Eye On Horror

Nightmare Pregnancies and Creepy Babies

May 23, 2022 iHorror Season 5 Episode 8
Eye On Horror
Nightmare Pregnancies and Creepy Babies
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode, the boys catch up on recent viewings of Firestarter, The Northman, Men, and more, Correia visits The Haunted Museum, and Jacob attends 2 movie marathons in one day. The boys review/praise HBOMax's The Baby and discuss Gynaehorror, films that center around horror involving pregnancy and nightmare inducing babies. 

Trigger Warning for this episode as we discuss heavy topics related to pregnancy horror.

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James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is episode 86. Otherwise known as season five, Episode Eight. I'm your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host, Jacob Davison, how you doing,

Jacob Davidson:

Jacob? Doing fun. Excited to get the gang back together.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, we're recording a little late in the game here. So we haven't seen each other in a while. But all's good because we're here now. Also with us yet again is your other other host, Jon Correia, how you doing? Correia.

Jonathan Correia:

I'm starting to feel like a human again. spent two weeks in Vegas working on American Ninja Warrior again. So, you know, I feel like any extended period of living out of a hotel kind of makes you feel inhuman. But in a place like Vegas, it's you lose your days very, very, very quickly.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, you do

Jonathan Correia:

sense of time. And I'm not even a gambler or party or, you know, any of that stuff. So like, I just it Yeah, it's still it still affects you?

James Jay Edwards:

It's just the city. Yeah, yeah. Cool. What do you guys been doing?

Jacob Davidson:

I finally saw The Northman.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, what do you think?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, it's a quote Metalocalypse. That was brutal.

James Jay Edwards:

It's totally. Yeah, no,

Jacob Davidson:

that no, that movie ruled. Ah, jeez. You know, it's just, I don't know exactly how to put it. It's just Robert Eggers just actually brought an epic to life. And it was funny too, because like, I didn't even realize that it was based off of Hamlet, or you know, the original Viking story. That was the basis for Hamlet until I was watching his like, Prince Amblin is like,

James Jay Edwards:

oh, Amblin. Yeah. Yeah, it's pretty loosely based on it. But yeah, it is. It is based on it. Yeah.

Jacob Davidson:

But no, yeah, that was amazing. You know, just the choreography on those fights. And some of those sequences like that. One of my favorites was the one with the undead Viking. That was badass. Yeah. And also like, I feel like I was ready for it because Robert Eggers actually did some guest programming at The Cinematheque. And so he played Conan the Barbarian, the original Schwarzenegger one never seen before. So seeing that then this you know, just like I, I feel like I'm in sync with it.

Jonathan Correia:

Conan the Barbarian. I recently watched that like, for the first time, because I've only seen clips or seen it on TV. That's one of those movies that it it kind of feels like it had no right to be as good as it was, you know, like, the like, the villain was well thought out and had the best lines and monologues like that

Jacob Davidson:

James Earl Jones,

Jonathan Correia:

James Earl Jones was just so enigmatic. And so just like, stole your attention, couldn't take my eyes off of him the whole time.

James Jay Edwards:

The big thing that I saw this week was Men, that the new Alex Garland movie, Alex Garland, who did Ex Machina and Annihilation,

Jonathan Correia:

How was it?

James Jay Edwards:

It's, it's pretty good. It's, it's an Alex Garland movie. So it's more abject horror than his other ones. It's less sci fi. Although the third act goes complete, Alex Garland, which is another way of saying it goes complete, David Cronenberg Jr. But it's it's basically about a woman played by Jessie Buckley, who is terrific, who she goes to this country. This country manor that she rents because her husband has just died, and she wants to heal. And this country manor is really isolated. It's located in a forest, which y'know that sets the whole that sets you up for what's going to go on, she started seeing this weird dude in the forest to like, kind of start stalking her. And it goes way deeper than that, like, the whole town is kind of crazy. So it kind of goes from home invasion to folk horror. But it is it's a crazy, it's just beautifully creepy. And it's one of those movies where you're like the whole time, you're kind of confused and you're like, is this gonna all come together? Is this going to all come together and it comes together about as well as Annihilation, I should say, you know, it's it kind of left me the end kind of left me feeling the same as annihilation where I'm kind of going I still not sure if I know what the fuck just happened, but it was pretty, you know, there's one thing that happened at the tail end that I don't know maybe once you guys see it, we'll do like a mini so because it's not really a spoiler, because I don't feel like it ties into the rest of the movie. Unless I miss Some believe that that's the kind of movie it is, where it's like, I feel like I need to see it again. Because I may have missed stuff in it. That might explain the ending better, which I guess could be said about Annihilation as well. But it's, it's definitely worth seeing. It's a I mean, it's from a technical standpoint, it's a masterpiece. It's just, the ending just feels a little like he's like, Okay, now I'm just gonna throw a bunch of goo in here, you know, so,

Jonathan Correia:

I love that. Goo.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. So it's, it's it's good, though. I mean, I did enjoy it. And you know it right now. It's probably it's somewhere in my top 10. I don't think it's as high as The Northmen or X. It might be number three. It might be number three on my top 10. I don't know I'd have to think about it. But yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

second viewing my because I that that's me with with some films that require like Annihilation, like I really liked it the first time but absolutely loved it the second time, once I was able to like get with the pace.

James Jay Edwards:

I think Alex Garland makes movies that you have to see because Ex Machina is the same way. I think he makes movies that you have to watch a couple times to fully appreciate. So maybe that's what this is.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, they're made to be analyzed. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Did you guys watch the new Firestarter?

Jacob Davidson:

No, no,

James Jay Edwards:

I didn't. Oh, oh,

Jonathan Correia:

first of all, I just want to shout out to John Carpenter and co. because they presented a very excellent score, which is hard to follow up because the original was Tangerine Dream. So congrats on that. I think it was John Squires that compared it to like early 2000s/90s straight to video quality. And I don't disagree with him. It felt very of that 90 straight to video made for TV Stephen King adaptation kind of, but that kind of worked for me a little bit. I don't know if it's a nostalgia for those days in the video store just collecting every VHS and DVD of a King adaptation I could get my hands on. But I kind of dug that a little bit. I will admit it. It is a little flat. And I was kind of hoping for more. Zac Efron I thought was very great in it. Kurt Woodmith was in it for like, two seconds, but like was obviously fantastic. And the end the league girl, it was really good. But overall, it just kind of felt a little flat.

James Jay Edwards:

That's early 2000s straight to video. I mean, honestly,

Jonathan Correia:

I wanted more, but I wasn't upset with it. You know what I mean? Like, I had fun. There's a few good moments, but I think just overall was just a bit underwhelmed. Yeah, again, I just wanted a little bit more. But a a King, always happy to watch the King adaptations. You know, even even when you get it's definitely not Langoliers level of cheese. So

Jacob Davidson:

as for me, um, there were not one but two horror movie marathons last weekend.

Jonathan Correia:

Geezum. How are you alive?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, here's, here's what it was. American Cinematheque Aero Theatre, was doing what they called the Shadow Noir, LA Horror Marathon. So it was all a horror movie set and shot in Los Angeles. Obviously, I believe it was. Let's see. They Live, Society, Slumber Party massacre, Angel. Oh, yeah, Chopping Mall and Night of the Comet. And I wasn't there for the whole thing. I was mostly working that day. So I was there for like first half. And it was hilarious to hear a lot of people who'd never seen it before his reactions to Society and the shunting scene got a oohs and ahhs back on the body horror. Yeah, a lot of visceral reactions on that one. And yeah, so and then I went to The New Beverly afterward because they were doing a mystery 90s marathon, which gotta give credit where credit is due they went like deep cut on that one, like very off the wall and like unheard of 90s movies like they did. Bret Leonard's Hideaway, starring Jeff Goldblum and Alfred Molina and Warlock 2: The Armageddon from Waxworks Anthony Hickox. Then Robin Flinders, The Unborn and then they ended it with perhaps the most 90s movie of all, Disturbing Behavior. Yes.

Jonathan Correia:

Classic

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, the audience collectively lost it shit when? flagpole Sitta started playing during the movie

James Jay Edwards:

was it one of those festivals where you don't know what's playing until it starts take

Jacob Davidson:

Exactly.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, so they knew Disturbing Behavior was or they didn't know disturbing behavior is coming.

Jacob Davidson:

Correct.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, cool. So let me get this straight. So you went to was this on the same day? So you went to the LA Marathon, then you worked a shift and then went to the new Bev?

Jacob Davidson:

Yes.

James Jay Edwards:

Wow. So is that like a 24 hour day for you?

Jacob Davidson:

More like 16 hours,

James Jay Edwards:

man,

Jacob Davidson:

I had the drive. Yeah, what can I say? I'm dedicated.

Jonathan Correia:

You can't say that the boys at Eye On Horror don't have endurance.

James Jay Edwards:

Another thing I saw was this little micro budget movie called Night Caller. Have you guys heard about this?

Jacob Davidson:

I think I've heard of it.

James Jay Edwards:

I think it would be your shit. Jacob. It's very 70s Giallo it's about a woman who's a I mean, even the plot sounds like a 70s Giallo. It's about a woman who she's like a telephone psychic. And she starts getting calls from a killer. And he's basically confessing to these to these crimes before he does them. And she has a psychic LinkedIn so he can she can see him kill as he's doing it. And it's a story wise, I feel like it's a little it's a little lacking and a little derivative. But from an aesthetic standpoint, a nail that that 70s slasher, Giallo thing, you know, and Kelly Maroney speaking of Night of the Comet. She plays the woman's mom and flashbacks. And Steve Railsback plays the killer. The killer is actually known from the beginning. So it's not really a mystery. It's more of a mystery of how it's gonna play out than it is. But it's a it's called Night Callr and said it's a brand new I think it went straight to VOD. So I think it's right up your alley, Jacob. I think you'd be into it.

Jacob Davidson:

So funny enough steel rails back was the bad guy in Disturbing Behavior. Yeah. Connecting that together.

James Jay Edwards:

He's hasn't he played both Charles Manson in Helter Skelter and Ed Gein in the Ed Gein movie, as well. No,

Jacob Davidson:

I dont remember.

James Jay Edwards:

I think I think he has. So

Jacob Davidson:

either way that movie does sound like it's up my alley.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, I think it is. I think it's definitely something that you'd be interested in. You should keep an eye out.

Jacob Davidson:

Or definitely.

Jonathan Correia:

Speaking of Charles Manson ad game, look at this beautifully orchestrated segway. While I was in Vegas. I had to do something spooky before I left so I went to Zac Bagans' Haunted Museum. Have you guys heard of this place?

James Jay Edwards:

I have not no.

Jonathan Correia:

Zac Bagans is one of the guys from Ghost Hunters, and does a lot of those like ghost hunting programs on Discovery and that and so he bought this haunted house. And that used to it's, I guess, used to have like, bad satanic rituals in there. I like to preface the bad kind, not the not the good kind of and then was a law office for a while because, you know, it had to get more evil. And then, and then he bought it and he's filled it with bad energy items, you know, haunted items. And, you know, it's fine. There's a lot of I, how do I put it best? There's a lot of celebrity death items in there. So there's, there's stuff where it's like, This chair was in the room that Michael Jackson died in, or this, you know, they had, I don't know if you guys ever watched the program Cat

James Jay Edwards:

Only one of them and they don't tell you House on HBO. But they had the deathbed for Nevada's biggest brothel owner who also became an assemblyman post mortem. Because, you know, Vegas that was weird because they had his bed and then the tour guide flat use a UV light to show the stains because you know, it's a bed from a whorehouse. And I think that should suffice they experienced because they had a lot of like, real items that were from stuff like they had the Dybbuk box, the infamous one. They had a piece from James Dean's car, you know, that he died in and there, there was a lot of items that were legit and cool. That, you know, required a lot of respect, but they were surrounded by a hokey haunted house setting. You know, like, they had Ed Gein's cauldron that he supposedly would, you know, go and drain his victims into. And it was in this room in this house that was made to look like a barn and they had like a mannequin hanging from the ceiling and stuff. And they had like, a basement where the supposedly really bad satanic rituals happened and like children were murdered down there, but like, it's like a very tight corridor down there. And there's a pentagram painted on the ground. And they had one of those, like, electrical boxes going. So it was like very creepy. And then like spooky because you're like, oh, wow, the really bad satanic rituals which one.

Jonathan Correia:

No they do tell you which one and it's also really happened here. And then you just tap on the wall and you very obvious which one it was like the first room and it did realize that it's like, you know, a construct wall and like they repurpose the basement to be spooky. So it was very hit or miss for me. But they didn't have cool stuff like that Bela Lugosi's haunted mirror there, which was really cool. They had pieces from the ship that Natalie Wood, you know, disappeared off of, and Jay you'll be happy. They had the rocking chair from one of Ed and Lorraine Warren's cases, they're the one where I think it was like Haunting in Connecticut, legitimately creeped me the hell out. But they also I think the you know, the child possession. And if you pay extra, you got to room that I thought was the best presented was the Jack Kevorkian get close and look at the rocking chair. And that was the room because they had the actual van that he performed a lot of only VIP thing that I skipped on, because we all know my the assisted suicides in they had the van there. And that one, opinions on Ed and Lorraine Warren. But yeah, it was fun. It I, I never want to say I enjoy these things. But that one I was very touristy. You know, and if you pay, you know, for the thought they put the most respect in, you know, it wasn't, you know, haunted housey. It was just like, a lot of facts, a lot VIP thing, you get to experience a few extra things, you know, go of facts about the people who made that decision. And I through a little tunnel, you get to go into a room where there's thought that was very well done. But, yeah, I mean, if you do the a lot of creepy dolls, and one of them is you know, bad juju VIP thing, you get a free shirt. So you know, it's it's it's very and all that fun stuff. Vegasy? So yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it's there used to be somewhere here in San Diego might even still be there somewhere. Or maybe it might have moved to LA. It was called The Museum of Death.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. Its still around. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. That's in Hollywood. Okay.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah. It used to be down here in San Diego. And the I went to it and this is at least 20 years ago, probably 25. And they had cool stuff like, like they had one of John Wayne Gacy his paintings. And the thing that most affected me of what they had was, um, they had a prison outfit that I don't know what which prisoner it was. They had his name there, but it wasn't a household name. But it was what he was wearing when he was executed in the electric chair. And they end you could see like burn marks on it. And you could see where they cut it to attach the electrodes and stuff. It was pretty damn creepy. And then there was like exploitative stuff like they had pictures, you know, of like crime scenes and one room you go in and they're playing, not Faces of Death, one of the real ones like Traces of Death, or you know, one of the ones that's actually real, not reenactments. They're playing that video as you walk around the room. So some of it was that was exploitative, but some of it was actually kind of cool. It sounds like the same kind of thing where like, you know, you have to hunt for the nuggets of cool within all the cheese.

Jonathan Correia:

And that's the thing, too, is that they did have a room in the Haunted Museum where it was built like a jail and they had artifacts from John Wayne Gacy, Charles Manson, Ted Bundy. And it was all like legit fact stuff like Ted Bundy's murder kit and stuff. And that room felt like Museum of Death. I went there six years ago, that was actually one of the early dates I went on with our producer Lindsey Gant. And she brought her little sister out with us. And I mean, if to compare the two I preferred the Museum of Death because they had it was more artifact based and and they had a lot of facts with it. And I thought, and it's more true Crimey than it is trying to be haunted house, you know, definitely towards the end of that experience, it felt more exploitive, but then again, they had a whole room dedicated to GG Allen. So you know, I dug that but I do vividly remember in a Museum of Death there's a hallway where it was just a bunch of photographs of this couple that like murdered or husband and they were getting covered in blood and you saw like them to cap and take the head and stuff and it was very real very shocking. And

James Jay Edwards:

then they they cut off his penis and stuck it in his mouth.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Oh, very, very graphic stuff.

James Jay Edwards:

It sounds like the same people who run who run it, but they might have gotten more stuff for LA because there was no GG Allen room when I saw that I remember that photo exhibit the series of pictures of that couple. Yeah. And it was, um, there was a hallway with the crime photos like you're talking about but it was the staircase down because this whole thing was in a basement kind of a building. So they were on the walls of the staircase that you after they take your ticket, you go down this staircase to get to the exhibits.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, see, when in LA they had it in the hallway leading to the exit if you needed to exit early.

James Jay Edwards:

Oh, if you exit early.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And I just remember going down and I was like, Oh, God, this is so fucking graphic. And I turn around, I see Lindsey and her little sister who's just like, just barely 18 And they started going down the hallway. I was like, no, no, no, no, no, no, we don't we don't go down here.

James Jay Edwards:

But yeah, those ones were a bit my that was like rotten.com Crap.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, yeah. Still, if you guys like true crime, and like spooky stuff, and you want to possibly be cursed by the Dybbuk Box, you know, Haunted Museum and Museum of Death. You know, they're fun destinations in your favorite tourist areas of LA and Vegas.

Jacob Davidson:

And see, I was at The New Beverly. Earlier this week, they were playing a double feature of rare Hong Kong horror movies. Yeah, that was, yeah, I haven't even really heard of these. But okay, so the first one was this anthology or duology movie called The Day That Doesn't Exist, which turns

Jonathan Correia:

that makes sense, because there's only 28

Jacob Davidson:

29 in the Leap Year. out it's February 30, if days in Feb.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, shit, you're right.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. But anyway, yeah. So the first is like the first segments kind of a monkey's paw situation where like a bride to bes husband dies in a car accident, and she wishes he was back alive. And he comes back as a ghoul. And then the second one is about this deadbeat dad, who also gets into a car accident, but he wakes up in the body of this rich social life with his beautiful wife. So he's trying to figure out where he wants to go back to his old life. But it turns out, the person whose bodies he's in possession of has all kinds of secrets. So it was a very Tales from the Crypt stuff type of movie like, especially in that Hong Kong horror type of way, where there's a lot of mix of slapstick, with the horror, because like, there's this bumbling cop character named Charles Chan, who the running gag as he gets his arms broken for both movies. And yeah, no, it's so it was pretty fun. The second movie was, was really wild, it was called Evil Cats. And it's basically a Wuxia version of Fallen. Because it's about like this construction site accidentally popping open this container that contained an evil cat demon that starts going around possessing people and also has its own like martial arts style. And this priest and this car driver have to team up to try and track down who's possessed by the evil cat and exercise it with holy arrows. And yeah, that one was much more violent and dramatic and had some pretty great fight choreography between the evil cat who looks kind of like you know, Cats cat when fully transformed. And lots of people getting impaled with like claws to the get Yeah, it does. I really like Hong Kong horror movies just because you have no idea how off the wall it's gonna get

Jonathan Correia:

those all sound like amazing things that I need to watch almost immediately.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, unfortunately, the apparently they're pretty hard to track down or rare, because that's the unfortunate thing. You know, there's so many Hong Kong horror movies never really made it officially stateside. Yeah. But if you can find it, I'd recommend it. Especially again, Evil Cat.

Jonathan Correia:

I will definitely try to track these down if I can. Another thing that I did was I listened to the audiobook of Cassandra Peterson's memoirs, Cruelly Yours. Cassandra Peterson, of course of Elvira fame.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. And did she did she do the reading?

Jonathan Correia:

She did do the reading, and I cannot recommend it enough. First of all, it's a great read. I have a physical copy as well. But I got a quarter away through it. And you know, it's a long drive to Vegas and back from LA. So hearing it from you know, Cassandra's own words and it's it's just so good because she wrote it with a bit of sass to on occasion and so it really comes through in there. And man Cassandra Peterson really was a real like Forrest Gump. Like she just met famous people all throughout her life and she details not only how she got Elvira role, but like like the first 20 or so chapters have nothing to do with Elvira it's just her life before it because she led such a cool life. She was a Go Go dancer, Vegas show girl when she was seven tiene, you know, for a year she met Elvis, Jimmy Page, Jimi Hendrix, just to name a few before she was even like 20. Like just all around coolest person ever she lived in a haunted mansion. Not on purpose either. She just loved the place. And it's just so cool. All her stories, and she remembers them so vividly as well. I can't recommend the audiobook enough. I obviously go out and buy a copy. But if you want to listen to the audiobook, don't forget there's the app Libby. We're not sponsored by them. But I fully support you know, public libraries. And it you can read listen to it through there by connecting it to your library card. So yeah, check it out.

James Jay Edwards:

We're going to segue now into our topic by discussing something that at least Correia and I have watched on HBO Max, The Baby.

Jonathan Correia:

Yes, it's my new favorite show.

James Jay Edwards:

It's It is crazy. This is honestly, you will be hooked within the first scene if you start watching The Baby. One thing that I always say this is the one thing that deserves to be spoiled in any movie or TV show. This baby kills a dog. Okay, so

Jacob Davidson:

Wow,

James Jay Edwards:

know that. Yeah, why me this baby. This baby kills a lot of things. But one of them is a dog. So if you're sensitive to to animal when we were watching it, when the dog scene is happening, my wife's like, if it kills his dog, I'm out. I'm done. I'm done. And sure enough, you're like, really? So anyway, if you're sensitive to that, this might not be for you. But this is the most crazy. It's a TV show. It's like a series and the episodes are half an hour long. And there's four of them out at the time this reporting so it's a pretty quick watch.

Jonathan Correia:

And it's absolutely it's a horror comedy. So the the premise of it is there's this woman, it's a Brit, this British woman who you know her friends are either have babies or are pregnant. And she takes some time to go kind of clear head about that because she's very staunch does not want a kid you know. And while she's, you know, clearing your mind in this cabin. This woman it's like at the bottom of a cliff. This woman is running from the cops with a duffel bag, she opens up the they make her open up the duffel bag, and there's a baby in it. And then the woman jumps off the cliff and goes splat next to the main character who's down below smoking a cigarette. It is then promptly followed by the baby crawling off the cliff and falling into the main character's arms. And

James Jay Edwards:

she happens to look up, she looks up to see where did this woman come from? And the baby just lands in her arms, you know?

Jonathan Correia:

And essentially, this baby is like a but the thing is the stares the stares are not like, you know cursed object basically like it like people just keep dying around it. It's very weird. Like people almost instantly they're just like, oh, yeah, that's your baby. She's like, this is this is not my baby. I did not just suddenly have a baby. And it's the comedy in it. It's just on point. The creepy factor is absolutely. Lindsey pointed this out. Very early on the baby stares. Like you know how babies just stare at things it makes sense. They don't know what the fuck is going on. They the show uses it to its advantage. And those baby stares which are already inherently creepy are just on point that the set of baby like the I think it's twin babies that they have amazing performance out of those babies and they just stare Damian from The Omen stairs they're like those wide eyed baby stairs that babies always do in the context of what's going on in the show. It's it's totally creepy. And it's funny because like this woman who has his baby, she tries to ditch it, but like she'll like try to ditch it somewhere and then her car won't start until she goes back and gets the baby and then her car will start I mean there's like weird stuff like that she can't get away from this baby. Yeah, and you can definitely tell that the baby's like influencing people around it and it's influencing her because there's other parts where she's like trying to you know that you get to a point where she's like trying to kill this baby and she can't because like it's you know, influences her instincts and whatnot and the commentary there of unwanted pregnancy is just absolutely done so well it's it's not subtle. It's not a subtle show. I mean, we're talking about like killer babies but it's not on the unsubtly of like Rubber you know where with the killer tire. But like it's it's definitely it's not subtle, but like it's it's just played out. It's so well, and it's about but like, No, it's not far off. But yeah, I can't recommend it enough. It's just so funny. It's so atmospheric the score and soundtrack

James Jay Edwards:

the score, the music is incredible, because the music is like, you think it's diegetic sound like, um, like when the woman is running from the cops, you know, and you and then all of a sudden, you realize that's the rhythm track to the score, because then they'll build over and that happens so many more times. Like you'll hear like, dripping water or clanging pipes, and then you'll realize you're like, oh, shit, that's probably the score. It's the score is incredible. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

it's very, there's a lot of throat singing in a lot, a lot of throat singing and chanting. And it really lends into because the deeper you get into the series, the you start to get into like, the history behind the baby. Like this is like she's obviously she's not the first one because you see the woman at the at the very top of the show. But like, how long has this been going on? Who else is has this baby? Who else has this baby like affected and whatnot? And yeah, that that forts. That fourth episode was absolutely bonkers. And I can't wait man. Like, it's, I'm almost, it was one of those ones where like, you know, a few episodes that come out. So I did a little bit of a binge. And now I'm all caught up. And I'm kind of pissed off that I have no more episodes to watch until the new one comes out.

James Jay Edwards:

I kind of do. I was just thinking, this is like, must see TV. It's like, I can't wait for the next episode. But I I'm kind of pissed that I didn't, really because it was I mean, it's a pretty quick binge, too. And went and we when we were done with the four episodes, I'm like, That's it

Jonathan Correia:

I know I need I need more baby. The Baby. anymore.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I'm interested in seeing how they get, you know, revolve an entire series around a killer baby. Because you know, you see, there are a lot of movies about killer babies. But a TV show, you know, I think that's the first

James Jay Edwards:

and it's you bring up a lot of movies about killer babies. Which is we are the King of segways. Today,

Jonathan Correia:

We are segewaying so hard today!

James Jay Edwards:

Do you want to introduce the topic Correia? Because yeah, and nothing is better than three males talking about pregnancy and babies, but we're gonna do it.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, I am. Well, this week's topic is definitely inspired by recent news. And of course, HBOMax's The Baby. We wanted to talk about pregnancy horror, and, and dive a little bit into killer babies and whatnot. But as Jacob said, there's a lot of them out there. And that's because you know, there's a lot of scary shit that can happen throughout the entire process, real life experience of it. And one of the things about horror, that's so great and beautiful is that there's the idea of processing horrific things or things that scare us. That's not only palatable, but there's a bit of catharsis with it. And in addressing these issues, and so we just wanted to highlight some films that covered these topics very well. And to start off, I mean, there's so few directors that can handle a topic that has to do so much with body that David Cronenberg. And I think two of his films embody the fears that can come with pregnancy and just fear on either side of this of the equation. With that, then The Brood and The Fly. The Fly, it's more so just that one scene of Gina Davis giving birth to the fly, human hybrid and that fear of giving birth to something abnormal or the preg or the pregnancy going wrong. But the brood I mean, those babies weren't conceived in the most conventional sense. They were essentially like, products of her rage, you know, and, and God those things were so fucking creepy man.

Jacob Davidson:

And I was like a little weird. Rubber masks.

James Jay Edwards:

It's so funny for me too, because I saw The Brood when I was probably way too young to see the brood when I was, you know, probably like eight or you know, nine. And I remember at the time, it was just this scary ass horror movie. Then when you watch it later in life, you realize all the subtleties and all the, you know, basically, for lack of a better word commentary that's going on and it it almost becomes scarier, but like, there are a lot of movies like that where I'll look back on that I saw that I just thought was, you know what you pick up on the nuances as an adult, but when you watch them as a kid, you're like, oh, this you know, like, like the Friday the 13th movies you don't realize that he's killing the people who are having sex until it's pointed out to you later on, but like, if you're like 10 Watching these movies, you're like, oh, yeah, he's just killing kids. Right?

Jonathan Correia:

Well, and it's, it's the same with The Brood, I mean, like, the bird themselves are manifestations of the rage she feels towards the abuse that she experienced as a child. And so it really speaks to survivors and PTSD. And, you know, to put it lightly the baggage that we carry from these experiences and how it can affect you. I mean, for the most part, we're not going to manifest that into, you know, demonic babies that come out of us. But you know, that feeling is there that if you carry this with you that it can grow and manifest into you into something that is uncontrollable, it's yeah, it preys on a lot of fears on both sides, not only dealing with these, you know, brood, but the being the, you know, the one that creates them. What are what are some films that that you

Jacob Davidson:

Well, I mentioned it earlier, I was guys? gonna say, say the main, we had the main discussion for the topic. So that Robin Flender movie from the 90s, The Unborn, well, if you haven't seen it, it's basically about this couple that want to conceive a baby and they decide and they've been having a lot of trouble. So did they decide to have a go through a an experimental fertilization procedure done? So hey, you know, the that goes in these types of movies. So yeah, it does, it doesn't go quite as planned. And yeah, it's a lot a lot to do with kind of the fears of genetic manipulation. And just, you know, kind of like, you know, where that nature between like, sight, science and pregnancy, and you know, where that can go, because, yeah, like the, like, some of the women that get impregnated with this technique start to go crazy and kill people. And there's a lot of body horror, and when one of these super babies is actually born, it just starts going around killing people. Yeah. So, you know, a lot of there are definitely some of these movies, which kind of tap into the fear of, I guess it's kind of a combination of the societal pressures to have a baby. And, you know, just kind of what lengths, you know, couples would go to conceive.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you guys seen the movie Proxy?

Jacob Davidson:

No, no,

James Jay Edwards:

it's from a few years back. It's, it basically is it's about what it actually has one of the most effective opening scenes that that I can remember ever seeing, but it's about a woman who she's leaving her OBGYN office and she is not really mugged. She's attacked in the street, just like, you know, brutally attacked and she loses her baby. And then she goes to a support group to like, to kind of get over it. And she meets another woman who has a kid is pretending not to have a kid. It's really, it's, it's kind of like you're saying, it's kind of a weird statement on, you know, people who want to have kids and people who don't want to have kids, you know, but it I just remember the opening scene, when I was watching it, it was one of one of those holy shit moments, you're like, Oh, my God, really? Wow.

Jonathan Correia:

To me gonna have to add that one to the list. Um, what about Prevenge, I know, we've discussed it a few times on the show, but that's another just brilliant horror comedy out there. Like it's still on Shudder at this time. And it's about a it's a British comedy slasher about this woman who, and it's written and directed by Alice Lowe, who was actually pregnant at the time. And, you know, as her pregnancy in the movie, as her pregnancy goes on, she starts to hear the voice of her unborn child, telling her to kill. And we have that beautiful line of dialogue where the husband's going, you're grieving. I'm not grieving. I'm just gest- I'm gestating fucking rage.

James Jay Edwards:

It reminds me of a scene in the office where Pam is pregnant, and she's getting sick from smells. And Dwight says, a tiny fetus is calling the shots. That's so badass.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, kind of ties into what we were talking about with The Brood.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And that fear of like what's manifesting in you? Especially, you know, and there's two sides of that, you know, like, there's the the movies where it's, it's someone that wants it and they're afraid that something, you know, evil is coming out. So there's, you know, Prevenge or Rosemary's Baby where

James Jay Edwards:

was just about to say, that's that's Rosemary's Baby as well. Yeah,

Jonathan Correia:

where it's something that they wanted, but like you know, Rosemary's Baby is definitely feeds upon like, you know, not only morning sickness and a lot of the other stuff have just come out of it. But the extreme of it, you know, she's losing weight while she's pregnant. It's like sucking the life force out of her. And then, of course, you get to the end and you find out, you know, it's it's the son of Satan and whatnot that the neighbors put in her. But yeah, I mean, there's there's a lot to draw on with it. I'm surprised. Jay hasn't brought up his favorite

James Jay Edwards:

movie yet. Boogie Nights. There's a pregnancy and Boogie Nights, but I don't think it's a plot point.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, I was gonna say A Quiet Place. Oh, yeah. Why place isn't entirely about the horrors of pregnancy. But like, I mean, that's the birth scene alone, just trying to give birth in a post Apoc in an in a in a unfriendly environment for what to give birth.

James Jay Edwards:

That's one of the things I don't get about A Quiet Place. Because when she's pregnant, basically, to term, it's like 400, and something days, which means they can see that child after this stuff was all going down. It's like, first of all, how do you do that that quietly? And second? Why would you do that? Why would you bring a child into that? Knowing selfishly, that this kid is going to cry and scream and possibly jeopardize you and your family's life? That's the one thing I don't understand about A Quiet Place why they even got pregnant?

Jonathan Correia:

Well, two things. First of all, you have sex quietly.

James Jay Edwards:

Maybe you do. I mean,

Jonathan Correia:

hey, let's not get into each other's sex noises here. But no, I mean, like, I mean, you know, you have to you have to have those moments with with your partner, you know, I mean, like, You got to have that connection every now and then, you know, the kids in the other room? Why not? But also, you got you got to

James Jay Edwards:

they did have three other kids.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. But also, you got to remember, this is a post A Quiet Place is a post apocalyptic, you know, setting. And so

James Jay Edwards:

I may have just answered my own question. Did their youngest kid already get snatched up by the monsters when they conceived? Because I think it was foreigner days after. So that might they might have been trying to fill that I may have just answered my own question. They may have been trying to fill that gap in their lives by having that other kid. Because, you know, we're spoiling a quiet place. But if you haven't seen it by now, and you listen to us, then you're, you know, what are you doing with yourself? Because in that opening scene, when that when that first son gets snatched, then I feel like it's in the future that she's pregnancy. I may, I may have just answered my own question about A Quiet Place that they may have been trying to kind of fill the grief by having another child.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Although I do think it is worth highlighting that. Yeah. It's the horrors of being pregnant in in a hostile environment. Because you know, what's worse than being pregnant? Being pregnant with a bunch of monsters around?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, just at the very baseline, just not having the necessities to ensure a safe birth. I mean, she was by herself in the bathtub. And, you know, also had, you know, this the monsters that are attracted to sound around her. I mean, it's it's given birth is already terrifying. So in that environment, it's elevated. And, yeah, I thought they handled that sequence Absolutely. terrifically. It's it's very nailbiting. But also just remember that they're in a post apocalyptic environment. So there's no doctors, there's no gynecologist, there's no one to prescribe birth control. I'm sure you know, this, you know, and that environment, they probably ran out of condoms and resources, you know what I mean? So like, the, the resources just aren't there. And that's terrifying. I mean, you there's no way of tracking if it's healthy. You know, like, it really is a miracle child kind of to put it weirdly. And and the second one that continues because, I mean, it's not only the given birth, but it's maintaining this baby's life without attracting monsters that are attracted to sound and babies are loud. I mean, I don't have what personally but I've heard them through walls, you know, with neighbors and stuff, and babies can be pretty fucking loud. So I mean, kudos, kudos for them for taking on that challenge. Because that's, that's rough.

Jacob Davidson:

Ya know, I feel like a lot of pregnancy horror is predicated upon, you know, just kind of like the environment and sort of surroundings of the pregnancy. You know, like we were talking about before with, like, Rosemary's Baby, which, you know, kind of the more I reflect on it, it's just kind of a common trope. That is, there's a lot of times it isn't just the horror of the, of the pregnancy or what was done with the pregnancy, but, you know, just kind of the surrounding reactions are like pressures from other people about the pregnancy because, you know, they feel like there's kind of a stock character to these types of stories who just like whenever something is going weird or wrong with a pregnant See, like, somebody else be like No, no, it's fine. You know have the you need to have the baby.

James Jay Edwards:

Have you guys seen this is going to be a little bit of a spoiler that it that it applies to our topic but you guys see Red Christmas. Okay, Red Christmas. And if you don't want it to be spoiled fast forward, you know about 15 seconds. The whole thing with red Christmas is that this family is being stalked by a killer. And the spoiler is that the killer is the mom is played by D Wallace. And the killer is her failed abortion from way back when so it's uh, yeah, it's a pretty messed up climax. It's a pretty messed up twist. And you're like, really? Yeah, anyway, just made me think of that when we're talking about you know, have the baby have the baby?

Jonathan Correia:

Well, and continuing with that there's also the kid Kindred, not the Kindred but Kindred that came out in 2020. That starred Tamara Lawrence and Fiona Shaw, about a woman who finds out that she's pregnant, and her husband dies shortly after. And so Fiona Shaw from Killing Eve, and Fleabag is like the mother in law and she forces Tamara Lawrence to kind of stay in the house because they're, it's almost like they're, they're wanting to replace the dead son with her kid, and it's just really weird and atmospheric and talk about a movie where you have those characters that are like, track forcing this woman against almost pretty much against her will the entire time to have this baby. Just, that's that's real. Creepfest. That's snuck up on me

Jacob Davidson:

quite a bit. Definitely. And I think perhaps one of the ultimate pregnancy horror movies is Alien. Yeah. You know, because, you know, that was, you know, like Dan O'Bannon, tapping in to the fears of pregnancy. But for men, you know, just just the idea of it being invasive and forced upon him, like we were discussing before with the body horror, you know, just as a you know, it's like applying a trope that usually is applied to someone else to someone else entirely. Yeah. And, you know, it's still considered one of the scariest movies of all times,

Jonathan Correia:

there's just the Alien franchise as a whole. I mean, Prometheus had that super gnarly scene.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

Naomi, Rapace, you know, essentially aborting the Xenomorph that's inside her in such a graphic and gnarly scene. I mean, yeah, the Alien franchise is very much so. body horror, and I will fight anyone on that, because so much of it, you know, is about that violation of body of something entering you. And to forcing, you know, not only consuming you, but killing you in the process. And, yeah, it definitely preys on a lot of those fears. And, and terror, it's effective. And you're right, yeah, have putting it into men. It's. So it's a lesson learned. For certain.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, and that's the thing. Like, I feel like so many of these movies are predicated upon, you know, the horrors of having bodily autonomy and agency violated, you know, like, a lot. You know, yeah. I mean, how many horror movies involve either like somebody being forcibly impregnated by the devil, or, you know, like occolts or, yeah, you know, like, as thinking again, you know, spoilers for a movie that's been out for a ridiculously long time. The House of the Devil, you know, just, you know, just like the women being treated as an incubator instead of as a human being.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. Or even one of our favorite films of last year Titane.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yes. Yes. contain. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, if you're getting anything to pregnancy, or what's more terrifying than being impregnated by car,

James Jay Edwards:

give birth to a car? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, yeah, and you're right. I mean, spoilers

James Jay Edwards:

for tonight. We're spoiling everything today.

Jonathan Correia:

Apologies, folks. But at the at the end of the day, yeah. The A lot of the basis of a lot of Gynaehorror, I believe, is the term comes from that violation of, as Jacob said, autonomy of having control over one's body of you know, that violation of something entering it, whether it be a Xenomorph for Satan himself, you know, and having to carry it to term or just, you know, having it consume you from the inside and And, you know, it's I, every single one of these films that we've talked about has, you know, holds up and those fears are still here. And with the recent news, you know, that's been going around. I think they're more prevalent than ever. Because, you know, there's, I mean, as Jay said, at the beginning, we're three men talking about pregnancy and the horrors of it's something that we we will probably never experience and yet we're sharing our opinions on it. And so, you know, there's a lot of that going on right now.

James Jay Edwards:

We're just three liberal Grifters.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, well, liberal Grifters pushing our agenda.

James Jay Edwards:

Seeing we do we do read our reviews?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, we do. Very much. So sometimes on repeat in our heads for days. But yeah, I mean, it these these fears are here because they're very real. These are these are very real III. I know, as I said, from the beginning, horror is something to process fear, to process, real life in palpable ways, something that is makes it not only comprehensible, and palpable for yourself, but to have others experience as well. And I think gynahorror is is one of those important genres, just as any other genre where, you know, marginalized groups share their real life experiences in a way for others to experience you know, so yeah, I'd say like, broaden your horizons watch more of these films. I mean, they're, they're out there. And they're being made today. I mean, we just had the very great, you know, False Positive come out last year on Hulu, with Ilana Glazer, which was very atmospheric, very creepy, very bonkers. And then you also have anti birth with Natasha Lyon, which is absolutely phenomenal. It's not just her it's also you got make Tilly in there. I mean, Natasha, Leone and make Tilly you should already be sold on that movie. But yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I think a lot of these movies also another thing that's terrifying about them is they do kind of with loss. And because like if you look at movies, even movies, like like The Omen where they know, this kid is a child of devil, and one of the most powerful scenes in the moment is one where the dad knows he's got to kill this kid. But the kid is looking at him and No, no, Daddy, you know, he's turned from the son of the devil into his son again. And, and you're in he like, can't do it. You know, there's this movie from around the same time his proxy called Absence. It's about this is a little on the nose with the loss thing. But um, basically, it's about a woman who she has a she has a pregnancy, she's carried to term, and she wakes up one morning and it's gone. She's just not pregnant anymore. And she has not had the kid or anything. And so it's one of those. I mean, how terrifying would that be? To wake up all of a sudden you're just not pregnant?

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, Midnight Mass covers that as well.

James Jay Edwards:

And I know that it's that sits into to Rosemary's Baby Baby as well, because like, you know, this cult wants her baby and she's like, No, you can't have my babies aren't Oh, no, she's got her father's eyes, either. He's got his father's, you know, but who's his father?

Jonathan Correia:

It's, it's something that grew inside you and, and is is very much or yours and a part of you. And it's immediately taken away. Yeah. It's a very real thing that happens every day, in this system, as well. You know, that's sudden, it's, it's no longer yours and that and yeah, Rosemary's Baby feeds into that fear of autonomy, because it's not hers. It's the father's, you know, or the baby's father. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

And how hard it is, even if that's the decision that's been made. I mean, and now, you know, yeah, we're getting more liberal grifting again, but, you know, for the people who do choose adoption, that's basically what they're doing. They're doing the Rosemary's Baby thing.

Jonathan Correia:

Not everyone is also also has the choice when it comes to adoption. Sometimes it is forced upon them due to our, you know, systems in place. So, yeah, if you haven't gotten the point yet, we very muchbelieve that.

James Jay Edwards:

If we haven't been liberal enough for you, yeah, if we haven't been liberal enough

Jonathan Correia:

for you today. Just remember, everyone has the right to decide what to do with their body, especially women. And, you know, there's no other takeaway from it from us or our discussions and if, if you disagree with us, we you know, you're allowed to disagree, but that's where we stand and, you know, back to will next week, we'll return to just you know, talking about comic book movies and horror movies and all that stuff,

James Jay Edwards:

I mean, if you want to argue it, I don't think any of the three of us really want to entertain that. But let's hear it. If you disagree with us, let us know. And you know, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. And we're, you know, the Eye On Horror page is not the place to argue it. If you want to try to change our minds. Good luck. But um, yeah, so I think this is a good place for us to call this an episode.

Jonathan Correia:

Even if you disagree with with those sentiments, check out these movies. They're phenomenal movies, created by amazing filmmakers all around and you probably already have seen a few and didn't realize that that's what they were about. And so yeah, please check out these movies.

James Jay Edwards:

And let us know if we missed any of your favorite pregnancy movies that may even solidify the message or if you know any that have the opposite message. Let us know we we always love hearing about movies.

Jacob Davidson:

If there's a wide world of horror out there. Yes, there is.

James Jay Edwards:

Our theme song is by Restless Spirits. So go give them some love. And our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go give him some love. You can find us at Eye On Horror, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, were everywhere. or at ihorror.com And that, you know, you should check out iHorror.com Anyway, because they've got Kelly had a great interview with Bria Grant that you guys should all read that that's our plug for iHorror at the end of this episode, Kelly from Murmurs in the Morgue interview Bria Grant. So check that one out.

Jonathan Correia:

And I just want to give a shout out to Christy Stockton from Creepy Catalog who put together a phenomenal list of gynaehorror films that we we reviewed and did some helped with our research in this episode. So thank you, Chrissy. That that was very helpful in preparation for this episode. So thank you.

James Jay Edwards:

Yep, thank you. So we will see you in a couple of weeks. So for me, James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison

Jonathan Correia:

and I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your eye On horror.

Intros
Jacob Reviews The Northman
Jay Reviews Men
Correia Reviews Firestarter 2022
Jacob Attends 2 Horror Marathons Like A Champ
Jay Reviews Night Caller
Correia Visits The Haunt Museum in Las Vegas
Jacob Attends Screenings of Rare Hong Kong Horror Films
Jay and Correia Praise HBOMax's The Baby
Main Topic: Pregnancy and Horrors of Babies
A Quiet Place: Pregnancy In A Hostile Environment
Alien And Pregnancy Horror
Outros