Eye On Horror

Real Body Horror: The Legacy of Jackass

February 28, 2022 iHorror Season 5 Episode 3
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This episode, Jay discovers a new favorite podcast, Jacob gets back into Magic: The Gathering with the new Universal Monster cards, and Correia leads a discussion on the morbid curiosity with the legacy of the Jackass franchise.

https://linktr.ee/EyeOnHorror

James Jay Edwards:

Welcome to Eye On Horror, the official podcast of iHorror.com. This is episode 81. Otherwise known as season five, episode three. I am your host James Jay Edwards and with me as always is your other host, Jacob Davison, how you doing, Jacob,

Jacob Davidson:

doing? Well, had a pretty relaxing week and excited to be back on the podcast.

James Jay Edwards:

I'm excited too. I had a stressful week. But hey, now I get to hang out for an hour with my buddies. Also. With us yet again is your other host Jon Correia How you doing Korea?

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, man, we're back in the early mornings are doing good. I finally finished my my my super long gig that I started back in October and immediately jumped into two more. So

James Jay Edwards:

that's what I say my stressful weeks are because of work. And that's a good problem to have having too much work.

Jonathan Correia:

I was hoping to take a couple of weeks off but hey, you know, when you plan to take time off is when you get the most offer. So

Jacob Davidson:

yeah, no, I feel bad. Like it's either. Everything's happening at once or nothing's happening and yeah, I've got a lot of irons in the fire right now myself.

Jonathan Correia:

Hell yeah. Cheers to being busy. Everyone raised their energy drinks.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, man, I stopped drinking energy drinks because one time at work I drank a five hour energy and I was so hyperactive, I had to run around the parking lot three times to burn off the energy.

James Jay Edwards:

five hour energies are bad five oh args those those give you like heart palpitations. I remember one time, when I worked at Guitar Center, we the the Red Bull girls would come in and also like the Monster Girls, they would come in and they are bring us cases of the stuff. And I remember, I drank two monsters while I worked. And I had school that night. It was a documentary film studies class. And I remember specifically, we watched The Atomic Cafe, The Atomic Cafe it's a documentary about the nuclear scare of it was made in the early 80s There was a documentary about like all of the like, you know, ducking cover, hide in your bomb shelter. You know, it was great. It was like it kind of was making fun of the 50s view of the Nuclear Shadow. But it is it's actually kind of scary. I think it's on Kino Cult if you want to watch it, it's pretty good, though. But anyway, there I am sitting there watching The Atomic Cafe. And my I felt like my chest my heart was gonna be out of my chest. It was I'm, I still drink monster. So I just don't drink them in that kind of quantity so quickly, and then sit and watch The Atomic Cafe. What's been going on? There hasn't been a whole lot of horror that has been come out since last time we talk what's been happening.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, the new Texas Chainsaw came out literally this morning. Yeah, but none

James Jay Edwards:

of us have seen it. So why even bring it up? So, you know, I'll tell you one thing. It's not a horror movie, but I discovered a podcast that I like more than ours. Ooh, more than ours. Oh, almost as much a hard hurdle. There's this YouTube guy named Mr. Ball. And I don't know if you guys have heard of him. But he, in his own words, he does the strange and mysterious delivered in story format. That's how he says, And he um, he's he has a podcast now. And basically, he'll tell stories that are usually true. Sometimes you can doubt them because he told the Russian Sleep Experiment story on his YouTube channel. He told it as true and then at the end he said, Now this might not be real it might just be a creepy pasta. I'm like well, it's totally agreed not to do but anyway, he has a podcast that he posts a couple times a week and they're like longer stories that are on his YouTube channel. It's just called the Mr. Bollen podcast and it's it's it's pretty cool if you like those kind of true crime but more exploitative ones anyway.

Jacob Davidson:

Well as for me it's not exactly a horror movie related but I

James Jay Edwards:

have a feeling this is going to be the not exactly horror episode.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh the fringe guy is having issues with us discussing stuff that isn't quite

James Jay Edwards:

I'm not having issues with it. I'm just saying we probably don't need to read off every single thing we say with that because we'll be saying it all episode.

Jacob Davidson:

Well, let me say like I I got back into Magic the Gathering, you know, the tabletop game been a lot of fun and, um, you know, just the thing was I was really into it back in like high school in college and now that it's more accessible to be in stores and stuff again, it's I had to go for it because they had two sets recently that had my interest like One, the newest one is called comic goblin new neon dynasty where it's kind of like, Blade Runner, but magic. So Ed has got ninjas and Samurai and stuff, which is a lot of fun and bet on the horror side of things. They had a release called Innistrad double feature I'm holding up the booster pack. It's like Universal Monsters themed where the cards are black and white. And there's like vampires, monsters, werewolves and ghosts. Like, got a couple cards right here. Alchemists retrieval and Geist waves, which is the other thing I really loved about Magic the Gathering the art on the cards is really cool looking. Especially for monsters.

Jonathan Correia:

Didn't they include Godzilla in a in an expansion or something a couple of

Jacob Davidson:

these they did. I think it was called I Korea. And I actually did try to collect some cards from that. But the other thing was is that all the Godzilla cards were very rare, so it was kind of hard to get those. But ya know, it's just been nice to kind of pick up that hobby again, and to do something that doesn't involve me using a phone or computer. I played some local tournaments and I won 3 20 sided die.

James Jay Edwards:

Imagine that Jacob won something that never happens. It's such

Jonathan Correia:

a rarity. I'm super not jealous.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, I yeah, just kind of happens.

Jonathan Correia:

Well, I've definitely been feeling a bit of the of the not a lot of new stuff coming out horror wise. So I've been catching up by putting a little catch up game so I finally watched Nightmare Alley, which was great. Absolutely loved it. Wait,

Jacob Davidson:

did you see the color version or the black and white version?

Jonathan Correia:

They only have the color version on streaming services because I'm not. I'm still not really going into theaters right now. But uh, so I watched on HBO Max, and it still it looked fantastic. Very excited for my 4k just to come in. I also finally watched Resindent Evil Welcome to Raccoon City. Well, yeah, it was fun. I mean, like, you know, it definitely felt like the studio's went okay, we hear we hear that you guys weren't too happy with us producing like a dozen films that kind of didn't really have to do with the games. So we're gonna straight up adapt the first two games very much but it did feel like there were there were times where they were a bit too focused on recreating the game and not so much focused on creating the horror if that means Yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

that's that's a fair criticism. But but it was still a lot

Jonathan Correia:

of fun. I'm not someone who's super into the Resident Evil for Resident Evil lore, and, you know, even I still like recognize and like, got a lot of the fanfare so I had a lot of fun with it. You know? I'm excited for a second one.

Jacob Davidson:

Oh, yeah. No, I hope I hope they do and I and I do like Yohannes Roberts his work and I think he did a pretty good job of adapting the game and bring in a whole lot of monsters especially because this was not as big I don't think it was as big a budget as some of the other Resident Evil movies, which kind of shows but also it feels like it actually cuts to the core of the spirit of the games because the original Resident Evil games were inspired by the same schlocky like low budget be American horror movies, like one of the final shots in the game was inspired by Williams, Gertler is Grizzly. And also that scene where because Johan is Roberts is great to Muse at needle drops, like the the I forget, I forget the artists but that song Crush plays while Leon's at the desk and the flaming zombies walking. Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, the slomo flaming zombie said to and wait in the morning and step outs. Right

Jacob Davidson:

now know the song Crush, I forget who the artist was, but like Leon said, that does listen to that, and the zombies walking towards them. Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

Lindsey might have just been singing that song. Yeah, well, I

Jacob Davidson:

mean, that was like the theme song for the trailer, which in retrospect, was actually really clever. And also, it's like, it's a set in the 90s. So it feels like it's got a 90 Soundtrack

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, the 90s aspect of it. I really enjoyed I thought that was a lot. They had a lot of fun with that and keeping stuff retro and keeping it up to the time and whatnot. I was a little disappointed that Daryl from Letterkenny only was in it for like two seconds as the PIO. Yeah. Yeah, I forgot about that. Spoiler. Sorry. He wasn't in it much.

Jacob Davidson:

Also, Donal Logue? He was great as the police chief just said, you know, just being a complete jerk. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

Speaking of needle drops, another thing that I watched for the first time and Correia and I had a really good discussion going before we hit record, so we might want to pick some of that back up. Ralph Bakshi, his American Pop, which is basically an animated, it covers four generations of people who emigrate to America and the music that kind of follows him around and it's got you know everything from like old you know swing and jazz standards to it ends with a Sex Pistols song. It's needle

Jonathan Correia:

drop the movie. Like that's that soundtrack is phenomenal. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

it and yeah, it totally. And they even say at the end that you know, they it's the first thing they show is that is the the song list and it says, you know, hey, we want to recognize the actual composers because a lot of them are not the original versions of the songs. And they say we want to recognize the original composers of the songs and it lists every song in the movie and who wrote it. And there's like 40 freakin socks. You know, they just keep coming.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. And that that was the thing it was it was created by Ralph Batchi. You know who did like the original animated Lord of the Rings, Fire and Ice Wizards Cool World.

James Jay Edwards:

He did the Harlem shuffle for the Rolling Stones. But not opposites attract for Paula Abdul. Nobody working Spider-man and Mighty Heroes and Correia actually dropped a bit of knowledge that he worked on The New Adventures of Mighty Mouse. And the reason he got that was because he lied to people saying he had the rights to money.

Jonathan Correia:

When you're starting your new animation studio, and you're trying to get funding people want to know like, what do you have, besides original IPs that are risky? And he was you know, an established IP that hasn't been made in a long time he so he kept saying like, Oh, yeah, have the rights to Mighty Mouse. Oh, yeah. Have the rights my mouse and then he got funding and what fuck? Who has the rights of Mighty Mouse? And that's how the new adventures of Mighty Mouse basically came to be was

James Jay Edwards:

also his big break was he did Fritz the Cat. Yeah, he went from Hanna Barbera to doing Fritz the Cat. So this dude, yeah, I don't think animation would be the same without him. And it was just interesting, because I had never seen American Pop before. And so it was just one of those things I popped on, you know, to unwind at the end of the day, and I found myself just like, Okay, this is not unwind music. This is wind you up? This is a wind you up?

Jonathan Correia:

Totally. No, I still have my VHS copy from many moons ago of that its phenominal. His rotoscope styling was just so beautiful. But yeah, I would highly recommend Wizards. It's fantasy. It's Tolkien inspired. But it's not. It doesn't fit into those tropes a whole lot. And there's some like beautiful, gorgeous rotoscoping in that film. Like one of the great parts of is it takes place in the far distant, post apocalyptic world where Fantasy has taken over, you know, fantastical elements of magic and whatnot. And the villains find old reels of like, Nazi propaganda, they start utilizing that to inspire their evil ways and whatnot. And Bakshi ends up like rotoscoping over the doing animation over the footage, and it's really dark and harrowing and just a fantastic film. But yeah,

Jacob Davidson:

yeah. And as for me, I did a lot of horror rewatches especially around Valentine's Day, they did a repertory screening of Cronenberg's, The Fly from Friday night. frights. And, man, that movie, you know, just every time, you know, I think, you know, it's like, Oh, I've seen it before it is hard, but no, man, it hits like a freight train. Like every time I see it,

Jonathan Correia:

did our discussion about the fly in the last episode put a different spin in perspective on this new watching of it of us focusing more on like the toxic relationship of

Jacob Davidson:

you know, the other dimension it I think I think it did, you know, just kind of watching, you know, not only his body fall apart, but their relationship fall apart. You know, just because, yeah, you know, like you remove kind of the science fiction factor. It's basically a romantic dramadey until, you know, his fingernails start falling off. Yeah, no, I mean, like, I, I do feel like it. You know, like outside of the, you know, like more visceral focus on the disease that yeah, no, it works perfectly as a parable on a relationship, not even starting toxic, but turning toxic like that.

James Jay Edwards:

Speaking of toxic relationships, another thing that I that I rewatched just basically to try to unwind and it got me wound up again. Passengers remember Passengers, Chris Pratt, Jennifer Lawrence, they're on that spaceship going to another planet. And his his hollow pod breaks. So he wakes up and he's gonna die before they get to the planet. It's supposed to be 120 year journey. And he's so lonely. He fucking wakes Jennifer Lawrence up to keep him company. It's so terrible. I mean, I understand why he did. It's that it's really a rock and a hard place because the dude's only companionship is the bartender robot. So he's like, okay, you know, I'm lonely. I'm gonna wake this girl up. And of course, she's pissed when she learns, which is I'm kind of pissed at the bartender robot for spilling the beans on that tube. cuz he made a promise and what good is a promise to a robot? If he doesn't keep it? But anyway,

Jonathan Correia:

so robot outside of the fundamental, you know, Laws of Robotics like what morals does a robot have to abide by? I mean, like, as long as it's not directly murdering or harming a person or its creator, like, there's three basic, I don't remember the rule that

James Jay Edwards:

funny thing Chris Pratt says to him says, Hey, don't tell her Let me tell her myself. And he's like, Oh, okay. It's like, that's not in robots programming. machinery is supposed to tell you the truth. Yeah, but anyway, that's, you know, just another one of those. Another one of those things, we should have brought that up for toxic relationships last week, because that,

Jonathan Correia:

yeah, I still haven't seen that one. But

James Jay Edwards:

the thing is, it could have been a pretty good movie, if they started it at about where Act Two starts, if they started it with her waking up, and then she meets him. And then they make a be a huge reveal that he's the one who woke up the concept, they could have made it a lot better of a movie. If they had started it at a different place and then revealed,

Jonathan Correia:

it's kind of like Zack Snyder's Sucker Punch, like if you cut out like that first, like 20 minutes or so where it's just like this, like the mental hospital stuff, and then like had that kind of be a reveal later. That would have been more interesting, though. It also would have been a lot shorter, which would have been

James Jay Edwards:

Passengers could have could have stood being about 20 minutes shorter, too, though, so that I, I do think how do you fix Passengers, we should at least do a minisode on that.

Jacob Davidson:

On the lighter side, I watched two kind of comedy horror movies recently, that Got releases from Shout Factory, Summer School, and Mel Brooks's Dracula Dead And Loving It? You guys have seen those right?

James Jay Edwards:

In summer school, a horror comedy? Is it just like a regular comedy?

Jacob Davidson:

I mean, it's kind of a comedy, but the thing is, is that okay, so it's I'll start with summer school. It's basically this high school comedy from Carl Reiner. And it's about this gym teacher who was about to go on vacation Hawaii, but the usual summer school teacher wins the lottery and Bails who's actually played by Carl Reiner. And so he has to replace them. And you know, it's the usual it's like the class of misfits and near do-wells, who all got the bronze but the horse factors that there's these two characters named chains on Dave who are obsessed with like, movies like The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and the effects work of Rick Baker. And they do like a bunch of stunts with like horror movie effects. And there's a particularly standout set piece where like they pretend everybody's been killed in these crazy over the top ways to freak out the new substitute teacher. So I do feel like it's it is kind of a shout out for the horror fans in that regard. But yeah, and I also watched Dracula: Dead and Loving It, which was the last movie that Mel Brooks directed and I feel like gets a bad rap because it is it is really funny. And like when I was a kid, I rented it all the time from blockbuster. And it's basically you know, like it well it came out post Francis Ford, Coppola's Dracula, which I think is what helped it gains steam to get made, but it largely satirizes the original 1930s Universal Draco movement Bela Lugosi, but Leslie Nielsen is a very underrated Dracula in my opinion, because I mean, sure, yeah, he's got a lot of slapstick and stuff, but it's just he does kind of play it seriously at times, and he is the bad guy. And he does have a lot of great stunts. Like he slips down the stairs and writes himself up and he says he's fine and then his shadow like, just kind of crawls back up because the shadow took the brunt of the damage. And also, Mel Brooks himself plays Van Helsing so you got a lot of moments with like, Brooks's Van Helsing going toe to toe with Nielsens Dracula, which is just a very funny dynamic.

James Jay Edwards:

What you said about renting Dracula: Dead and Loving It all the time made me think of was it was it AMA, who would rent Monster Squad all the time until the store just gave her? They just gave it to her? Was that ama or was it Heather? It was one of those two things. It was Heather. I think it might be Yeah. But um, remember the days of video stores when they didn't sell movies, you had to rent them. So if you wanted to

see something like Dracula:

Dead and Loving It over and over again, you just have to keep renting.

Jonathan Correia:

That's how they get you. That's what happened with us and Zoolander after like four or five times of renting and my parents were just like, Alright, fine. We'll buy you a coffee. Jesus.

James Jay Edwards:

This was before you could buy them in a lot of Kate like, you know, back in the old days when they were you could buy them but they'd be like 90 bucks. Yeah, but you know, now it's almost cheap. To buy them in some cases then rent them.

Jonathan Correia:

It was a it was top gun that changed that Top Gun was like one of the first VHS tapes that was priced at 20 bucks you know and that kind of that kind of set the standard for like home releases that's why a lot of new home releases are around roughly 20 I mean now obviously now with the new 4k and all that that's a bit pricier but I remember I

James Jay Edwards:

got a VHS of ET and I think it was from Sears it wasn't from a video store or you know normal one and it was $4.99 so it but that was another one of those you can own it screw renting own E T for $4.99. And I think you may have had to spend like 20 bucks in the store in order for the privilege to buy E.T. for five bucks, but it was one of those big promotions through like Sears or may company or JC Penney, one of those you know,

Jacob Davidson:

speaking of physical media, like actually ordered this movie because the director passed away recently. I got Evolution, you know, the 2001 movie from Ivan Reitman

James Jay Edwards:

moment of silence for Ivan Reitman. The man who brought us Ghostbusters,

Jonathan Correia:

and so many other.

James Jay Edwards:

Yeah, but most people Ghostbusters, this is legacy.

Jacob Davidson:

Well, yeah, though. He also did Meatballs. But no, I was a big fan of evolution when I was a kid. And I said, Yeah, it's like I've already seen Ghostbusters recently. So I figured, you know, give that one another shot. And, you know, it holds up better than I expected. I mean, the humor was definitely a lot raunchier than I remembered. Like, it's been years since I'd seen this one, but the monster effects hold up surprisingly well, especially because, like, apparently Phil Tippett was behind that. So there's a lot of CGI, but when they go practical, like, the practical effects look astounding, like the big blue apes like those those things creeped me out. And also, it's definitely has that feeling of like, kind of a late 90s, early 2000s movie because, you know, you got the cast with like, let's see. Yeah, David Duchovny and Julianne Moore, Orlando Jones, and of course, Sean William Scott. So it does have kind of that the DNA of Ghostbusters in it, because, you know, you got to kind of a ragtag team versus this kind of paranormal threats. And it is interesting, too, because, like, it's not even like a specific alien. It's like a menagerie of aliens because it's like this meteor hits or, and is this like goo in the meteors, like some kind of protoplasm for this alien environment. So like, it starts spawning worms and plants and like little dinosaurs and terror tackles and, like giant spiders and mosquitoes and full blown apes. So, so I thought that was always an interesting kind of direction to that also gave us that happy, smiley face with the three eyes. very iconic.

James Jay Edwards:

So I guess that for not having much horror come out the last couple of weeks. We did have a lot to talk about. But let's move on to our topic, which I'm going to defer to Correia to introduce it because I'm not sure if I understand the assignment. Maybe he can explain it and I'll Oh, I understand a little bit.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, you Oh, yo, how about we defer to me as though as the Resident Jackass

James Jay Edwards:

jackass.

Jonathan Correia:

So yeah, this week, you know, this month we saw the release of the new Jackass Forever film and it got me thinking a lot about its impact not only on my life, but just like on pop culture as a whole. And I did make it horror related is you know, what it features a lot of which is real life body horror, you know? I don't know about you guys. But for me growing up, like Jackass came out right around the time when I was like nine or 10. And it was very much so the kind of Faces of Death for me, at least, you know, because growing up in the, in the woods, we didn't have good internet and you know, you had maybe like 15 minutes a day of decent internet. So we didn't watch YouTube and all that stuff wasn't finding weird videos online wasn't a part of my childhood a whole lot. But, you know, turning on MTV late at night and watching, you know, Johnny Knoxville get kicked in the cup, you know, that was something that was like, kind of attainable. And I remember specifically my sister put on the premiere of the second episode of my mom walked in, right when Steve O is trying to vomit up alive goldfish and she immediately was like, What the fuck are you watching? Or like watching this show? It's called Jackass and they're like, of course it is. And then finally shut it off. That was the thing is it was kind of like a forbidden fruit. Something that you had to go out and see seek. And I remember having that that effect, as you know, here are these guys doing this, these gross things. And there's a morbid curiosity that comes with that and us as humans seeking that out. So kind of want to ask you guys, what was your first experience of Jackass like in watching this material?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, for me it was probably just kind of catching glimpses on TV. Like I think my sister was more to MTV than I was. And, you know, occasionally like, I peeked in while she was watching. And, you know, just see people get, do these ridiculous stunts and get injured, you know, that was just kind of face value for me. But yeah, no, I mean, there is a morbid curiosity to these stunts, which, you know, like, which is the other thing too, you know, like, like you were saying, you know, this was like, kind of at the dawn of the Internet age, so this was like when clips and stuff could be sent around. And as this kind of helped it pick up steam. So, yeah, and also that I did see the first Jackass movie in theaters. Don't remember it too well, but I do love. I will never forget that opening where they're riding the giant shopping cart while the explosions go off all around them said to Carmina Burana,

Jonathan Correia:

by Ennio Morricone.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no, that was that was. That was an incredible way to start the movie, especially once they crashed into that wall.

James Jay Edwards:

My introduction to Jackass was the MTV TV show. And, and I remember I used to love it now that the show didn't go quite as far as the movies do. I've only seen the first Jackass movie. I think I've probably seen scenes from the others. But the show I actually I thought was really really funny. Ember, Johnny Knoxville, he, you know, he always started. I'm Johnny Knoxville, and I'm gonna return a punt. And then, after a turn of fun, well, a football team tackles him, you know, that kind of thing. Or I love the wee man sketches. You know what he would dress as an Oompa Loompa. And just like run around places and the reactions, because it was almost like reality TV before there was reality TV because he'd be running down a Hollywood Street as Oompa Loompa. And people are like, What the hell is this? Like, it's like a hidden camera thing. But yeah, I remember loving the the MTV show. I thought it was freakin hilarious. You bring up faces of death, and I'm from the generation, probably before you were faces of death. It was a big. There was no, this is probably staged. But there was a deal where a teacher got in trouble for having the first faces of death in their classroom for kids to watch. And that bandit, which was probably the best thing, because if you've seen the face of death movies, they're not that good. I mean, they're all reenactments, probably 90% reenactments, they're kind of hokey the guy I don't even remember the host name but he you know, he's like, he's a goon. But the thing is, it being banned is what made people want to watch it. And you know, of course, you know, you had to know what video store you were talking about. You know, this is this is the days for ownership. You had to know what video store had the balls to have the Faces of Death movie so you could go rent them, but nobody would care about those movies if they didn't get banned. That's why I think that you know, there was a little bit of a publicity stunt aspect to them getting banned. But Jackass I remember the mean you say the starting it off with with with them right in the shopping cart. The TV show it would start off with like the Minutemen with it with a Minutemen song and you're like, Oh, this is awesome. This is gonna be great.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, the Jackass movies always had fantastic soundtracks. I was just rewatching the first two and like, just Number Two had that great bit with the snakes in the ball pit and they were having it played to Johnny, Are You Queer? Which is one of my favorite songs. I mean, like it they always had bangers but it You're right. It's they had that like forbidden ness to it. But they even just having that pre emptive of warning. The stunts in this show are performed by professionals. Do not do it with your dumb friends. You know, I had a lot of parents worried like, Oh my God, these kids are gonna be doing it. Listen, we were already doing that stuff. Like I grew up bored kid in the woods. We were doing dumb shit all the time. It's like in Scream when they say movies don't make killers. They just make more creative. We weren't that creative. And it didn't make us that much more creative. We were just replicating some of the stuff we saw the shopping cart stuff. Oh man, we destroyed many shopping carts pulling those stupid stunts.

James Jay Edwards:

And one of the my favorite times I ever got yelled at by someone else's parent. We had our dirt bike our BMX bikes out at our bike track, and we were laying down in between the jumps and jumping over each other One of the kids moms saw us and freak out. She's a call. If you don't clear them and land on him, you could kill him. You know, we're like, we never thought of that. But when do you not clear them? These are easy jumps.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, yeah. And I mean, and that's, that's the kind of the, in that entertainment. I mean, it goes far back, we see it a Nightmare Alley, you know, going back to the old days of the circus of seeing the geek and seeing, you know, people chop, kick. I mean, I went to the California Institute of Abnormal Arts. Before the pandemic, there was a bearded lady there, who was doing stand up comedy, she was fantastic. And she started cutting a cucumber on her arm like she held in one hand, it was chopping it on her forearm because she, as she said, I don't feel pain, but I do pass out at the sight of blood. So let's see if we, if I pass out so there's that. That form of entertainment that's always been around with human humanity and humankind. And one of the great things about Jackass is there's always that build up and release you know, and you see when I saw Jackass Forever, there was a very small crowd. I saw it on midday on a Tuesday so the people who go to AMC for discount Tuesdays at like noon on a Tuesday are not the crowd that's gonna go see Jackass. So there's maybe five people you could hear the room gets silent before some of these stunts and then not release their breath until you hear one go. Which is always the great release. You see, you know, like Number Two when they did the DC security ballistics balls. gag where you see Bam and Ryan just drop immediately. And Johnny's just standing there with his hand covering his face. And everyone's just like in pain belling over and you're just sitting there in absolute shock and the Johnny just goes oh, is this good? Pointing out his face oh there we're good. You know, like there's a lot of those like beats that happened with horror you know the build up and then release is the same with comedy and no one is ever really rooting for these guys who get hurt you know no one wants to see someone break a leg no one wants to see you know some of the stuff that happens but you know the occasional the bruising and stuff like that. That's always you know, acceptable. It's a part of it. Did you guys see? Perchance the Jackass Shark Week special they did in promotion of the new movie. Yeah,

James Jay Edwards:

I did see I did see there's a new generation of jackasses though that's that's my big takeaway from it was Johnny Knoxville was kind of the ringleader. But they're all these dudes I'd never heard of. Yeah, a few

Jonathan Correia:

of them see and jab, sir. And Jasper. Jasper is actually carry over from the TV show Loiter Squad, which was the wolf gang crew TV show that Dick house produced. But Poopsie is new. And they had him do a bit because the whole thing was them trying to conduct experiments with sharks. So it was a bit more in the Wild Boyz style of jackassery. But they had poopsie jumped the shark like Fonzie and happy jacket and everything. But they're in this whole time, they've been skirting the line of like, okay, we're kind of messing with the sharks, but not getting to the point where they will attack us, you know, we're still kind of keeping within it. But dude, he ate it right into a big batch of sharks and immediately was grabbed by a shark by the arm and pulled under. And yes, it is harrowing to watch because this whole time it's like that risk is there. You know, the risk of death is always you're messing with sharks, so of course it's there. And then to just see a man get pulled under and like you see a blood just going everywhere. It's terrifying. And he's okay. You know, he's his arm got, you know, cut up real, real bad. And they show him in a cast, but he's good. And it was almost weird. Because the whole time you know, they're messing with sharks like, Well, you shouldn't mess with sharks, you know, but we knew that this was a risk this whole time. We don't blame the sharks at all. Like they made that a huge point. Like we don't blame the sharks for what happened because the end of the day a shark is gonna do what a shark is gonna do. And we were doing some dumb shit around sharks. It's like, Yeah, you were so like, you kind of got what was coming to you.

James Jay Edwards:

Sharks going to shark. I did look up. Actually, it was recommended for me on YouTube. The top 10 Jackass injuries. Yeah, these guys really do get hurt. And they sometimes they get hurt badly. And my favorite injury was there's one sketch I think it was from the TV show where Johnny Knoxville fought butter bean. But I mean is this 370 pound he's considered a knockout artist. And his thing is he bought he just yeah, he's a boxer. But he's huge. He's this big bald guy. And he specially is knocking you out so they go into a department store with like a girl. You know, they're I think it was Loomis. I think he's the drummer for whacks but he hangs out with the Jackass guys. He is in a referee outfit. And then there's like girls with round one, round two, you know cards, and they go into these department stores and they'd ring the bell and they would just start fighting and butter being not holding Back sent Knoxville Oh,

Jonathan Correia:

it was one department store. That was a that was a one time thing, man. He knocked him out real good.

James Jay Edwards:

But that they showed like, like them getting like blown by like jet engines and like flying and. And it's like you don't realize they get hurt until this thing shows them and then it shows it plays in slow motion you're like, Oh yeah, that hurt you know, um, I think the intro of one of the movies, I think it's Pontius and maybe done, they get pulled, there's something around their legs and they get pulled off to the side real quick. And I think one of them broke a collarbone or something. I mean, the guys get messed up for. I mean, and I know in the early days, there were some addiction issues with them. I think they've all kick now except for poor bam, who isn't on the show anymore. But like, I think Steve o was a real, you know, the shit he would have to do for jackass? You know, he probably did it to medicate.

Jonathan Correia:

Oh, his, uh, his his addiction is very well documented. After the series ended, he put out a lot of series of videos that were supposed to be like, I'm doing crazy stuff, but you really go back and re watch those. And it's like, that is a man with some, like real issues with Whippets, I think was like a major thing. But it was it's really great to see his recovery. You know, I mean, like, especially growing up, you know, when I was very impressionable teenager, so like, you know, we grew up watching, you know, bumfights and stuff like that thinking that this was funny. In retrospect, none of it's good at all.

James Jay Edwards:

That's another thing. So how much of Jackass Do you think inspired stuff like bumfights? Or like the guys who who hit the streets and do stupid shit like that? Do you think that Jackass you know people are trying to get famous or sell videos in the style of Jackass

Jonathan Correia:

I can see people trying to replicate the success of it I mean even like going back to video store days there was a lot of I would see like VHS tapes for like low budget stuff where it's like real life Fight Club, you know, and backyard wrestling and you know, those type of videos that were trying to replicate that but they were also trying to replicate the success of video skateboard videos that were coming out pre jackass. So like a lot of the big brother videos. That that was pre Jackass stuff. Actually, I I wasn't until I watched there's a fantastic documentary on Hulu about Big Brother. Because that was the skateboard magazine and they would put out these videos that would highlight the little shenanigans that people would do on things. And that's kind of like where Knoxville and the director Jeff Tremaine got their start was with big brother, and one of the big skits was in big brother's dude. And that's the one where Johnny Knoxville does the bulletproof vest test. And you see him go out into the middle of like this thing and he takes like, gun and shoots himself in the chest and it is one of the it's it's so uncomfortable. It's one of the most uncovered I remember that that's why I when I think of like early jackass, I think of that as like, faces of death for me because I remember kid you know, a friend's brother being like, Hey, do you want to watch a video where a guy shoots himself? And there's that like, yet Does he live? Like what what happens there and like Johnny Knoxville is recovers you know but like holy shit like you see he's there's so much build up with him just standing there and like shaking and stuff and it's just like why are you doing this? There's no way they're paying you enough to risk this please don't replicate any of this at home and

James Jay Edwards:

what I always like on the TV show are the ones where people didn't really get hurt they were just like funny surprise ones like I one of my favorites is when we man pulled when a stranger calls to and painted himself like the wall and then people would walk by he goes

Jacob Davidson:

oh yeah, one of my favorites was that time I know they put some kind of like jet inside of a manhole and then had to do dresses the devil get blown out of the manhole and it's just kind of walk he's gonna walk away and all the people are like what the fuck was that? That

Jonathan Correia:

was brilliant on many levels because there was the shock and surprise him wearing like the goofiest devil costume. But also he landed straight on his head like it threw him up anyway. So he as soon as he stood up, he was so disoriented and messed up. He was like, oh, whoa, yeah, we're taking California and then like, as soon as like the people walk away he's just like, I have no idea where I am what is happening? I am dazed.

Jacob Davidson:

That's a fact. Like I feel like it that's what is another part of the appeal of Jackass and these types of stunts is that like, you know, just the tension, you know, does he don't know like how this is gonna go because it could go pretty badly for these people like eyes. When I saw Jack as forever like I hadn't sweated like that while watching a movie in a long time because I was just like, oh my god they're not gonna do it all they're gonna do and oh shit.

Jonathan Correia:

Especially the the bull stun you know, it's all we've seen Knoxville do many times in the past jackass, I think it was the first one or the second one they did that brilliant teeter totter with four of them on it. So they're like avoiding the bowl, and we've seen Jack but we've seen Knoxville get knocked out by a bowl many times, but in forever, he gets hit hard, and you just see him on the ground not moving. And the silence in that theater, you could slice through with a butter knife. It was insane. And like you just see him kind of like slowly kind of recover and like that was one of the biggest hits he's taken. And I think they even made the joke in the trailer like oh, yeah, concussions aren't good when you're at after the age of 50. Luckily, Knoxville is 49

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, yeah that I do remember that that? Yeah, weird that they cut that out of the movie but kept in the trailer.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, but I mean, and that's ultimately what it comes down to is we want to see these guys succeed. We want to see them pull off these crazy things. We want to see them you know, survive, but like there is that morbid curiosity of like, oh, shit, this could go real South real quick. You know, they're messing with alligators. They're messing with rockets and whatnot.

Jacob Davidson:

I poisonous snakes. Yeah. Venomous snakes.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, and when that real life consequences come in, you see it happened. That's one of the reasons why they stopped making wild boys. Their program where it was Steve and Chris, Pontius going around it was like their Jackass nature show, essentially. But once Steve Irwin died, they went Oh, shit. Like, that was that hit them? So are they're like, we're gonna stop doing this. Because if that can happen to Steve Irwin,

James Jay Edwards:

like a guy who knows what he's doing? Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, and, and they always had like, some of the best you know, safety precautions as you can with this type of material. But like filming wise and whatnot, they even interviews for for forever, they they praise like the COVID safety protocols and protocols around everything, you know, surrounding the stun and whatnot. But yeah, it's it's it just the show. It's very the show was always very avane garde, I would say, I mean, like you have the big stunts and whatnot, but there would always be like little clips of like, something random happening. Like it'd be a two second clip of someone in a panda suit running into somebody else and then it cuts to the next thing you know,

James Jay Edwards:

I just think it's funny that they they all mask up to protect against COVID and then go and drink each other's sweat or something stupid.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. No, that was a gross though.

James Jay Edwards:

Are you ever found was it? Yeah, would I think it was Steve? Oh, drank Preston's sweat. They put Preston in a sweat. wrapped in Saran wrap on like a

Jacob Davidson:

treadmill like, man. Oh, man.

James Jay Edwards:

He had to drink so I almost puke. Uh, he did puke.

Jonathan Correia:

He did. There's a lot of those, man.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, no. That's the other thing too is that it's not even just the violence. That's it's the gross out stunts, that kind of push you to your limits.

Jonathan Correia:

And then and then the film's especially like, from two on they they incorporated a lot of like the guys's friendships and two, which I always thought was it's always interesting, like how you can have these really gross things going on. But there's that bond, there's always that bond of like, going through these things together. And you see them supporting each other even if they put them through the each other through the most messed up things like BAM has a huge fear of snakes. And so that's one thing that they have, you know, exploited a few times throughout the films and whatnot, but you always see like, your Well back in the day done rip come out and like you know, make sure he's okay after and whatnot. And so

James Jay Edwards:

that's the thing about the whole about the sweat drinking one is like, as Steve over there barfing and throwing up pressing his opinions. Are we cool? Are we cool? And he like shakes his hand while he started. Oh yeah, I just drank a bunch of your back sweat. I think we're

Jonathan Correia:

but But Jay, I do have to say you have to watch Jackass forever if if only for one skit, and that's because it's titled Silence of the Lambs. And that's all I'm saying. And it is that was a good one. It was brilliant. It was like putting yourself in that position the whole time and it's terrifying and like what they do to them is so messed up and it's so in line with the movie and the entire time because it's they basically kind of recreate the end with the night vision goggles. And so like they have no idea what's going on while they're messing with them in this pitch black room and the whole time Chris Pontius is just in the background doing his best Buffalo Bill impression.

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah. Also, I was thinking about it more and you know, I just feel like yeah, you know, just we The morbid curiosity thing it's also just yeah, you know, it's like the there's actual risk in this, you know, you watch most movies or action movies or whatever, you know, there's, you know, you know that what you're seeing is in real you know that these people, you know, are doing these stunts and they're fine, you know, through the magic of cinema and CGI or effects or whatever, but you know, like with jackass, you know, this is, you know, like a real, you know, as real as it gets for mainstream film. And, which is why it also made me think of, you know, like the appeal of another movie, you guys remember roar? Yeah. Oh, yeah. Oh my god. Yeah. Cuz like, the whole shtick with the well, the rerelease of roar, as it was, you know, because like, I think it was through Alamo or something. But, you know, they even had the tagline like, no animals were harmed during the making of this movie, but the cast and crew were

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, they listen, how many were

James Jay Edwards:

most of the crew got sent to the hospital? The cinematographer got scalped?

Jacob Davidson:

Yeah, got a fucking line ripped his scalp off.

Jonathan Correia:

It's because it's a movie about people who were actually living with mines and share and it was dozens

Jacob Davidson:

and dozens of fucking lions. Holy shit. Yeah. I mean, that's, that's the thing. You know, you give people you give an audience a real sense of danger. And it does attract it to him. Like I remember going to a bunch of screenings where people checked out and like, that was one of the most intense movies I ever saw. Cuz you know, you just see like a lion swipe at Tippi Hedren and you're just like, holy shit. Yeah.

Jonathan Correia:

And that's and that's the thing I mean, like that's why do we go to stunt shows that's why Evil Knievel and Travis purse drama with with the Nitro Circus, you know, those are professional stunt people. We go to see X Games, we see people to do all these extreme stuff. And they're really good at it. Like that's one of the big appeals of Christmas, John Krav. The Travis purse drama with Nitro Circus. Evil, can you and it's always harrowing, seeing those like off moments of things going bad. And so the appeal of Jackass is these, they are professionals, but they're professionals at not being good at these things and not doing great stunts. And that's like, the comedic appeal of it. Because, you know, I was a part of that, you know, group where, you know, hang out with a bunch of skateboarders. But I can't skateboard for shit. But I can do some real dumb shit with the with the shopping cart. You know? I may not be good at skateboarding. I can take a hit.

James Jay Edwards:

That's part of the like you say? Like, like the guy who walked on the tightrope? Was it between the World Trade Center towers or wherever? Yeah, nobody wants to see that guy fall. But knowing that there's a chance people are gonna watch well Jackass removes the knowing there's a chance because, you know, they're so it's all it's all just the morbid. It's all the more of it's satisfying the curiosity, it's the morbid sense of, you know,

Jonathan Correia:

you know, the alligators going to bite them, it's a matter of where and how bad and, you know, they they managed to escape many and crazy stuff. And the ones that are, were always the most like, holy crap, someone could have died, where were the unexpected stuff, like the rocket stuff. And number two, you know, they were so worried about like, how Johnny's gonna fall into the water, all this stuff. You didn't think that the rockets were gonna explode out the side and it was like, eight inches away from like, getting them right in the abdomen, you know? So like, that was one of those things where it's like, holy crap, you could have died. All right, we're gonna do it again. You know, because it didn't work that time. So it's just adds to that tension of like, Oh, crap, this done is nowhere near as innocent as we thought it was gonna be and we could hopefully never see something so bad happen.

James Jay Edwards:

Well, some of the some of the stuff they would do some of their stunts, and they're lucky no one got hurt worse than just, you know, a concussion or, you know, a bruised abdomen kind of thing because they do some stupid shit.

Jonathan Correia:

I mean, just even going back to the, you know, Shark Week special jumping into that pool of sharks. And when one of them grabbed him and all that blood came out, I mean, blood in the water, we all know that that's not good. And a shark is gonna do a shake is gonna do so

James Jay Edwards:

was it the Shark Week special where they actually had a shark expert on there. And every stunt he's like, Oh, I recommend you don't do this.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah. But that was the thing too, is that they were they were doing stuff that like is, you know, collecting data, they were just doing it in the dumbest way you could possibly do it like they would do stuff like they had Jasper in a floating tube. And they were checking out like the poundage of shark so they would bite onto this weight system thing and he would hold it as they would pull to see like how strong sharks are. But typically you would do that in a much safer, smarter environment not just sitting in a

James Jay Edwards:

entered checking how powerful is sharks bite is by getting the shark to bite him.

Jonathan Correia:

Not him directly, but he had like a big piece of bait basically in his hand on a weight thing. So it could have easily gone south very quickly. But yes, they did have an expert to be like okay, This needs to stop now or this needs to do this but yeah, definitely the trying to replicate Fonzie was the was the big like, alright, we're, we're kind of doing this let's just do a very easy going swimming with sharks thing. And I did like that even though I I'm glad they didn't end on that note of poopsie getting seriously injured and that they did have like an actual swim with sharks to show like, oh yeah, if you respect the shark, and you do things proper, you can have an amazing experience of swimming with them and just like kind of hanging out and it's, you know, really respect, you know, the world around you, which is an ironic statement to be giving after having just watched 40 minutes of them just fucking with sharks, you know,

James Jay Edwards:

you know? Alright, let's call this one. I think we've talked enough about jackass. So those of you who are still with us, thanks for bearing with us, because you're like we said at the beginning, this was not a very horror centric episode, but hopefully you got something from it.

Jonathan Correia:

Again, coming from the fringe guy.

James Jay Edwards:

Hey, we talked about Moonstruck last week. We could talk about Jackass this week.

Jonathan Correia:

Yeah, March we'll have more titles.

James Jay Edwards:

Cool. So Our music is by Restless Spirits. So go rock with them. And our artwork is by Chris Fisher. So go check him out. You can find us on any of the socials. Eye On Horror pretty much everywhere. for@ihorror.com which is the site we all call home. And yeah, what's your favorite Jackass stunt? Let us know. My favorite is the when a stranger calls back we man because I just don't like seeing people get hurt. I would rather see them get scared.

Jonathan Correia:

Definitely Silence of the Lambs from the news. That man tops. I'm telling you it's such a brilliant bit. It's so messed up. It's so much fun to watch. And I really do hope they do a next generation with movie with these new cast because they all killed it. No. Yeah.

James Jay Edwards:

What about you, Jacob? What's your favorite?

Jacob Davidson:

Well, it's hard to pick one. Yeah, that to say I really liked the opening of Jackass one with them writing the giant exploding shopping card set to Carmina Burana, just because that was so iconic, and I feel like even today.

James Jay Edwards:

Okay, cool. Well, let us know your favorite and, and see if it lines up with ours. And we'll see you in a couple of weeks with hopefully a more hoary episode than this one. So if you're still here, I'm James Jay Edwards.

Jacob Davidson:

I'm Jacob Davison.

Jonathan Correia:

And I'm Jonathan Correia.

James Jay Edwards:

Keep your Eye On Horror.

Intros
Jay Praises Mr. Ballen's New Podcast
Jacob Gets Back Into Magic The Gathering
Correia Watches Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
American Pop and Ralph Bakshi Fanboying
Jacob Revisits The Fly After Last Week's Heavy Topic
Jacob Revisits Evolution in Honor Of Ivan Reitman
Real Life Body Horror: Legacy of Jackass
Outros