. It's always always a blast. It's like a concert. It's a concert and in a screening of one of the most visually delicious movies out there, so

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, and I was gonna bring up, you know, back on Ty West, one of his other movies. The innkeepers. Did you guys see that one?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. No, it's on my hope. Tober list this year, though. Okay, so

Jacob Davidson:

all right. No spoilers but

James Jay Edwards:

it's slow burn. No,

Jacob Davidson:

it's extremely slow burn. It's

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, Ty West in general was pretty slow burn, but the innkeepers is like it makes HOUSE OF THE DEVIL look like you know, like, like, like a quick move and Max Fury Road. So that's something that's fast.

Jacob Davidson:

Like, but it's, it's a fun movie, and it's a New England horror movie because it's about these two staff members. Sarah, played by Sarah Perez, Sara Paxton and Pat Healy.

James Jay Edwards:

Who really my boy, yeah, the best when I saw him show up and Better Call Saul on that last season. I was like, Wait, that's not who that character was. They they changed actors. But I was cool with Pat Healy.

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, he got everything's improved with Pat Healy. But anyway, yeah, so it's basically these two people working at this allegedly haunted hotel called the Yankee peddler and and the hotel is getting shut down. So they decide that they want to document like an actual supernatural phenomenon at the hotel because nobody's ever captured evidence and stuff happens.

Jonathan Correia:

I was eyeballing you don't spoil from it. Ya know what's coming up.

James Jay Edwards:

We've run out of time here. But let's let's move from hotels and Airbnbs to Hostels. And, of course, the first two hostel movies were actually the second hostel movie. I don't think they actually stayed in a hostel but but I think the second one might be better than the first but anyway, hostel that, like Korea said, it's like they're dumping you into basically a dormitory. And these guys are all psyched because you know, their actual roommates are women. And you know, they're going to the sauna topless because there are they Czechoslovakia and or Russian, I think chuckles Avakian they're from somewhere else though. Where they're much you know, less modest. So these guys are like all psyched and of course, you know, if you haven't seen hospital by now, what are you doing with yourself but it comes at a cost?

Jonathan Correia:

Probably watching better movies

James Jay Edwards:

than awesome sorry, I'm

Jonathan Correia:

not a fan of HA so that's just Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

have you seen the second one? The second one I think is better the second one is the women that the victims are women but also it focuses on the on the killers to who you know bid and bought their victims so it's so it goes both it goes both ways.

Jacob Davidson:

Pancakes!

Jonathan Correia:

Does it feature some really stupid bits and then like with hostile with the bubble gum about kids being weird because like that was a young Eli Roth did a lot especially early in his career with like, Cabin Fever with that one kids it's like oh yeah, we're gonna convince these kids to commit murder by giving them a fuck ton a gum but I checked out

James Jay Edwards:

the bubble gum kids are in this as well but I don't know if this is going to convince you or not. Robin they kill one of them. Kill one of the kids one of the bubble gum kids gets killed. We were talking about killing kids.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Listen, just because I say I think movies need to go need to not be scared to go there doesn't mean I actively want to seek out movies that work kids died. I just want that to be know.

James Jay Edwards:

It's pretty fucked up. How they kill the kid too, though, but just you know, anyways, um, so yeah, that's let's let's end on killing kids. And

Jacob Davidson:

I will say though, I do like the title of the Hostel series for being a play on words because you know, hostile, hostile. Hostile. Hostile. Yeah. It's a it's a fun play on words.

James Jay Edwards:

I wonder if anybody thought that Christian Bale movie hostiles As part of the franchise, a predator predators daily in a way, the hostel

Jacob Davidson:

gets franchised hostels everywhere

Jonathan Correia:

I just want to give before we sign off a special shout out to Tower of Terror because I rewatched that recently. And for Disney movie that's pretty solid.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh yeah, I love that movie when I was a kid and it was an

James Jay Edwards:

awesome ride before they turned into Guardians of the Galaxy. Yeah. All right. Let's get the hell out. So yeah, these are these are our favorite hotel motel Airbnb and hospital movies. I'm sure we forgot some because let's face it, I always cut these guys off when they're in the middle of talking because I don't want to edit in the four hour episodes.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, we didn't even talk about psycho two, three, or four.

Jacob Davidson:

Or the remake? Let us

James Jay Edwards:

know what your favorites are. And if we miss if you think we missed any of our favorites, because we probably did. So yeah, let us know. Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So go check them out. Our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go check him out. You can check us out on any of the socials at Eye On Horror or@ihorror.com And we're gonna go check into a hotel and get some sleep. So I hope there are cameras around.

Jonathan Correia:

Also share with us your creepiest or weirdest hotel stories like what are some weird things about you? And maybe I'll tell you some of my hostel ones because

James Jay Edwards:

your dormitory ones. Oh, man, let

Jonathan Correia:

me tell you staying at a hostel for like almost a week in Edinburgh, Scotland. I got stories. Oh boy. Oh boy. All right.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, we're gonna get out of here. So we'll see you in a couple of weeks. So

Jacob Davidson:

for me James Jay Edwards. I'm Jacob Davison and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Jay and Jacob Review Pearl
Jacob Goes to Mass with Hellraiser and Hellbound: Hellraiser II
Correia Begins His HOOPTOBER Marathon, Includes Long Rant on Mikey
Jay and Jacob Review Speak No Evil
Correia Has a Full On ADHD Moment and Needs to Talk Full Eclipse
Happy 10th Anniversary Scream Factory!
Jay Reviews Don't Worry, Darling
The Boys Review Barbarian
Hotels, Motels, Air BnBs, and Hostels: Its a Horror Slaycation!
What Is It About These Places That is So Inherently Creepy?
Favorite Rental Horrors
Is it 14-08, 1-4-08, or 1408?
Outros
Restless Spirit Goes Hard ASF